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gm171 kk
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I'm afraid it's sold pending payment. 

I've also had another 150mm cut out from the center as I don't need the scenic space. 

The plan is to make a late winter scene of a curved section of double track mainline. There will be a passing loop and ballast loading siding on one side. There'll be a lot of dead grass, bare trees, frost, puddles and an overall washed out effect. I'm looking forward to getting into it. 

Photos ©CIE141 on YouTube. 

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19 hours ago, gm171 kk said:

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Sad to see it's come to an end. I've really enjoyed watching this layout progress over the last year and a bit. I'm sure your next will be even better, considering what you've produced so far. What a fantastic shot to finish things off, very nicely done. 

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On 18/7/2021 at 9:21 AM, gm171 kk said:

New layout boards braced ready to be treated before track laying. 

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Those Kien Hung containers look very well with the IRM 42ft flats, I wonder did it ever happen in real life?

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I've had a nightmare trying to get track to align on the joint between the two halves. If anyone has any suggestions I'd love to hear them. I've tried solder the rails to nails but it's not really working. 

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Davc I think had some snazzy stuff joing the boards on his Layout to join up. might of been all straight sections though.

After also doing a baseboard join on a curve I used PCB board with Rails soldered to them. Not got round to cutting them through just yet. This is behind the scenic area so is heavy duty.

 

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Edited by Georgeconna
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I always lay the track across any baseboard joins and cut the rails afterwards. I use screws, rather than nails at the join, so I can adjust their height to the bottom of the rails. Nevertheless, laying curved track across a baseboard joint is always challenging.

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Posted (edited)
On 27/7/2021 at 7:17 PM, David Holman said:

I always lay the track across any baseboard joins and cut the rails afterwards. I use screws, rather than nails at the join, so I can adjust their height to the bottom of the rails. Nevertheless, laying curved track across a baseboard joint is always challenging.

That's pretty much what I have done. 

192 and 143 on a fertiliser train overtake 133 and 129 in the loop with a liner. 

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Edited by gm171 kk
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18 minutes ago, gm171 kk said:

That's pretty much what I have done. 

192 and 143 on a fertiliser train overtake 133 and 129 in the loop with a liner. 

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That superelevation looks so realistic - don't remember seeing that modelled before. Superb.

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@gm171 kk Here is a link to my version of the coper clad sleeper baseboard junction, ignore my plug in track section that covers the board joins for your purpose- it's like George's example! the sleepers are screwed down at each side with Peco track screws to the edge of the boards, track is soldered across and then the track is cut.

https://irishrailwaymodeller.com/topic/7330-gauge-00-exhibition-baseboard/?do=findComment&comment=121228

Eoin

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've managed to sort the alignment issue for the time being fowever I am having issues where the cant in the track changes slightly as it means one corner of a wagon lifts off the rails and derails the train. A real pain! 

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  • 2 weeks later...
5 hours ago, DJ Dangerous said:

How did you manage to bank the curves like that?

I tried but it was either not noticeable, or I had derailing on exiting the curves.

I put a strip of cork under one side of the track. I've had a lot of issues with it even still. My four wheeled stock keep derailing. 

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As you have found super elevation introduces twist and unsprung vehicles can go  3 wheelled only very easily if transitions too great - the real railway is very wary of twist.  Theoretical amounts of elevation are hard to apply and often a less than optimum is used to allow for varying speeds of traffic - cant deficiency.  Certainly in the model form less is definitely more !!  and across pointwork very hard with overscale gaps especially the crossovers between running lines - they need to be flat this introduces twist on approach and exit roads and into trouble you go !   I suspect this made worse by the track layout with pointwork distributed as it as to be for the loops to work.  I wish you well and I am sure a compromise will be made to work for you.  

Keeping curve and no twist through joints will be "fun" as well in the video one joint on the inner curves shows perhaps an other problem with cant the flexible road bed is compressed - track pinned ? and the high ( outer ) rail dips into the joint, the bogie stock can be seen to get over with the bogies dancing happily, the 4 wheel ballasts go over but the brakes do wobble.  You might well need to shim the upper rail having eased the track pins/ whatever is holding the track.  

When you glue ballast then the advantage of the flexible road bed could be reduced and might mean vertical alignment will be fixed and any twist a permanent feature.

Regardless it is a great looking layout   and I am sure you will get it to run successfully, the rail wheel interface is a dark art and success is to be enjoyed. It will I am sure showcase your great modelling and the great stock now in and close to the market place.         

Happy modelling and thanks for showing.

Robert 

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The Chatham Club's 7mm layout is a double track, two metre diameter circle, which we superelevated by using one millimetre shims and seems to work fine, even when we add the 5m straight section to make it an oval. No points mind, apart from the storage loop. Ignorance is bliss, methinks, having read Robert's excellent notes.

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As Robert points out, you need to be oh so careful with cant and transitions on model railways. They are not the same as the real thing, where space is, generally, not at a premium. I’m another who subscribes to the ‘less is more’ point of view. You only need a hint of canr to have the desired effect.

Stephen

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