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Running in period - is it needed ?

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aramand
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Hi,

 

What do you do when you get a new loco ? I know (for me anyway :)) the temptation is to get it on the layout immediately but should it really be 'run in' slowly first in both directions ? If so, for how long ?

 

Also a lot of stock has probably been sitting on a shelf for months (if not years!) so is it standard practice to re-lubricate everything ?

 

I just got a 'new' 141 today and it got me thinking, on that model in particular there does not appear to be any easy access to lubricate the cogs, worm drive, motor etc. Unless you take it apart seems all you can really get to are the axles which may not do much good.

 

Maybe a 'sticky' would be good for the less experienced around here (i.e. me !) to show how you should prepare a new loco.

 

Declan.

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Hey Declan!

 

Just my own method, but when I get any 'new' or new stock, I tend to stick it on a loop of radius 3 or so and let it go round for about 30 minutes in each direction. Maybe just a habit, but the stuff tends to run better at slow speeds and generally smoother after a good run in

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Hi,

 

What do you do when you get a new loco ? I know (for me anyway :)) the temptation is to get it on the layout immediately but should it really be 'run in' slowly first in both directions ? If so, for how long ?

 

Declan.

 

Declan

As far as I remember MM 141/181's should be run in slowly for about an hour in each direction, and they really do benefit from this

Helps everything bed in and mesh properly

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Declan you can remove the whole bogie sideframe unit with a little gentle persuasion. You will then have access to the wheelsets, gears, pickups, etc.

 

Rich,

 

Will have a look at this, however the whole concept of needing 'gentle persuasion' scares me :D I'm a big fan of screws what you can remove and know things will come apart rather than using 'gentle persuasion' and hope that you are pulling the right pieces!

 

BTW on a related note, I dont remember who replied to a thread I had on the old site about removing the body on the 141s using a screwdriver to lever the roof off after taking one cab end off - worked a dream on this one so thanks very much whoever it was :tumbsup:

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I would say it's not necessary but the loco will generally tend to run better if you run it in a bit. What 141 was it anyway?

 

It's absolutely necessary as it helps the gears to mesh. It also gives the lubricant time to get into the areas of the gear tower that it needs to.

 

Rich,

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Never Never use a screwdriver to remove the body from a 141/181 they simply pull off

 

Should clarify that the screwdriver is only used with very gentle pressure to provide a little leverage. On the 141s I've tried to remove neither of them simply pulled off :D I know the official instructions say to just squeeze the sides and lift up but it didnt work for me after nearly 20 mins and very sore fingers!

 

Following the instructions (suggesting the screwdriver leverage) the body came off immediately and no damage to anything. However, I guess like everything do so at your own risk!!

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Should clarify that the screwdriver is only used with very gentle pressure to provide a little leverage. On the 141s I've tried to remove neither of them simply pulled off :D I know the official instructions say to just squeeze the sides and lift up but it didnt work for me after nearly 20 mins and very sore fingers!

 

Following the instructions (suggesting the screwdriver leverage) the body came off immediately and no damage to anything. However, I guess like everything do so at your own risk!!

 

I can't seem to get the hang of removing the bodies by squeezing the sides either. My own method (after removing front cab) is to turn the loco upside down, you can get at the tabs that hold the body on if you turn the bogies to the side. It's then a simple matter of easing the tabs away one by one and the body comes off easily. Another advantage of doing it this way is that you don't need to remove the side railings.

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Thanks for all the advice - I have it running in as we speak, is running DCC alright but I guess that shouldn't make and difference.

 

I don't think it makes a difference if you run it in on DCC. I think the reason manufacturers recommend you run in on DC before converting to DCC is so that you can be sure the loco is running properly before you chip it. If you install the chip and it does'nt work, at least you'll know it's not the loco!

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Will have a look at this, however the whole concept of needing 'gentle persuasion' scares me :D I'm a big fan of screws what you can remove and know things will come apart rather than using 'gentle persuasion' and hope that you are pulling the right pieces!

 

BTW on a related note, I dont remember who replied to a thread I had on the old site about removing the body on the 141s using a screwdriver to lever the roof off after taking one cab end off - worked a dream on this one so thanks very much whoever it was :tumbsup:

 

That was me. Works fine for me. There's more than one way to skin a cat. I've found that to be the easiest way, glad it worked for you too :-bd

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