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Colour light signals

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Garfield
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Seamus, having been one of those soldiers who couldn't solder for sh-one-T, the solution is:

-low temp solder (which I could throw in with the kit for free)

-fine sandpaper ( to remove the oxide layer) and most importantly

-flux fluid(Carrs Green is a good one)

 

Once you have these, it is easier than glueing, seriously. It is next to impossible without these items.

 

Alternatively, I could look at presoldering some of the elements for a few quid extra, leaving some easy glueing and painting to the customer.

 

But I do suggest trying the solder...

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Weshty, I don't know if you do searchlight signals in your range. These were to be found at various locations on the CIÉ network and some lasted until the 1980s. The ones I remember best were on the south-eastern suburban between Connolly and Merrion which were replaced by the first type of DART signals (themselves now being replaced by more modern versions). If you don't do them, and if anybody is interested in including that type of colour light signal, I came across an American company, BLMA models who produce a very nice model of the H-2 searchlight signal. While these are based on the US prototype the look almost identical to the ones used here. Check out the website BLMAmodels.com to see examples.

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Seamus, having been one of those soldiers who couldn't solder for sh-one-T, the solution is:

-low temp solder (which I could throw in with the kit for free)

-fine sandpaper ( to remove the oxide layer) and most importantly

-flux fluid(Carrs Green is a good one)

 

Once you have these, it is easier than glueing, seriously. It is next to impossible without these items.

 

Alternatively, I could look at presoldering some of the elements for a few quid extra, leaving some easy glueing and painting to the customer.

 

But I do suggest trying the solder...

 

i would a bit of practice first-but will give it a lash. dont think im thick when i ask this...are all soldering irons the same?

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Seamus,

 

"...are all soldering irons the same?"

 

A perfectly valid question. Some have adjustable settings, useful if soldering whitemetal to brass (NOT something I would try, that's what superglue was invented for).

 

I bought a bog standard electric one for €12 about four years ago and it does the job just fine.

 

 

I did buy one of those gas powered ones thinking there would be more control and portability but it's a nuisance as you have to refill them. With the electric one you can just leave it on for the 1-2 hour session you'd be using it for.

 

To solder:

Give the iron 5-10 minutes to heat up

Dip the iron tip in the flux bottle

Touch against the solder wire

Dip in the solder bottle again and the solder will run up the tip. This is called "tinning the tip", and you are now ready for business.

 

Sand the two surfaces to be connected

Use a small little paintbrush to dap some flux on both the surfaces.

Touch the solder tip against the solder and get a small drop on the solder tip

Touch against one of the surfaces and it will run onto the surface (the flux breaks down the surface tension and helps it run)

Put the two surfaces together

Press the soldering tip against it for a second ot two to heat the solder, and remove the tip once the solder liquifies and runs.

 

Job OXO.

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