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merlinxlili

Brake coaches in formations

Question

In a fully vacuum-fitted passenger train was it necessary to have the brake coach at the rear end of the train? I imagine that having the handbrake there would provide an extra margin of safety in case of the train dividing.

If so, it would be logical that fixed train formations would have a brake coach at each end, to avoid shunting at the end station?

I do not see any requirement for this in the 1949 rule book I have.

Apologies for this basic question.

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Fully fitted trains can have the brake anywhere.

 

Im not so sure, there was a requirement to do a brake test , that requires the test to be performed in the last vehicle of a fitted train.

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They're all connected...... look, for example, at Mk 2 or Craven formations. At the end of the journey there didn't swop the brake to the other end. This can also be seen today at Downpatrick.

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Posted (edited)
Im not so sure, there was a requirement to do a brake test , that requires the test to be performed in the last vehicle of a fitted train.

 

There is a requirement to perform a bake test (specifically a brake continuity test) between the front of the train, usually the locomotive and the rear of the last vehicle. Where the last vehicle is a brake van there is a brake lever and vacuum gauge in the guards compartment to allow this, where the last vehicle is a standard coach or freight wagon ect this is done via a device called a tailpiece. The tailpiece fits on the end of the vacuum hose and contains a vacuum gauge and valve to allow the brake test.

 

I am sure I have a picture of one somewhere, I will post it if I can find it.

Edited by snapper

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There is a requirement to perform a bake test (specifically a brake continuity test) between the front of the train, usually the locomotive and the rear of the last vehicle. Where the last vehicle is a brake van there is a brake lever and vacuum gauge in the guards compartment to allow this, where the last vehicle is a standard coach or freight wagon ect this is done via a device called a tailpiece. The tailpiece fits on the end of the vacuum hose and contains a vacuum gauge and valve to allow the brake test.

 

I am sure I have a picture of one somewhere, I will post it if I can find it.

 

Exactly!

 

Loose-coupled, of course, needs a brake at the end.

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Some of the cravens had a guards compartment fitted with a vacuum brake gauge which could also be used for this purpose and had a Train Line Brake (TLB)

Limerick Junc 162 img738

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MK2 & MK3 coaches had a cabinet at one end with either a vacuum or air pressure gauge so the guard or shunter could carry out the brake test. \

 

There was also a rule allowing up to 5 coaches to be marshalled behind the van, this mainly applied to branch and suburban trains. Typical 4-5 coaches and a van on the Connolly-Drogheda or Connolly-Arklow suburban trains or one or two coaches and a van on branch line services out of Limerick to Ballina, Ballbrophy or Rosslare

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