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Galteemore
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3 hours ago, Noel said:

Looks a perfect partner for B113

1100 & 1101 later B113 & 114 were built with oil fired steam heating boilers similar to British Railways diesels.

The boilers were removed at some stage after the "Tin Vans" were introduced in the mid 1950s.

The UTA heating van looks like a shortened version of the self-propelled armored trollies built by the NCC during WWII.

The trollies were  disguised as bulk cement wagons and fitted with a Leyland engine, gearbox and transmission and were intended to patrol the NCC lines to detect sabotage.

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Exactly Mayner, that’s what I thought it was at first, remembering an old Five Foot Three article. It does look rather excessively military. Given postwar shortages, wouldn’t surprise me at all if some of the platework off that wagon was repurposed.

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On 20/12/2020 at 6:35 PM, Galteemore said:

Fantastic new photos on the site from the Clements collection. Includes lots of SLNC photos, @Irishswissernie
Some very rare views, including 1928 photos of locos in old livery. Lots of other stuff of general interest -including narrow gauge - I even think there’s Cork and Muskerry in there too! 

Many thanks for posting the link, I spent about 2 hours this afternoon browsing through Clements photos and it's just incredible stuff, so much variety from wagons, coaches and all types of rolling stock, I thought we were spoiled by the George Mahon collection, Clements is equally outstanding, and his favorite company the Midland is well covered, photos taken at Broadstone in 1926, nearly one hundred years ago, it's just fantastic these photos are available now online particularly in the present times, to think the IRRS has existed since 1946 and it's only in the last 10 years since the present Photographic Archivist came into the position the photos are now digitized to a high quality and now available online, it must be very tedious work in all that scanning but you can see it in the results, such high quality and detail, hard to believe some of the photos nearly one hundred years old, rare and superb stuff, excellent.

Regards

hg

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Clements loved the Midland! I had several long conversations with him about it right up until a few months before he died. He was, as one would expect, probably the greatest authority on this system ever to have lived.

His encyclopaedic knowledge of Midland (and other) engines lives on, through the work of Michael McMahon and Jeremy (unrelated) Clements in their GSR "bible".  

I cannot open this link above - mentioned in first few posts. Can anyone copy the pic here?

"Anyone know what this is at York Road, NCC 3099?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/irishrailwayarchive/50736845218/in/photostream/"

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2 hours ago, h gricer said:

Clements is equally outstanding, and his favorite company the Midland is well covered, photos taken at Broadstone in 1926, nearly one hundred years ago, it's just fantastic these photos are available now online particularly in the present times, to think the IRRS has existed since 1946 and it's only in the last 10 years since the present Photographic Archivist came into the position the photos are now digitized to a high quality and now available online, it must be very tedious work in all that scanning but you can see it in the results, such high quality and detail, hard to believe some of the photos nearly one hundred years old, rare and superb stuff, excellent.

May I echo the above statement. Ciarán Cooney has done wonders with the material that would have otherwise sat in the vaults in Dublin. One of my most memorable IRRS London meetings was when Ciarán gave a presentation of IRRS photo's and finished with a demonstration of old damaged colour photographs and the results that he had "repaired". They end results were nothing sort of AMAZING! A very talented guy to whom many of us should be very grateful.  

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8 minutes ago, Lambeg man said:

May I echo the above statement. Ciarán Cooney has done wonders with the material that would have otherwise sat in the vaults in Dublin. One of my most memorable IRRS London meetings was when Ciarán gave a presentation of IRRS photo's and finished with a demonstration of old damaged colour photographs and the results that he had "repaired". They end results were nothing sort of AMAZING! A very talented guy to whom many of us should be very grateful.  

Very true - and Ciarán's own 'Eiretrains' website is definitely well worth a look: http://eiretrains.com

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As a teenager, I spent hours going through my dad’s collection of images, and thought I had seen pretty much what was out there, SLNC wise. In those days you bought slides and photos off very basic, unillustrated, catalogue descriptions, and you picked out what looked like the best. But what delightful and convenient access we have right now. These are halcyon days for researchers, with so much stuff available. Many thanks to Ciaran and of course our own Ernie ! If you’re not an IRRS member, this archive alone is worth the sub cost. 

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4 hours ago, airfixfan said:

Can I also thank Ciaran for his fantastic work and know from personal experience from writing articles and researching unidentified photos etc just how much time and patience this all requires. Will enjoy going through the latest archive in detail over the next few days.

Yes I fully echo that too, Ciarán's photographic knowledge, skills and qualifications in photographic technology is just incredible, some of my own rejected slides that I had consigned to the recycle bin unable to scan were brought back to life by Ciarán's skills. The improved photographic quality in the IRRS journal, particularly photos from the late J. McCartney Robbins who is nearly 70 years dead, his priceless negatives in storage for decades and now being scanned, digitized and restored by Ciarán, sometimes spending hours restoring a single photo, maybe a damaged negative where the original image is so badly worn. McCartney Robbins and Bob Clements were friends, both born in 1910, but Clements outlived McCartney Robbins by 40 years, McCartney Robbins died at the young age of 42, but he squeezed a lot in his short life leaving a legacy of high quality historical photos. The workload just keeps increasing with more collections waiting on restoration, and the cine films is just another workload, the late Tom Dowling films have been restored and covers the early 1960s, another great photographer that recorded very historical workings and can be seen here.

  

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6 hours ago, Galteemore said:

As a teenager, I spent hours going through my dad’s collection of images, and thought I had seen pretty much what was out there, SLNC wise. In those days you bought slides and photos off very basic, unillustrated, catalogue descriptions, and you picked out what looked like the best. But what delightful and convenient access we have right now. These are halcyon days for researchers, with so much stuff available. Many thanks to Ciaran and of course our own Ernie ! If you’re not an IRRS member, this archive alone is worth the sub cost. 

A few of your fathers photos now feature on the Disused stations section from Foyle Road to Strabane.

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