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Nazi 9f

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The 52 on the number suggests that it is masquerading as one of the Br52s:

 

Liliput L131523 H0 Tender locomotive BR 52 of DB DB III | Conrad.com

I wonder how they are fitting this film into the Indiana Jones timeline; the Crystal Skull was set after WW2 and Harrison Ford isn't getting any younger. Perhaps this is for a flaschback scene as there have been leaked photos of stunt doubles in 'young Indy' masks...

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There are no shortage of real German steam locos in Germany for the film-makers to use - even a streamlined Pacific, dozens of Class 50 2-10-0s like the one shown above (in Austria too) but when realism is low on the list and saving money is more important, a 9F on the NYMR who can let you use the whole railway looks very attractive - good news for NYMR as well, of course!

At least the RPSI restored 184 to look the part for Mr Connolly, who DID do his own stuns!

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This reminded me of an event that happened in the filming of the excellent Private Schulz.

Michael Elphick, as Schulz, and Ian Richardson, as Major Neuheim, were required to be filmed, from a distance, appearing to be on foot in the foothills of the Alps, somewhere in Austria.

It was felt that could be be done adequately in a Scottish glen, so they set off up there. Schulz and Neuheim were in full uniform and walking along one side of the valley, with the rest of the crew on the other side - by means of signals, they managed to take a few shots before a drizzly shower closed in the visibility for a while. As they waited for it to clear, sheltering under a child's pink umbrella, two hikers appeared in the distance, unable to see the film crew, because of the rain.

As the hikers approached them, they felt it necessary to speak, and possibly to offer some sort of explanation.

Then, they discovered that the hikers were actually German and seemed content to carry on as though it was a  completely normal thing. Pleasantries were exchanged and the hikers went on their way.

image.jpeg.c96e9a702749548cbe836cafd8f91d99.jpeg

It's a great shame that the encounter wasn't recorded on film.

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1 hour ago, leslie10646 said:

There are no shortage of real German steam locos in Germany for the film-makers to use - even a streamlined Pacific, dozens of Class 50 2-10-0s like the one shown above (in Austria too) but when realism is low on the list and saving money is more important, a 9F on the NYMR who can let you use the whole railway looks very attractive - good news for NYMR as well, of course!

At least the RPSI restored 184 to look the part for Mr Connolly, who DID do his own stuns!

A potential 'problem' with that might be the portrayal of the swastika on the smoke deflector.

There might be some ways round the restrictions in Germany, but it might just be felt easier to not do it there?

It might also be felt that, for international audiences, the use of the symbol may be more important to the narrative than the use of the right locomotive?

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They don't have to go to germany for a Class 52,the Nene Valley has one.Ironically it appeared in a series on British technology in WW11,with two British scientists on their way to the states with a Magnatron valve catching a train with it at the head.Classic ! 600 odd operational locos in the UK and they plump for the most inappropriate.Andy.

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