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Peco Code 75 or 100 Wooden Sleeper

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Hi guys, while I don’t as yet have a layout, I’m wondering about the choice of track that would be best suited to my plans.  I would much prefer from what I know, ( which is not a lot when it comes to laying track,) that Peco code 75, wooden sleeper would be the best for me..!  I don’t know if this track actually exists..! I’m hoping to plan my layout for the late ‘40’s to about late 90’s !  Any help / suggestions would be much appreciated,  TIA
BTB

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2 hours ago, burnthebox said:

Hi guys, while I don’t as yet have a layout, I’m wondering about the choice of track that would be best suited to my plans.  I would much prefer from what I know, ( which is not a lot when it comes to laying track,) that Peco code 75, wooden sleeper would be the best for me..!  I don’t know if this track actually exists..! I’m hoping to plan my layout for the late ‘40’s to about late 90’s !  Any help / suggestions would be much appreciated,  TIA
BTB

Hi Paul. All my life I used  Peco code 100 streamline, which I was very happy with in my ignorance, but I've since switched to code 75 for new work which I really like. Visually there's not that much difference, especially when ballasted and weathered in. I've also switched to electrofrog points which is a bit of a PITA as regards a bit of extra wiring but the Cobalt point motors help with that as the frog polarity switching is all local. Some old Hornby and Lima stock may not run over code 75 points due to the pizza cutter wheel flanges 20-30 years ago on rolling stock, especially old locos.

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Hi guys & thanks, I’ve already wondered about Code 75 & 100 Bullhead, simply because I don’t understand the difference, with the +’s  &  -‘s & associated with each type, I also don’t know exactly what’s the best when it’s Wooden sleeper, ( does that type of sleeper make any difference ) also the type of electric points to use where you use Flexitrack, ( I’m beginning to get scared already....) In a nutshell, can you use Code 75 Flexitrack Bullhead with wooden sleepers..! just to get me started,

Paul

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34 minutes ago, burnthebox said:

Hi guys & thanks, I’ve already wondered about Code 75 & 100 Bullhead, simply because I don’t understand the difference, with the +’s  &  -‘s & associated with each type, I also don’t know exactly what’s the best when it’s Wooden sleeper, ( does that type of sleeper make any difference ) also the type of electric points to use where you use Flexitrack, ( I’m beginning to get scared already....) In a nutshell, can you use Code 75 Flexitrack Bullhead with wooden sleepers..! just to get me started,

Paul

Code 75 flexitrack and code 75 points fit together. Bullhead requires bullhead points as the rail profil (is shape) is different requiring special fish plates. Also the last time I checked there were very few types of points available for bullhead, but it does look great. I don't think its possible to use Bullhead track with code 75 points, but I could be wrong.  I'm in the middle of laying code 75 at the moment (pic below).

Have a look at this thread. Ballyercall uses code 75 Bullhead track. 

 

 

IMG_6511.JPG

Edited by Noel
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Lads,

Interesting that this topic came up as I am about a month out from actually starting on my layout here in the US. I went to my local store yesterday who have only code 83 from Peco and code 100 from Atlas. I would prefer to go with Peco but is there much of a difference besides the height of the rail between code 83 and code 75?

Have no track plan yet but I am about finished prepping the room where it is going in and well I am also looking in a couple of weeks of getting baseboards to get going, all going well. 

Mark

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The rail code number is the rail height expressed in Thou (or thousand of an Inch)     thus Code 83 is 8 Thou or .0008" higher than Code 75.

Peco Code 75 and 80 track systems were designed for two totally different markets.

Peco Code 75 Streamline was designed to provide a closer to scale rail height than the existing Code 100 for the UK and Continental markets. Pointwork geometry is similar to their existing Code 100 Streamline system.

Peco Code 83 was designed as an NMRA (National Model Railroad Association) compliant system specifically for the North American market and pointwork.  

Code 83 point geometry is based on prototype practice and quite different to the Peco Streamline systems. 

For someone starting out with their first layout the difference is mainly appearance between Peco Streamline Code 100 and Code 75 track systems, both are available with wooden sleepers, with a similar range of points and crossings.

