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Old Blarney

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Old Blarney last won the day on January 30 2015

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About Old Blarney

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  1. G class diesel livery

    David, As far as I'm aware the G Class were never paints in Grey, as per the 121 Class. The first deliveries, G601/603 were delivered from Germany between September and October, 1955. G602 was overhauled in July, 1960, repainted green and returned to the Clara Branch. G603, in CIE light Green was photographed in Limerick Station,26th, August, 1962. G611 Class. All seven were delivered in February,1962, in green livery but like the rest of this class of locomotives (G611) it would shortly be repainted in the new CIE Black and Tan colours prior to entering service. Information taken from - Journal of the Irish Railway Record Society, February, 2016, Vol 27, No189. Author. Author, Dan Renehan. "Deutz G Class Locomotives of CIE.
  2. MGWR Inspection Saloon

    Richard, What a beauty! That coach would be a prize on Old Blarney. A yes from me. JB. Can you provide information on the liveries this coach ran in? GSWR, GSR and then into CIE Green i suppose? Did this coach run in various CIE Greens? David White.
  3. GNR(I) T2 Sound

    Gang, Can anyone out there help with this question please? I wish to put a Sound Decoder in a T2 GNR(I) Tank Locomotive. What Sound Decoders are best suited to give a GNR(I) Sound? Assuming no Irish Sounds are available, what British Sound Decoder would best suit a ZIMO Decoder?
  4. Old Blarney goes south for the Summer. Old Blarney has been invited to -The Great Central Railway - A wonderful location. Real railway and model railways too. Three day Model Railway Exhibition. Friday to Sunday 16th to 18th June 2017. Please come for a chat. All welcome. http://www.gcrailway.co.uk/modelevent/ https://www.facebook.com/SoarValleyMRC/
  5. I found this Film from UK Channel 4. I'm unaware of it having been posted on IRM. Well worth watching. The quality of the pictures can, at times leave one frustrated. See whom you recognise! Happy viewing. Old Blarney.
  6. I found this on the Internet and hope it may be of interest to others who read this article!. Original Article - History of Ireland http://www.historyireland.com/20th-century-contemporary-history/fifty-years-of-busaras/ PART I Fifty years of Busáras Published in 20th-century / Contemporary History, Features, Issue 2 (Summer 2003), Volume 11 Busáras-view of the curved canopy and control room. (de Burgh Galwey) In the late 1930s the general public in Dublin had been agitating through the newspapers for better transport facilities, specifically the provision of bus shelters along the quays where long-distance passengers caught their buses. In 1937 the Irish Builder and Engineer suggested that a central bus station be constructed on the bonding warehouse site next to the disused and abandoned Custom House dock. The 1939 ‘Sketch Development Plan for County Borough of Dublin and Neighbourhood’ also proposed a central bus station, but at Aston Quay on the McBirney’s department store site, keeping the original building frontages. It also recommended that a site be put aside at Wood Quay for a future station as needs might change. In early 1944 the decision was taken to build a bus station. The site was to be central, convenient to rail, sea and road arteries, and near the Liffey. Four sites were considered: Store Street, Aston Quay, Wood Quay, and Haymarket, Smithfield. The Irish Omnibus Company selected Store Street, the cheapest and easiest site to acquire and bounded on two sides by roads. By opening up a new road and bridge to the east of the Custom House, the site was to be made into an island, easing traffic circulation. The site was also close to Amiens Street railway station, which was to be the new central railway station as proposed by Abercrombie, and the B & I ferry terminal to Britain on the North Wall, as well as the local bus routes. The area was the focus of most of the traffic coming into the city from the north of Ireland. Dublin Corporation, however, favoured Aston Quay, with a second station at Wood Quay, while the government preferred Smithfield. Córas Iompar Éireann The bus company went ahead and bought the Store Street site from the Dublin Port and Docks Board for £13,000. The architect Michael Scott had been holding informal discussions with the Irish Omnibus Company since May 1944. In early 1945 he produced a plan for a two-storey circular bus station for the newly formed Córas Iompar Éireann (CIÉ), with a concourse on the ground floor and a restaurant, booking offices, newsreel cinema and other facilities on the first floor. This was granted outline planning permission and the old bonding store was quickly demolished and part of the dock filled in. CIÉ promised the travelling public that the station would be open within twelve months. But in early 1946, after no progress had been made, Dublin Corporation revealed that CIÉ had still not submitted detailed plans for the site. A new plan was then submitted, with four storeys instead of two. CIÉ had intended to extend their existing O’Connell Street offices and to amalgamate their administration. Their offices were scattered all over Dublin at the old regional railway company headquarters. On examination the O’Connell Street property was deemed unsuitable for extension, and so the extra office space was added to the bus station design. Thus the building developed into the final design concept of two blocks in an ‘L’ shape with a curving station in between. On 3 October 1946 the Irish Times printed a photomontage of the Custom House and the proposed new building on its front page. This showed a massive block looming over the Custom House and purported to be derived from the elevations and plans submitted to the Corporation. Scott retaliated by initiating legal proceedings against the newspaper, claiming damages for libel on the grounds that the montage had completely misrepresented his design. After a lot of behind-the-scenes negotiations, Scott finally got an apology in April 1947 plus costs. Under the agreement, the glass plate from which the photomontage was printed was broken into several pieces and handed over to Scott so that it could never be reproduced. At the time of the picture’s publication, considerable fuss was made over the fact that the new building was to be much taller than the Custom House. The Irish Times was leading the opposition against the building and claimed that the exterior façades were ‘more suitable for a factory than for a public building beside the Custom House’. The Corporation planning committee postponed their decision until they could take advice from the Royal Hibernian Academy and other interested bodies. After finalising the design for the building, CIÉ submitted the plans for permission to commence construction but were refused by a narrow majority of the planning committee. They then went to appeal, resubmitting their proposal to the general purposes committee of the Corporation. It was passed narrowly on condition that stylistic changes be made. Originally the office accommodation was to consist of one eight-storey block at the rear of the site, mounted on a two-storey bus station podium. However, the length of the city’s fire ladders and rights of light on Store Street dictated that the main block’s height be lowered by two storeys and that the accommodation be placed in a three-storey block at 90 degrees to the other block. Controversy reigned, with the newspapers declaring that the new building would create too much cross-town traffic, causing problems on the quays. Even at this early stage the design was arousing interest in the architectural world. In July 1947 Architectural Design stated that ‘by the time it is finished, it can easily claim to be one of the masterpieces of modern architecture judging by the sketches and descriptions received to date’. Inter-party government halts work No sooner had building work started than CIÉ began to experience serious financial difficulties, suffering losses of over one million pounds in 1947. Consequently it became a common opinion that the building was a white elephant and a folly for a cash-strapped company. So when the general election of 4 February 1948 brought in a new inter-party government led by John A. Costello, it was decided not to proceed with the project in its original form and work was halted. The new government decided that the office accommodation was too prestigious for a transport company and that it should be appropriated for use as government office space.
  7. For anybody who is unfamiliar with this Company and their excellent products - please visit their site. http://www.railexclusive.com/products.php I have two of their BR Class 24 Locomotives, each with sound. Old Blarney.
  8. Perth Show 2017

