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Where does one start.

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joegriffin1984
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Welcome to the hobby Joe!!

 

From experience, I think you might find the hornby stuff limiting in time. I'd recommend adding to your track and maybe trying out some peco code 100 flex track and points to grow your layout.

There are some great track plans here sorted by available space

 

http://www.freetrackplans.com/Layout-Plans.php

 

Any any questions at all - just ask :)

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Welcome to the hobby Joe!!

 

From experience, I think you might find the hornby stuff limiting in time. I'd recommend adding to your track and maybe trying out some peco code 100 flex track and points to grow your layout.

There are some great track plans here sorted by available space

 

http://www.freetrackplans.com/Layout-Plans.php

 

Any any questions at all - just ask :)

 

 

I have to agree with Stephen that's the ways to go but stay clear of hornby track use peco instead :)

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Welcome Joe, there's a lot of experienced helpful members here. As they've said just ask.

I found it's best to avoid nailing or glueing down your track for a while, as this allows you to move things around a bit and find what works best for you, as you increase your rolling stock etc. Most layouts fall under point A to B linear type, or circular type layouts. As said before, a lot depends on your available space. Flexi-track allows for smoother (less sharp), more realistic curves, but involves cutting the track to length which is a little bit more work. Long coaches don't look very realistic on tight turns, as they can overhang the track and even uncouple or de-rail in some circumstances (at least on OO gauge track anyway).

Edited by djkonore
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Thanks for the replies everyone. Regarding space I can stretch to the size of the hornby trackmat for the time been. Ive decided to make my own layout with possibly 2 loops and a few sidings. Rolling stock will be mixed between old and new. My next train will be the intercity 125. Anyone around Dublin selling some track.. let me know! Bear in mind that this is all new to me so be prepared for a lot of questains over the next few weeks.

 

Joe

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They key is to take it slow and steady. The hornby stuff and track is great to help you figure out what you like / what bores or interests you, and to allow you dream of what maybe one day you can build :) For me, 90% of the fun of this hobby is all the mental planning :):)

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like the Bos said, take your time . look at as many layouts as you can, track plans are great for ideas but remember its your layout, so..get a pen and paper and do a few sketches--mistakes here can be erased! as conor said dont glue or nail anything down yet. welcome to the world of nutters!!:)

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Peco Setrack system http://www.anyrail.com/system-specific4/h0_peco-setrack/h0_peco-setrack_en.html would be a good option before moving to flexible track. The Setrack is fully compatible with Streamline and points andd crossings are pretty good.

 

if you are running large locos and passenger coaches its probably best to go for larger radius curves for both appearence and smooth running than those supplied with the set.

 

John

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The Hornby track mat is a great base to start a beginer layout . it will get you used to setting up it needs some very basic skills to put together and more importantly it will be fun to use

 

I would agree. I started back into the hobby with the Hornby Mixed freight set, and the track mat is great for getting a feel for track laying in general.

The Hornby points can be a bit iffy but the rest of their track is fine for general use, when I started my attic layout I used Peco points and relegated the Hornby ones to the lesser used sidings.

 

Like Mayner said be careful with tight curves when running long locos and coaches, the 2 outer curves on the track mat are fine, but longer stock will struggle with the tightest curve.

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