Jump to content
  • 0

Weathering

Rate this question


Liverbird81
 Share

Question

8 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

The 'bible' for all things weathering is Martyn Welch's book 'The Art of Weathering' [Wild Swann pubs]. First issued a few years ago, it has never been bettered & Martyn's genial prose makes everything seem achievable. He also tells us what colours to use for each job - mainly Humbrol enamels. Eg No53 [Gunmetal] and 133 [bauxite], plus a little matt black and or leather is perfect for the generic 'underframe dirt' and variations enable oily bits to be done too. he book not only covers locos, but also open wagons, vans, coaches and the ubiquitous BR steel mineral, with rust being done the right way - ie put on first & then [with some Maskol] the top coat on top. It is my most read/used book of all time & I always go back to it whenever the paint or airbrush needs using again.

Still in print, you will not regret buying a copy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Liver, there was a great article in britiish railway modeller possibly august which did a nice job on weathering locos with weathering powders.

 

I'm working up a photo package showing how to weather a Plasser Tamper with a paintbrush, some gouache, and a cotton bud, and more importantly, how to undo it if you screw it up. No airbrush required. Might even do it as a video!

R

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
The 'bible' for all things weathering is Martyn Welch's book 'The Art of Weathering' [Wild Swann pubs]. First issued a few years ago, it has never been bettered & Martyn's genial prose makes everything seem achievable. He also tells us what colours to use for each job - mainly Humbrol enamels. Eg No53 [Gunmetal] and 133 [bauxite], plus a little matt black and or leather is perfect for the generic 'underframe dirt' and variations enable oily bits to be done too. he book not only covers locos, but also open wagons, vans, coaches and the ubiquitous BR steel mineral, with rust being done the right way - ie put on first & then [with some Maskol] the top coat on top. It is my most read/used book of all time & I always go back to it whenever the paint or airbrush needs using again.

Still in print, you will not regret buying a copy.

 

I agree 100% David it is fantastic. Martyn demystifies the whole process in such a genial way. I love the piece where he occidentally discovers how to get that silvery hue when producing a weathered timber look. Liverbird if you are after a video the right track series of dvd's with Tim Shackleton are worth investing in. Both guys tend to mix their own colour's and don't use off the shelf weathering colour's which gives their work a more personal look.

 

Rich,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use