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Scenic lights

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Kirley
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I have included quite a number of scenic lights on my layout run from a 12v supply.

 

IMG_0110.jpg

 

As I intend to add more lights to Clonmel Station buildings I was wondering that is the maximum number lights you can run from one 12v DC controller? Is there other power supplies you can use for this purpose?

 

Any information (as long as it is not too technical) would be most welcome.

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Kirley,

 

It depends on a couple of things...

 

1) How many amps does the DC controller supply?

 

2) Are the lamps bulbs or leds?

 

Typically, leds will draw around 20ma each depending on their brightness while bulbs will draw closer to 100ma each. If your DC supply is say 1amp (1000ma) then you can power up to 50 leds from a 1amp supply, but only 10 bulbs.

 

Are you powering the lights from an old DC trainset controller?

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Something like this

http://www.ebay.ie/itm/AC-100-240V-to-DC-12V-Switching-Power-Supply-Regulated-Transformer-for-LED-Light-/231017022958?pt=UK_BOI_Electrical_Components_Supplies_ET&hash=item35c9b005ee

 

Is what I'm using for overhead lights, and for the scenic lighting. It puts out 10A at 12V and is fully regulated (and has a voltage adjustment, so you can drop the output down a few volts (handy for LEDs and avoids messing with resistors to reduce brightness)

 

You can then run a DC 'bus' and take feeds off for each area with lighting (photo looks gorgeous btw! )

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Something like this

http://www.ebay.ie/itm/AC-100-240V-to-DC-12V-Switching-Power-Supply-Regulated-Transformer-for-LED-Light-/231017022958?pt=UK_BOI_Electrical_Components_Supplies_ET&hash=item35c9b005ee

 

Is what I'm using for overhead lights, and for the scenic lighting. It puts out 10A at 12V and is fully regulated (and has a voltage adjustment, so you can drop the output down a few volts (handy for LEDs and avoids messing with resistors to reduce brightness)

 

You can then run a DC 'bus' and take feeds off for each area with lighting (photo looks gorgeous btw! )

 

10A?!!! You could light a house with that!

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Thanks Guys for those helpful replies.

 

I am running a mixture of LED's and other bulbs and using an old DC trainset controller? Stephen, that Power Supply Regulated Transformer looks the business if I could run a number of bus wires of it as I wish to be able to control the lights in particular areas rather than having all the lights on the layout on or off.

 

IMG_0377.jpg

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Something like this

http://www.ebay.ie/itm/AC-100-240V-to-DC-12V-Switching-Power-Supply-Regulated-Transformer-for-LED-Light-/231017022958?pt=UK_BOI_Electrical_Components_Supplies_ET&hash=item35c9b005ee

 

Is what I'm using for overhead lights, and for the scenic lighting. It puts out 10A at 12V and is fully regulated (and has a voltage adjustment, so you can drop the output down a few volts (handy for LEDs and avoids messing with resistors to reduce brightness)

 

This looks like the answer to my needs. I take it you still need required resistors for the LED's?

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