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Armistice Day

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Garfield
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As you probably know, yesterday was Armistice Day. While most people associate it with commemorations for war dead in the UK, there were also ceremonies held here to remember the Irishmen who fought and died in World War I.

 

In Longford, the local branch of Óglaigh Náisiúnta na hÉireann held a commemorative ceremony at the the WWI memorial in the town's Market Square. Here's some footage I shot of the event: http://www.longfordleader.ie/news/local/video-armistice-day-commemoration-1-4469527

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Top notch production - well done.

 

Cheers. Only thing that annoyed me about it was that I would've liked to have had the guys facing the opposite direction during the interview (to avoid the shadows), but some rubberneckers had moved in after the ceremony and didn't want them waving at the camera when talking about something like that...

 

 

well done to all concerned . a simular event was held here by the lads of Post 51. 'lest we forget'

 

Any photos of that, Seamus?

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If you look at the percentage per population of men that gave their lives in the great war, Ireland had huge losses. My Great Grandfather served in a Welsh Regiment. Even though he survived a part of him never came home. Truly brave men that deserve to be remembered and honored.

 

Rich,

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My grandfather was in the artillery in France and his brother was in Salonika - I never knew either of them, but I did know an old boy over here who joined up at 14, lied about his age - they told him his teeth were too bad the first time he tried, possibly they suspected the truth, but he went and had them all out and returned a few days later and was accepted - he wouldn't talk about anything that happened after that until he got back afterwards...

 

Always worth reading All Quiet on the Western Front or Goodbye To All That...

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My grandfather was in the artillery in France and his brother was in Salonika - I never knew either of them, but I did know an old boy over here who joined up at 14, lied about his age - they told him his teeth were too bad the first time he tried, possibly they suspected the truth, but he went and had them all out and returned a few days later and was accepted - he wouldn't talk about anything that happened after that until he got back afterwards...

 

Always worth reading All Quiet on the Western Front or Goodbye To All That...

 

Two great grand-uncles on my mother's side joined the British Army and died at Flanders shortly afterwards. Only one of their bodies was recovered.

 

On my dad's side, my great grandfather served as a sergeant with the US Army and is mentioned in a book about the history of his Infantry Regiment. After the war he returned to Ireland and used his military experience to train volunteers during the War of Independence.

 

+1 for All Quiet on the Western Front. Storm of Steel by Ernst Jünger is also well worth reading, although it's a bit more 'stiff upper lip' in comparison.

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I prefer the original All Quite on the western front movie myself to the remake. I must get the book sometime. I think a lot of us have relatives that fought and gave their lives. Who would have thought that a bohemian corporal serving in the German army would plunge the world into another war 21 years later.

 

Rich,

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Marshal Foch said, of the Versailles Treaty - "This is not peace. It is an armistice for 20 years"...

 

Indeed. It was the harsh conditions of the Armistice agreement that laid the foundation for the rise of extremist politics in Germany.

 

On a lighter note, I read this simple explanation of the politics behind the outbreak of WWI...

 

World War I Described in Familiar Terms - Humor

 

Germany, Austria and Italy are standing together in the middle of the bar-room, when Serbia bumps into Austria, and spills Austria's pint.

 

Austria demands Serbia buy it a complete new suit, because there are splashes on its trouser leg.

 

Germany expresses its support for Austria's point of view.

 

Britain recommends that everyone calm down a bit.

 

Serbia points out that it can't afford a whole suit, but offers to pay for cleaning Austria's trousers.

 

Russia and Serbia look at Austria.

 

Austria asks Serbia who it's looking at.

 

Russia suggests that Austria should leave its little brother alone.

 

Austria inquires as to whose army will assist Russia in compelling it to do so.

 

Germany appeals to Britain that France has been looking at it, and that this is sufficiently out of order that Britain should not intervene.

 

Britain replies that France can look at who it wants to, that Britain is looking at Germany too, and what is Germany going to do about it?

 

Germany tells Russia to stop looking at Austria, or Germany will render Russia incapable of such action.

 

Britain and France ask Germany whether it's looking at Belgium.

 

Turkey and Germany go off into a corner and whisper. When they come back, Turkey makes a show of not looking at anyone.

 

Germany rolls up its sleeves, looks at France, and punches Belgium.

 

France and Britain punch Germany. Austria punches Russia. Germany punches Britain and France with one hand and Russia with the other.

Russia throws a punch at Germany, but misses and nearly falls over. Japan calls over from the other side of the room that it's on Britain's side, but stays there. Italy surprises everyone by punching Austria.

 

Australia punches Turkey, and gets punched back. There are no hard feelings, because Britain made Australia do it.

 

France gets thrown through a plate glass window, but gets back up and carries on fighting. Russia gets thrown through another one, gets knocked out, suffers brain damage, and wakes up with a complete personality change.

 

Italy throws a punch at Austria and misses, but Austria falls over anyway. Italy raises both fists in the air and runs round the room chanting.

 

America waits till Germany is about to fall over from sustained punching from Britain, then walks over and smashes it with a barstool, then pretends it won the fight all by itself.

 

By now all the chairs are broken, and the big mirror over the bar is shattered. Britain, France and America agree that Germany threw the first punch, so the whole thing is Germany's fault. While Germany is still unconscious, they go through its pockets, steal its wallet, and buy drinks for all their friends.

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