Peco provide a useful summary of their different "Streamline" track systems https://peco-uk.com/collections/streamline/75?page=2&view=12&layout=

Code 100 is the safest option for someone running older (pre-1990) models with deeper/coarser wheels particularly Lima, Triang,  Triang-Hornby), Code 75 with the lighter rail section is probably easier to work with (easier to curve) than the larger Code 100 rail section.

 

Edited by Mayner
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All model track is a compromise, unless you go along the P4 route and it is the same in the other scales. Peco code 100 was designed as something robust, but better than set track. However, the sleeper spacings are wrong for British practice, never mind the gauge being 4.5 mm too narrow for Ireland.

 Code 75 track improves things because as well as finer rail, the sleeper spacing are better, though note that this does make the flexitrack less robust than code 100.

 Still want to run older stock? Probably no option but code 100, but disguise it with careful painting, balllasting and a low viewing angle, then it will look much better. All newer stock with finer flanges? Code 75 will look so much better.  There again, how adaptable are the new models coming out these days? Can the 121 and A class be easily converted to 21mm? Likewise all those fine new wagons. Food for thought, maybe?

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Hi guys & many thanks for all your help & suggestions, so tell me this, is Peco Code 75 Streamline & Flexitrack one & the same, as I’m thinking of using Peco Code 75 & has anyone seen what Everard Junction did by snipping the sleepers & spacing them to make the track appear more realistic..! It’s a long process but the end makes a difference,

BTB

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9 minutes ago, burnthebox said:

Hi guys & many thanks for all your help & suggestions, so tell me this, is Peco Code 75 Streamline & Flexitrack one & the same, as I’m thinking of using Peco Code 75 & has anyone seen what Everard Junction did by snipping the sleepers & spacing them to make the track appear more realistic..! It’s a long process but the end makes a difference,

BTB

Hi Paul, Yes I watched Richard's video on that, the end result look well, but not worth the effort IMHO. Our 16.5mm gauge track still looks like narrow gauge, and few are going to the extreme hassle of re-gaugeing their locos and all their rolling stock to run on handbuilt 21mm track. So for me code 75 is the biz. A great selection of points. What's wrong with using it out of the packet?

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Hi Noel & thanks, yes I agree to go to that EJ trouble is worth it in the end, if you want to go that far, but I’m not looking for a professional display, but something that looks the business is what I’m looking for, so if I can buy Peco Streamline Code 75 Flexitrack, Nicole Silver with points & crossings, well that’ll do me, & I forgot to mention I’ll be running relatively new stock as at this minute the older items I have are UK & I’ll be selling any/all of that & I’ll be concentrating on Irish, with only the occasional run of something UK, I only started buying stock in or around 2004, ( would that be OLD STOCK ) but there maybe some rolling stock that might need sorting out..!!! 
Paul

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On 7/12/2020 at 8:27 PM, mmie353 said:

Lads,

Interesting that this topic came up as I am about a month out from actually starting on my layout here in the US. I went to my local store yesterday who have only code 83 from Peco and code 100 from Atlas. I would prefer to go with Peco but is there much of a difference besides the height of the rail between code 83 and code 75?

Have no track plan yet but I am about finished prepping the room where it is going in and well I am also looking in a couple of weeks of getting baseboards to get going, all going well. 

Mark

Some thoughts. 

For someone in Nth America the best choice is probably code 83 because it is readily available and it's my understanding that code 75 is actually slightly under scale.

Also for someone in Nth America using code 100,, a good option is to use Peco point work with Atlas track. I found Atlas easier to lay and the sleeper spacing is wider (more prototypical than Peco). Granted the sleeper colouring is different but this will most likely be painted anyway.

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Does anyone know a safe year that one could use as a guide where Hornby rolling stock and locomotives should be ok to run on code 75? I know I am looking at code 83 over here in the US but I should be use that as a guide for this question. I have Irish, British and American stock so it is whatever I am in a mood to run with. I will not part with any rolling stock as well before Murphy Models, I was getting some Hornby stock and I will not part with it. Even if i cannot run it on code 83 I am keeping the model and I am crazy enough to buy it again and keep the older one!!!

