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Abandoned Cultra Railway Station to get a new lease of life

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Kirley
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The Belfast Telegraph reported in August:

 

A derelict listed railway station that is now owned by the Republic of Ireland’s ‘toxic bank’ Nama could be about to receive a lifeline.

Cultra Railway Station, which is more than 100 years old, was dismissed in a condition report as being too expensive to restore — but according to Nama, one buyer is now in final negotiations to purchase and restore it as a residence.

The station has fallen into disrepair and is now on sale for a fraction of its original value. It is the subject of a Facebook campaign to safeguard the building for future generations.

According to Alliance councillor Larry Thompson, the building faces a bleak future if it isn’t saved soon. He has been working with Holywood Conservation Group, local residents and Alliance colleagues to save the old station.

“In the last few weeks I was delighted to learn about the unconditional interest being shown by a potential purchaser who seeks to acquire and restore the building for residential use,” he said.

A condition survey has been commissioned and bid for purchase made despite the building’s dilapidated state.”

“After reading the condition report, which outlined the dire state of the building, I was particularly pessimistic, but news from Nama provides a glimmer of hope that the campaign to save Cultra Station House may soon be ready to depart.”

Cultra Station House has a two-storey section, once used as the station master’s residence, and a main station part of one storey. It has been a private home since 1937 but was vacated in the 1970s and fell into disrepair, and became a target for vandalism and anti-social behaviour.

Alliance councillor Andrew Muir said he had sought to expedite the sale through his contacts at the Dail and Nama is now reporting that a “competitive sales process is being conducted” and parties are in “further negotiations”.

“I now understand that these negotiations are in a final stage and whilst I accept Nama's statement that ‘the final sale price will have to reflect independent assessment of market value’, sale possibilities seem positive,” he said.

Factfile

Cultra Station House was built in 1897 and is assumed to have been designed by GP Culverwell. It replaced Sir Charles Lanyon’s original design which was burnt down in a malicious fire. The replacement was built in a typical decorative red brick late Victorian style and is a listed building, partially two storey and partially single storey. The two storey portion was once living accommodation for the stationmaster and the single storey housed waiting and ticket collection areas.

 

CultraStation072_zps66d34324.jpg

 

 

 

 

Reported on Radio Ulster this morning a local developer has bought the property and will turn it into 2 residential dwellings.

 

If you ever attended the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum by rail then this is the station you would have used.

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They cleared the ground around it a while back and then left it to grow wild again. At that stage I think planning permission was sought for dwellings. I was always suprised why the transport meuseum could not have taken it over and refurbished it. Strange! Probably will end up being demolished and new dwellings put up in its place. Craigavad station building at least was saved even if it was refurbed

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As a complete foreigner I must say that I had nearly the same thougts as Kevin when I visited the UTFM for the first time in last October. The fact that there is a folk museum which is even mentioned on signs along the platforms would have made it an Ideal welcome poit for the UTFM and the building would have made a nice in-situ-addition to the collection of buildings. I agree it is a very good development that the building is now safe, but in my opinion a great chance is lost.

 

 

Gerhard.

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Guest hidden-agenda
As a complete foreigner I must say that I had nearly the same thougts as Kevin when I visited the UTFM for the first time in last October. The fact that there is a folk museum which is even mentioned on signs along the platforms would have made it an Ideal welcome poit for the UTFM and the building would have made a nice in-situ-addition to the collection of buildings. I agree it is a very good development that the building is now safe, but in my opinion a great chance is lost.

 

 

Gerhard.

 

There is very little chance of the museum getting any money for anything at the minute the national lottery gave them money for the last exhibits.

I agree the station building would have been nice had the arts council got there heads together but joined up thinking is beyond them unless its some one else footing the bill and holding their hands just take a look at the Foyle valley museum its a shambles and the council up there never heard of the word marketing.

Rant over.

Edited by hidden-agenda
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There is very little chance of the museum getting any money for anything at the minute the national lottery gave them money for the last exhibits.

I agree the station building would have been nice had the arts council got there heads together but joined up thinking is beyond them unless its some one else footing the bill and holding their hands just take a look at the Foyle valley museum its a shambles and the council up there never heard of the word marketing.

Rant over.

 

Hence lies the problem! No one wants to take responsibility unless someone puts up money for it. Cultra Station House was built in 1897 and is assumed to have been designed by GP Culverwell. It replaced Sir Charles Lanyon’s original design which was burnt down in a malicious fire. The replacement was built in a typical decorative red brick late Victorian style and is a listed building, partially two storey and partially single storey. The two storey portion was once living accommodation for the stationmaster and the single storey housed waiting and ticket collection areas.

 

Read more: http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/local-national/northern-ireland/abandoned-cultra-railway-station-to-get-a-new-lease-of-life-16198980.html#ixzz2I9tXYFI3

 

It is a piece of railway history that has been forgotten due to the fact no one wantss to take the responsibility and probably will be lost.

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