    Perth and District Model Railway Club Our Celebration of Model Railways 2017 Dewers Centre Glover Street Perth PH2 0TH Saturday June 24th 10.00am--5.30pm Sunday June 25th 10.00am--5.00pm[/b]] At least 40 Superb Layouts and over 40 Trade Stands. The return of Blair Atholl to the Exhibition Circuit, http://www.blairatholl-drumochter.co.uk/gallery/ Please look at this link for Photographs and Video of this outstanding Model Railway. How to come to Perth The Dewers Centre is next to Perth Railway Station. Park and Ride from Broxden on Saturday. Free Parking at the Dewers Centre. www.perthmrc.com.
  9. Phil Verster to leave Scotrail

    Neil Kennedy 3:04pm Fri 20 Jan 17 This from Network Rail's website this afternoon... Network Rail and Abellio have today announced that Phil Verster will be moving to become Managing Director of the East West rail project that was announced by Transport Secretary Chris Grayling last month. He will take up his new post in the spring. Phil’s successor has been agreed and will be announced in the coming days. Mark Carne, Chief Executive of Network Rail said: “Phil has done a great job setting up the ScotRail Alliance and overseeing the delivery of one of the largest programmes of rail modernisation in Scotland since Victorian times. I am delighted that a leader of Phil’s calibre will be heading up the new East West rail project, recently announced by the Secretary of State. We have agreed a replacement to succeed Phil and will be making an announcement shortly.” Dominic Booth, Managing Director, Abellio UK said: “Phil has played a key role in helping us create the ScotRail Alliance, the first time an operating company has come together in such a deep alliance with Network Rail to deliver the very best for our customers. We are currently investing in a fleet of 70 new trains, which will transform the rail travel experience of our customers.” Phil Verster said: “Over the last two years I have worked with my team to launch the ScotRail Alliance, delivering hundreds of commitments and laying the ground for the exciting new train fleets that will start to arrive later this year. The opportunity to build on these same principles with the creation of a new business such as East West Rail is great for me and my family, and I wish the ScotRail Alliance team all the best for the future.”
  10. Old Blarney will be at DUNDEE this coming week end. Information available from this link. http://www.dundeemrc.talktalk.net/dmrc_003.htm Four of the coaches featured in Tales from the Carriage Shed will be running thanks to a certain individual from Hamilton, New Zealand. http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/showthread.php/2921-Tales-from-the-carriage-shops/page11?highlight=Carriage+Shed
  11. Is this Dun Laoghaire?

    Take a look at this link and the photograph on it. http://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/image/xpw042330?search=Dublin&ref=268 The text states it is Dun Laoghaire, 1933. While there are similarities to DL,I have my doubts that it is correctly captioned. Looking at the coaches/s in the siding, these have two distinct colours and the complete one looks like a sleeping coach! Any suggestions on where this is?
  12. Please move up the Car!

    It is amazing what one can find on the internet! For those who have an interest in Trams and buses, have a look at this link - Enjoy!
  13. Plans for the future!

    http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/infrastructure/single-view/view/dublin-20-year-transport-strategy-published.html This link is published in Railway Gazette. This article may be of interest? Something old, something new? Some re-announcements,some tweaking of previous plans! I notice the possibility of reopening the line to Navan is mentioned yet again along with the extension of DART to Drogheda. My question on this plan - Why is there no mention, or proposal, to electrify the existing Drogheda to Navan railway link as a precursor to the possible reinstatement of the Navan to Parkway formation? Reinstating a commuter rail service from Navan to Drogheda, and thence onward to Dublin, would have many benefits. It would also make financial sense for future reinstatement of the Navan to Parkway link. This missing link would provide a circular railway route that would service a multitude of commuter towns to the North and Northwest of Dublin. Such a bi-directional service would/could draw custom from a vast corridor of commuter towns in the areas it serves.
  14. Goodbye Sir Terry!!!

    What a sad day. We have lost an inspired and inspiring fellow. David.
  15. Trams and Buses in Dublin 1948

    Nostalgia! Some wonderful photography of our Trams and Buses in O'Connell Street and Bridge.
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