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2 minutes ago, mmie353 said:

Does anyone know a safe year that one could use as a guide where Hornby rolling stock and locomotives should be ok to run on code 75? I know I am looking at code 83 over here in the US but I should be use that as a guide for this question. I have Irish, British and American stock so it is whatever I am in a mood to run with. I will not part with any rolling stock as well before Murphy Models, I was getting some Hornby stock and I will not part with it. Even if i cannot run it on code 83 I am keeping the model and I am crazy enough to buy it again and keep the older one!!!

Hi MMIE353 Any models produced after 1995 should be ok. The main culprits are early Lima 1970s, 1980s and especially Tri-Ang Hornby stuff from the 70s and 80s. I have a childhood class 37 that won't even run over code 100 points.

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Hi guys, got this reply from Peco, which may help myself & those who are encountering hiccups or whatever about Track, Flexi, Code 75, 100, Points etc. etc, 

BTB

“ Thank you for your emailThe large radius turnouts are already available, and are due to be followed by the single and double slips plus a long crossing in the next few months. After that we will be starting on medium radius turnouts with these likely to appear early next year. “ 

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I want to also ask as I got the track gauges from Proses, I did not see the Peco one over here but is it correct to assume that 50mm is the distance that should be between the centers of both rails? Interesting to see that Peco have some catching up it seems with track production. 

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5 minutes ago, mmie353 said:

@murrayec is that also for Peco streamline? I know that set track is 67mm

It would all be the same, it's to do with stock hanging out over the rails on the bends and fouling a train doing the same thing on the other track, you may have some leeway with HO stock but if your going to be running OO Irish stick to above 65mm- at that dim Irish Cravens get pretty close! 

Eoin

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You can, subject to experimentation with your own layout and stock, run straight (flexi)track much closer than the track on bends.

Flaring out the track slightly as you approach the bend, to the point where clashes don't occur..

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@mmie353just remember that Cravens were not the broadest stock to run on irish rails and some PRs and laminate stock (if ever produced) might be a scaled mm or two wider. The longer your stock, (Mk3s, 201s), the wider your stock, the tighter your curves, the greater the wobble when running (occasional cravens, uneven axle, imperfect handmade) the greater your chance of fouling and collision. The track can be a little closer on straights but must begin to diverge approaching a curve to ensure that minimum recommended as the curve starts. Long stock in particular will both overhang on the inside of the curve and the corner will project more from the outside of an inner curve relative to the wheel position

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@DiveController thanks dude, I was looking at the Peco gauges and I am going to get them, I may have to get them on Amazon but we shall see, must get some track and get a plan together. From what you and Murrayrec have advised, I may stick with going 67mm between the rails. 

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On 7/26/2020 at 5:37 PM, mmie353 said:

@DiveController thanks dude, I was looking at the Peco gauges and I am going to get them,..... I may stick with going 67mm between the rails. 

The gauges are usually back to back to measure the distance between the rails on one track. There are others but don't know that much about them. The 67mm rec is from between centers (or any given same point on both rails e.g inside of the R/H rail on track 1 to inside of R/H rail on track 2).

It might be easier for spacing to lay two parallel tracks with 67mm centers and then measure exactly the correct distance between the rails of adjacent tracks (less than 67 mm), or between the sleepers (less again). Then you can get some spacers to shove between the tracks as you lay them rather than keep trying to measure 67 between centers.

Other option is to mark one track center, then an adjacent line 67 away and stick your pins in but it get trickier if you want to put down cork or closed foam then you remark etc. Seems like spacers would be easier and if you get a mm or 2mm off laying the first track, your track separation is maintained

 

Edited by DiveController
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Posted (edited)

Hi guys, & thanks, now what’s the difference, if there is a difference between Peco all Nickel silver code 100  & Peco code 200 Wooden sleeper, TIA

BTB

Edited by burnthebox
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