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Breaking in new models

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Chevron
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Hi Chevron, sorry I won't be much help with this for you, but I know there's no restrictors on models, that I know of, but what model is it & what type of controller are you using, it's possible the loco is set at a slow speed, it dos'nt sound like a serious issue, one of the experts on here will have all the answers for you soon enough, if it was a Honda 750cc you'er on about, well that would be right down my street,

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Generally, I 'burn in ' new models on DC for 30-45 minutes in each direction, half at half speed, then half that at full, then the same in reverse, before fitting a chip.

 

Check you have't shunt speed set, and verify the controller voltage, start voltage and speed steps on the chip?

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Generally, I 'burn in ' new models on DC for 30-45 minutes in each direction, half at half speed, then half that at full, then the same in reverse, before fitting a chip.

 

Check you have't shunt speed set, and verify the controller voltage, start voltage and speed steps on the chip?

 

so 15-20 mins half speed forward then 15-20 mins full speed forward then 15-20 mins half speed reverse and 15-20 mins full speed reverse should break it in?

 

 

its a dc model and have no idea how to open it up to check the motor lol

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Is there a general rule to break in new models. as like with new motor bikes is there restrictors on them or they stay slow till broken in?

 

my new engine is very slow even at full speed on my basic hornby controller.

 

You didn't state which locomotive but Bachmann/Murphy locomotives such as the 141/181s require running in without a load at a moderate speed for about an hour in each direction (2 hours running) per the instruction sheet that comes with the model.

 

Moderate speed is probably open to interpretation but I usually run mine in at 55-60% power of a standard 16V basic controller (based on nothing other than my own judgement). This allow the gear train to 'bed in'. For any given power setting, if you time a lap of an oval or any distance you will notice that the locomotive is 'lapping' more quickly after 30 minutes or so than when you put it on.

 

It is also not recommended (per that manufacturer) to chip the loco until it has been run in. I suspect it doesn't do anything good for the decoder (although it may not damage it) and any CVs that you set such as momentum, top speed etc may all change as the running characteristics of the motor it controls changes.

 

No harm to have another (similar) loco run on the same track first to assess performance. Still check track connections, clean wheels and track and all the usual stuff. Worth checking the whell alignment, running gear etc esp. if a steam to check nothing is rubbing/impinging

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It is also not recommended (per that manufacturer) to chip the loco until it has been run in. I suspect it doesn't do anything good for the decoder (although it may not damage it) and any CVs that you set such as momentum, top speed etc may all change as the running characteristics of the motor it controls changes.

 

 

It doesn't really matter if you run in a loco on DC or DCC. As Dave said, the motor receives DC current from the decoder anyway. Running in a loco on DCC won't effect the decoder. (Unless the loco drive binds right from the start and stalls the motor, but newer motors don't draw enough amps to burn out a decoder even when stalled.)

 

The reason manufacturers recommend running in before installing a decoder is to make sure it's the mechanism is in order before opening up the loco for the DCC install. If you install a decoder and it doesn't run well you have no way of knowing if it's the decoder or motor at fault!

Also when opening the loco you run the risk of damaging it and invalidating the warrantee.

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