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Carting the turnips, 2003-6

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These pictures were taken during the last few years of the beet ("turnip!") trains.

 

The short lived containers feature, as of course does the Indian Summer of the 121 class!

 

And views at Cherryville of NIRs 112, then on a several-year-long sojourn on IE.

 

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Not a chance these will all be the right way up, but c'est la vie.....

 

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Wellington bridge 121 class - only 134 and 124 were left in use. This was their beet swansong.

 

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A four wheeled turnip-tin.

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A bogie, or gourmet, turnip tin.

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And not a label on either to say how many zillion calories of sugar was in the contents. I'll tell the helfin safety people.

 

 

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This what the combined efforts of 124, a 141 and twenty two loaded turnip tins did to two 10c coins. My life savings squashed. At least this one can't be the wrong way up.

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These pictures were taken during the last few years of the beet ("turnip!") trains.

 

The short lived containers feature, as of course does the Indian Summer of the 121 class!

 

And views at Cherryville of NIRs 112, then on a several-year-long sojourn on IE.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23152[/ATTACH]

 

Not a chance these will all be the right way up, but c'est la vie.....

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23153[/ATTACH]

 

Wellington bridge 121 class - only 134 and 124 were left in use. This was their beet swansong.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23153[/ATTACH]

 

image_2.jpg

 

A four wheeled turnip-tin.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23155[/ATTACH]

 

A bogie, or gourmet, turnip tin.

image_3.jpg

 

And not a label on either to say how many zillion calories of sugar was in the contents. I'll tell the helfin safety people.

image_3.jpg

 

This what the combined efforts of 124, a 141 and twenty two loaded turnip tins did to two 10c coins. My life savings squashed. At least this one can't be the wrong way up.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23157[/ATTACH]

 

image_2.jpg

 

image_3.jpg

 

image.jpg

Turned

image 2.jpg

Edited by DiveController
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lovely stuff!!! all lost now such a pity, great times!!:((

 

Isn't beet coming back next year, or did I get that wrong. Or are there no factories, wagons or baby beets left?

 

One hears talk of it, and I think there is a trial crop in Co Cork somewhere. But IE scrapped wagons, sidings and everything rail related as quick as they possibly could to avoid involvement in the future!

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One hears talk of it, and I think there is a trial crop in Co Cork somewhere. But IE scrapped wagons, sidings and everything rail related as quick as they possibly could to avoid involvement in the future!

I thought as much:facepalm: They got rid of the bogie beet wagons also? Weren't they brand new? They must have had another purpose, surely?

Edited by DiveController
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One hears talk of it, and I think there is a trial crop in Co Cork somewhere. But IE scrapped wagons, sidings and everything rail related as quick as they possibly could to avoid involvement in the future!

 

And just what were IÉ supposed to do? Store wagons for ten years just in case someone might decide to resume growing beet. And what benefit would a siding in Wellingtonbridge be for beet being grown in 'Co Cork somewhere'? And where would the crop be processed - all the factories have been demolished (by their owners, not by IÉ)? If beet does come back in a substantial way, then it would seem likely that a new factory, or factories would be built in the beet growing area (s), not in a location requiring rail haulage of the raw product. And in any case is the 'Co Cork somewhere' location anywhere near a rail line?

 

Dive, the 'bogie beet wagons' were not new. They were existing 42' 9" container flat wagons on which 40 ft containers were mounted. Again, the containers were not new but were acquired secondhand and received some minor modifications (internal bracing and alerations to doors). I'm not sure what happened to the wagons, possibly some are in traffic on liner trains, but I'd suggest that the containers were probably withdrawn.

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Spot on JS. Wouldn't be that difficult to acquire a few 40 foot containers and repeat the butchery of 10 years ago to make bogie beet wagons. I'll check me photos tomorrow, but I'm sure most of them (aside from the older ones with continental bogies) are still rolling around.

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]23204[/ATTACH]

 

Sigh, yet another model to try and convince my colleages to engage with.... :)

 

Question if you please. Were these double height beat wagons built by recycling bodies from open bulleids by placing one body on top of another on a longer chassis possibly also recycled from precious use, or were they a new build?

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Question if you please. Were these double height beat wagons built by recycling bodies from open bulleids by placing one body on top of another on a longer chassis possibly also recycled from precious use, or were they a new build?

 

By the mid eighties there were many surplus 12' wheelbase 20' container flats with floors in the 60's/70's that were only suitable for carrying 8' high containers. Some had even been built with oil bearings.

 

The 8'6" high container was almost universal at that stage. The 22'9 skeletal flat was built the carry 20' x 8'6" containers.

 

The wagon underframes were overhauled in Limerick wagon works and the bodies made from two old Bullied wagon bodies assembled by a private contractor in Limerick Junction loco shed.

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The bodies were placed on 22'9" flats?

 

The converted 20' flat wagons were from the series 25436 - 25983. These had been introduced in 1966 and had a 12' 0" wheelbase, weighed 8 tons and had a capacity of 20 tons and were vacuun braked. Unlike later series of four-wheel container flats these were fitted with steel floors. See thread from Mayner: http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/showthread.php/3099-CIE-25436-25982-Series-Flat-Wagon for details of his model of this type of wagon.

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The converted 20' flat wagons were from the series 25436 - 25983. These had been introduced in 1966 and had a 12' 0" wheelbase, weighed 8 tons and had a capacity of 20 tons and were vacuun braked. Unlike later series of four-wheel container flats these were fitted with steel floors. See thread from Mayner: http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/showthread.php/3099-CIE-25436-25982-Series-Flat-Wagon for details of his model of this type of wagon.

Thanks, I had noted that series of wagons had steel floors, over 500 of them, but didn't realize that they were subsequently converted to double beets. I had previously assumed that the height of the 11817-14672 series of Bulleid corrugated opens had been doubled but these were on a 10' wheelbase and had a capacity of 12 tons. Now that I delve through 3rd edition of locomotives and rolling stock of IR & NIR by a certain author, I see that 166 of them were converted in 1985 to the 28501-28665 series of double beets on the 12' 25436- flat chassis, two bodies from the 11817- series wagons with a capacity of 19 tons. I presume the additional length in the body would have allowed additional length to brace the double height body appropriately.

Mayner's flats look fantastic but came out just before I came back in to modeling so they didn't make it onto my radar. I'm not sure they're available anymore :(

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