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Did anything like there ever run here?

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heirflick
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hi lads,i got these coaches from wrenneire and found out that they are short clerestory coaches made by hornby, repainted to irish green livery with flying snail logos. tyhe white roof therw me off a bit but after talking to JHB, he confirmed that coaches did in fact run with white roof prior to 1925!. couldnt send him a pic so i said id throw up a post here and show them. my bigger question is did anything like these ever run here?confused-face-smiley-emoticon.gif

 

strange coaches 001.jpg

strange coaches 004.jpg

strange coaches 002.jpg

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Beautiful job!! Yes, carriages like that did run here. There are several possibilities. The only carriages ever to run in Ireland with bowed in ends were of WLWR origin. The lighter unlined green you have and snails indicate a late '50's repaint, so your coaches are probably kicking about Dublin to be brought out on Naas race days, or set to work on the Portarlington-Athlone train, or maybe based in Cork for local traffic. With a clerestorey roof, though, you're looking at a handful of GSWR origin vehicles.

 

The WLWR only had six bogie vehicles! That narrows down the nearest possibilities to 48ft brake composites 102/3, which the GSWR / GSR / CIE renumbered 937/8, both built in 1898 and surviving until 1955. For light green, you're just in there! But they didn't have clerestorey roofs... which if you were really keen, could easily be remedied. One of those would be your brake. The full-3rd or full compo you also have would be closest resembled by WLWR 95/6, built in 1896. These ended up as GSWR / GSR / CIE 986 and 987, scrapped in 1960 and 1959 respectively. Again, standard WLWR bowed ends, but no clerestories. If you prefer the clerestories and ignore the bowed ends, the GSWR built eight coaches, drawings for which haven't survived, but that according to specs in the GSWR carriage book would be like thefull-seating one. These were numbered 507 (1885), 487-90 (1888) and 465/6, and 502 in 1901.

 

The above would be the closest to what you have, but they do "look right" irrespective of whether you want to be that strict... and an excellent paint job too. As I say, if you really wanted to pass them off as an actual vehicle, I'd go for replacing the roofs with normal ones, and numbering them in the WLWR series. Hope this helps!

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I can't add anything more to the prototype info provided by jhb but it is possible (if you really want to and have the time and patience) to trim off the bowed ends so they are "flat" and use some plasticard stirp to build up the vertical panels; I have done this with some similar Ratio coaches which are also are based on GWR prototypes. These are "based on" a GWR design fairly loosely,as Triang/Hornby in those far off days went for a general impression rather than a specific " scale model". The coaches were originally produced in chocolate and cream to run with the dean 4-2-2 loco "Lord of The isles" and then re-appeared in many other liveries later. Hope they run all right - they will be Ok if you use Code 100 but probably will jump all over the place if you use 75!

 

I attach a rather poor picture of a sort of "BCDR" coach I hacked from one of these coaches and yes, the BCDR DID paint its coach roofs white. They didn't stay that way for long though.

 

Colm

 

BCDR coach.JPG

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I always liked the Triang clerestories apart from the roof and bowed ends fairly typical of GSWR & CBSCR stock running in the 50s.

 

This type of coach seems to have been common with C Class haulage from Albert Street to Courtmacsharry and Timoleague

 

Perhaps a race, seaside special behind a new silver or green C Class.

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Yes, indeed, the CBSCR had shortish bogie coaches which looked much like that, and they kept at least 5 or 6 in Albert Quay for those excursions as the curves were too tight for many another type of coach, including - I think - all 6 wheelers. To make those, all you'd need to do is change the bowed WLWR style ends, as the coaches on the CBSCR were of GSW and CBSCR origin. To be ultra perfect, the darker green would be appropriate; I don't believe those old stock were ever the light green, as the railcars had arrived and they were just in reserve. One or two of them had a localised Albert Qua livery of dark green, but no light bands above and below windows, in fact no lining at all; but two "snails" despite short lenths, and the "class" numeral on each door. Those Triang coaches actually have many uses but as seen above very much look the pafrt with or without conversion into something specific. (Black ends though!) :-)

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Some railways in N Ireland kept "coloured" ends for a long time! On the BCDR it was only during WW2 that ends began to be painted black. I have done some of mine each way for variety. And the GNR did rhe ends of their blue and cream coaches the same colours as the sides until it died in 1958! The NCC however moved to balck ends in the mid 1930s.

 

Of course, i expect that the ends in all railways would have become darker until they might well have appeared black due to buildup of muck etc.!

 

Colm

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