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What do you use for track sub-roadbed

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mrhd
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Hi

 

I am about to start construction of my first decent layout (IR modern image - MM 141/181, 201's etc) and I was wondering what if anything are you guys using for track sub-roadbed.

 

Our U.K. neighbours seem to all go with 3mm cork-sheet and the US seems to prefer Homasote which seems to be some sort of fibre-board.

 

However some people don't bother with anything, including the author of an article I was reading recently (in BRM i think), he argued that modern locos are much quieter and a lot of the time if the cork is glued down properly the sound transfers to the baseboard anyway.

 

regards

MRHD

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Hi

 

I am about to start construction of my first decent layout (IR modern image - MM 141/181, 201's etc) and I was wondering what if anything are you guys using for track sub-roadbed.

 

Our U.K. neighbours seem to all go with 3mm cork-sheet and the US seems to prefer Homasote which seems to be some sort of fibre-board.

 

However some people don't bother with anything, including the author of an article I was reading recently (in BRM i think), he argued that modern locos are much quieter and a lot of the time if the cork is glued down properly the sound transfers to the baseboard anyway.

 

regards

MRHD

 

Hey! I think it really depends on the running speed of your layout. I didn't bother with anything, as my layout is an 8 x 4 terminus to fiddle yard, which means my trains won't really be running very fast. However, I would definitely recommend putting something down if you're going to be running the trains at a reasonable speed, as no matter how quiet the locos are, the rolling stock tends to make quite a lot of noise if going fast! Any chance of getting some info on the layout on the layout page? ;)

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This came up a couple of days ago http://irishrailwaymodelling.com/showthread.php/2791-To-Cork-or-Not-to-Cork

 

The only real advantage as discussed is the raised shoulder when ballasted. As for sound as soon as its ballasted the sound is transferred back through the ballast. The only other advantage if your baseboards are slightly misaligned the underlay makes up for it.

My baseboards don't suffer from that problem!

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I have used the cork floor tiles from Wickes and they have worked very well. My baseboard is a bit of overkill, most of it is shuttering ply but its what was on hand for free! and yes you can stand on it. But the cork floor tiles do take out any uneven areas. And stuck down with nonails or some such glue. You can only hear the wheels running on the rails. Mike

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I used a 4mm thick foam sheeting used for floating wood floors. I picked up a pack of 12 3x2 sheets for €20 in Homebase in Nutgrove about a year ago. Easily cut and as Dave said it's useful if there is any irregularity in your baseboards.

 

But as said, once ballasted it does nothing for sound!

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