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Dingles' Workspace, or the Dining Room Table

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]4642[/ATTACH] beautiful! any chance of a video clip of your stock on the move please?

 

Sorry, cannot help with that one. Hidden-Agenda, I have been known to mix the two! Some very interesting rolling stock on some of the broad gauge lines.

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Talking about mixing broad & narrow, this brake van was inspired by a pair running on the SLNCC. They were used mainly on cattle trains, with a seperate compartment for Drovers. One of my favourite wagons. SLNCC Drovers brake.jpg It is a bit narrower than the prototype, with centre buffers, but I like to think that I captured the spirit of the real one. Tis no great thing of beauty, but mine own. Regards Ken

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Any of you boys running 6 wheel rolling stock? How do you get them round tight curves! I have used a system called the "Cleminson" underframe on mine. I built a WCR six wheel brake, here is a picture of the underframe.

wcr brake.jpg

 

Also a couple of simpified earlier systems.

cleminson.jpg

 

Regards Ken

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  • 2 weeks later...

I decided to go for the S&S Passenger Brake, as it has such complex panelling! Glutton for punishment. Each glazed panel has to be painted, then glazing and inner retaining panel fitted. This picture taken, waiting for undercoat on L.H. end of body to dry. Door is mor or less finished. Bottom runner retainer will be fitted when body has been painted and door finally put in place. s&s pass brake.jpg

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Hi Dingle, very nice work. Do you use a scroll saw for cutting it all out?

 

Hello Dave. Most of the work was done with my trusty fretsaw. It has been a good friend over many years, involved in countless items of rolling stock. Here are a pair of early T&D carriages it helped me with. Regards Ken

7T & 11T.jpg

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The two windows in the body are now in place. First the clear plastic was cut slightly oversize, then strips of card the same thickness was glued around the glazing, then a square of card, cut to cover the window & strips was held over the hole in the body, pencilled round the hole, and cut out. This provides a nice neat window frame when the window is fitted in place. Next comes the roof. I have found the best way is to use planks, just like the real thing. This will be covered with a sheet of curtain lining. This will be stuck to the planks with a 50/50 mix of wood glue & water. Once dry, it will be painted. brake2.jpg

The brick is there to press down on the planks whilst they stick.

brake.jpg

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Guest hidden-agenda

I love watching this stuff being built i often wondered about building some oo scale wagons in timber to get the correct look to them.

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So, I finished planking the roof, then glued the cotton curtain lining in place. This was cut slightly oversize to start with. The roof was lightly sanded, and given a coat of the 50/50 mix woodglue & water. The lining was laid in place, and given another coat of mix. Left to dry overnight, a third coat of mix was added. When dry, the excess lining was trimmed away, the lamp tops, cut from dowelling were added, then the roof was painted with Dulux emulsion paint. I buy the little tester pots, these do several vehicles, roofs & underframes. Body painting was completed, using Humbrol enamel. I try not to use an undercoat, as too much painting soon fills up the plank scoring. The doors were fitted in place, and the bottom runners were added, to keep the doors in place. These were painted, and the van is more or less finished.

s&s pass brake 2.jpg

If you fancy having a go at some of this S&S stock, I would recommend the book in the photo. Lots of pictures and drawings to work from. 'Tis no great thing of beauty, but mine own.

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Guest hidden-agenda

I like this especially as your working with timber and the end result is eye catching well done.How do you do the couplings?

Regards Gareth.

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I like this especially as your working with timber and the end result is eye catching well done.How do you do the couplings?

Regards Gareth.

I cut 3/4ins by 1/2ins. slices from a flat sheet of brass. Drill a central hole for a 2mm set screw. This screw goes through the buffer beam to hold the coupling in place and is soldered to the brass slice. Then a short piece of 10mm copper pipe is soldered over the set screw, to the brass. A coach bolt is cut short to fit inside the copper tube, and a hole is drilled through the pipe into the coach bolt shank. Finally a hook bent up from a piece of copper wire is araldited into the hole. This holds the bolt head in place. I tried to solder the whole lot, but found it all fell to pieces! So use the araldite. Cost? about 30pence. A proper centre buffer is about £2-00. rgards Ken

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have started on the CVR 1st class coach, pictured earlier. The drawing I am working from, shows this coach had two compartments, one about one third of the coach had standard upholstered benches along the sides, the other, larger comp. had 8 armchairs, described as "Library chairs". So, surely not for the Hoi Poloi. Must have been built for a special type of traveller. Perhaps for the Directors of the Railway? Can any of you boys enlighten me? Regards Ken

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  • 3 weeks later...

Working on a couple of Cork & Muskerry Rly convertible vans. Used for dry goods and/or livestock. The door control gear is a bit unconventional, but it works for me, as the loading ramps are hinged at the bottom. c&m pair.jpg

 

Next on the blocks will be a Cork, Bandon & South Coast Rly. brake van.

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