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leslie10646

Portadown Junction

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Posted (edited)

Proof that not only is a model railway never finished, but in this case - barely started!

My model railway philosophy is exactly that of the late Drew Donaldson - have stock, run the trains to timetable and to heck with scenery. I like to run trains and over the last quarter century I have built up a considerable loco fleet (mainly steam, although I have supported others in their diesel activities), about twenty GNR mahogany coaches and (I have no idea really) about a hundred Irish goods wagons - the reason I started Provincial Wagons was that I needed goods stock. So, this is NOT for the lovers of layouts (believe me, I admire their work, but it's beyond me) - it's for running my trains! 

First its home - my loft - converted eight years ago - gives a whole new meaning to clutter (I still have hundreds of Star Wars figures belonging to my boys, endless suitcases, boxes of books I saved in case I ever got a chance to read them) and shows what a nightmare modern house roof beams are to the would-be modeller.

At the far end you can see the original Richhill GNR(I) cabin diagram with the station below it - well - the correct track layout is there. Portadown station (again, more or less the correct track layout and nothing else - not even platforms) is to the right under the eaves. There is a bit of running line on the left side with loops off each line and the actual Junction, roundhouse, goods yard are behind me.

You can see my desk in the middle of the floor - it should be for modelling, but apart from a couple of clamps, useful for cutting rail etc, that's the limit of activity there. The Provincial Wagons stock drawers just to the right of it.

DSC03208.thumb.jpg.fb99c2425109e45ffe8aca9827a059f5.jpgI put this up in shame, in the hope that if I live through this dreadful virus, some progress will have been made.

 

Edited by leslie10646
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Think we've all been there (and indeed continue to revisit in my case), to a greater or lesser extent, Leslie. My own workshop is close to the limit in terms of storage and accessibility, so every so often, I force myself to have a tidy up and put things away. Trouble is, as soon as you start modelling again, the number of tools and material required grows exponentially in comparison to the task!

 I call it 'three pin plug syndrome'. After all the years these things have been around, you'd think we could buy one that required, at most, two tools to wire it up. But no. Two, perhaps three different screwdriver heads, wire stripers, pliers and, in my case, usually many rude words because getting the wires to sit neatly is an unbelievable faff!

 Enough already!

Maybe I'll start a thread on 'my workshop', or perhaps one exists already? Either way, we can show how we both empathise with your pain and share ideas of how to make our modelling areas (because by no means everyone has the luxury of a dedicated space) more user friendly.

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I like the sound of that idea, David.  I have a corner of the dining room where Rosses Point sits, with cupboards for stock and tools underneath. Any serious work requires temporary possession of the table, and I don’t like cluttering it up for long hours (while I’m at work) with soldering kit whilst the family might want it for other purposes. My wife gets creativity (she works in a variety of mediums) and is very understanding but a soldering bench is not a pretty sight to inflict on her!!Working with plastic card is much easier as that’s much quicker to set up and take down. Much of my modelling requires a psychological self-kicking to get over the inertia of setting up the kit for a few hours work. I do draw comfort from Richard Chown who had similar issues. He’d go to the workshop even when he couldn’t be bothered - saying that he’d leave after twenty minutes if he couldn’t get motivated. Twenty minutes generally got him going!!  

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Ah, the two Davids missed my point but they did hit a sore point - that you can never find what you want to do an apparently simple task. I have an ex HMSO Index book on my desk marked "Where things SHOULD be" - a source of much merriment to one visitor.

The reason for my shame which will be obvious when you watch the bit of video I'm about to put up - track down (VERY badly in some cases), absolutely no scenery, not even platforms or ballast!

Turn the sound right down, or you'll be deafened - that's me talking behind the (shaky) camera

I forgot to mention what the other bit of double track was - so listen on -

Finally (you'll be relieved to know) where the expensive stuff is kept - mainly hand made (by others) - and YES, it needs a building!

 

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Lesslie 

lovely layout 

you say it is exactly like Drew Donaldson whitch is true.The only thing is that all of drew engines were in Cie green as he liked them liked them in that color.In my own mind you should do some scenery as drew engines were class but look better in a scene than on lots of track. To prove it would you want to sea some of his engines in a formation on his layout or on a scene like the Inchicore model up at Cultra but it's you layout not mine and the hobby is meant to be enjoyed.

MM 

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Hi MM

Thanks for comment and encouragement to get my finger out. Ex digitate! Mea culpa.

As we say in the North - ye're dead right.

Working on it!

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Thanks 

By the way I forgot to mention it but the stock is beutiful. All the engines have really good paint jobs on the them.If only I could do something like that.😔

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Posted (edited)

You can only try - you’ll be amazed what you can actually achieve. Practice a few techniques and you’ll be well away. Have a look at Connoisseur Models website for O gauge kits. I learned how to solder and build brass kits from the advice there.

Edited by Galteemore

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Posted (edited)

Well, for good or ill, I've made a start to scenery.

I'm ballasting the Junction area and of course, you can only do a bit before you go crazy and in any event, it's best to leave each section to dry for a day or two. Soooo......

It so happens that the station at the North end of the house - Richhill - has had beautiful buildings for the past 5/6 years, but nothing else. The builder is a man of great renown on this site and I'll name him when I get the buildings planted.

A large area needs to be built up to platform level for the station yard facing the building entrance (on the level, no steps) and a goods "beach" (dock to most people who didn't hear the local stationmaster call it that). The building up has been done - photos later, but for now, that "Beach". No laughing at the first efforts for fifty-odd years of a one eyed (LEFT, by the way) right-handed 73 year old bloke, who was never any good at modelling anyway.

DSC03250.thumb.jpg.5efd8f85983dc9d63bed051871da0427.jpg

This is the side everyone would see and this other side is invisible, except you crawl under the board and view it from the suitcase storage area behind!

DSC03251.thumb.jpg.d70788872df64dfc90545fc08da6bce8.jpg

You can see my "method" - platform height batten with a Plasticard surface. The Plasticard embossed sides were painted and then stuck on with good oul' Rocket Cardboard glue. Those sides were given a "mortar" undercoat and then "dry-brushed to bring out the stones - to say that it's a slow process would be a fine piece of English understatement.

The gravel surface used a method championed by Gordon Gravett in his landscape modelling book - a thick coat of paint and then scatter the preferred surface material. I did it in small sections, scattering the material when the paint was barely off the brush. I have made an error in that the prototype had edging right down the ramp and the edging stones should be off-white.

You may wonder at the long wall with no surface. Just a feature of my design tactics - it WILL get a surface!

Final point - I first modelled this beach in 1970 (in the bedroom of my digs in Manchester) on the first Richhill - believe me, it was crude!

Edited by leslie10646
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Lovely little platform 

No offense but a bit small for Portadown junction platforms but you've got the nack to build great looking platform.

MM

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Hi MM

Thanks.

It probably got lost in my verbiage, but it's only a loading platform for goods and is part of the Richhill station on the layout.

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