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GNR(I) 9 Ton Van

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Brendan

 

G!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! MM 071, SSM Meabdh, Leslies IRCH standard van now the Guinness Iron Lung what next?

 

I think the GNR originally may have carried 3 containers staggered on a standard 17'11" flat, then CIE used a 20' 11'wb wagon with 3 containers in line.

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Brendan

 

G!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! MM 071, SSM Meabdh, Leslies IRCH standard van now the Guinness Iron Lung what next?

 

I think the GNR originally may have carried 3 containers staggered on a standard 17'11" flat, then CIE used a 20' 11'wb wagon with 3 containers in line.

 

Sorry, definitely two tubs to a flat!

 

The GNR carried these tubs two to a flat (with drop sides) specially built for the traffic in 1952. I have a photograph taken in UTA days of a goods with a string of them at the front.

 

My CIE flat is based on a few photos taken by Joyce Topley, a senior UTA operations manager, who photographed one of these off the tracks in the 1960s! There are clearly two tubs on the lfats involved and there is a little wlakway between them, hence the stretched prototype shown earlier.

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Very nice any idea of price and if Leslie is doing an unlettered version?

 

The MGWR had similar hard topped and convertible vans which lasted into the late 1950s with Flying Snail and numbers with an m suffix.

 

Price will not exceed £26, say €35 inclusive of postage, which is getting rather expensive - I'll probably sell them a little cheaper at exhibitions, if and when I attend them.

 

Supplying folk with an unlettered version is no problem, if they want to letter them differently. I'm not sure that the MGWR would have such a "modern" - looking van, but you are right about the convertibles, with the half-open roof.

 

Supplies are just coming on stream and I am about to send out the first examples.

 

Let me know your needs and how many, then I can adjust the prices in line with postage costs - more wagons usually go cheaper!

 

Leslie

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I'm not sure that the MGWR would have such a "modern" - looking van, but you are right about the convertibles, with the half-open roof.

 

Leslie

 

The Midland introduced IRCH wagons before the amalgamation including hard and soft topped version of the standard IRCH van, the 5 plank open and flat wagons all basically to the same design as GNR stock, in GSR/CIE days these the wagon number wagons carried an m suffix.

 

In MGWR days there was also had a Guinness (private owner?) version the modern IRCH patten van, so there is potential for MGWR/GSR/CIE versions of these wagons the only problem is in assessing the potential demand.

 

John

Edited by Mayner
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The Midland introduced IRCH wagons before the amalgamation including hard and soft topped version of the standard IRCH van, the 5 plank open and flat wagons all basically to the same design as GNR stock, in GSR/CIE days these the wagon number wagons carried an m suffix.

 

In MGWR days there was also had a Guinness (private owner?) version the modern IRCH patten van, so there is potential for MGWR/GSR/CIE versions of these wagons the only problem is in assessing the potential demand.

 

John

 

John

 

If you send me your e-mail address to lesliemcallister@aol.com - I'll send you a photo which may interest you of a certain private owner beer van. Anyone else interested can do the same - it's not on my website for fairly obvious reasons!

 

My 9 ton van is NOT an IRCH van - this one is a rebuild the GNR did 1941 right up to the end of the railway in 1957 - using existing ironwork - there were about 600 such rebuilds.

 

The IRCH van, if I am not mistaken, was a ten ton capacity van, built to Dundalk Diagram No.13 dated 1921. This is described in the wagon book as a "Standard" van, I think referring to the IRCH.

 

The good news is that it is next on my list, as I like a bit of variety in my trains! "My Man" - that is my excellent modeller - tells me he can do one fairly easily. It's slightly longer at 16ft 11ins, whereas the 9 ton job is 15ft 2ins.

 

As for doing them in different liveries - no problem, IF I can get some photographic evidence of how they were lettered! People simply didn't photograph goods trains or wagons and we are all in the debt of those who did! I buy every wagon photo I see at fairs etc - all evidence is of use!

 

By the way, doing my existing van in CIE colours is easy - we just add a snail and lightly paint out the "GN" - thats' what CIE did. They didn't last long, I suspect, as CIE had been building better steel vans for five years or so when they took over Ireland's Premier Line - there is history that they got rid of all things GNR asap!

 

Leslie

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  • 3 years later...

Leslie - I'm sure you're aware of this but just in case not - CIE's wish to eradicate GNR stuff wasn't entirely complete by the time loose coupled goods vans were all retired. I saw what at first glance looks like a "H" van, but was one of the 1954 GNR corrugated-ended standard goods vans right at the end, about 1977, in a train at Templemore. It was one of those built for cement traffic originally. By this stage it was brown and carried standard CIE roundel and standard cast CIE numberplate with "C I E" and "66N" on it.

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  • 1 month later...
Leslie - I'm sure you're aware of this but just in case not - CIE's wish to eradicate GNR stuff wasn't entirely complete by the time loose coupled goods vans were all retired. I saw what at first glance looks like a "H" van, but was one of the 1954 GNR corrugated-ended standard goods vans right at the end, about 1977, in a train at Templemore. It was one of those built for cement traffic originally. By this stage it was brown and carried standard CIE roundel and standard cast CIE numberplate with "C I E" and "66N" on it.

 

John

 

That's interesting info, to thunk that those vans lasted over thirty years.

 

Now you can understand why Mark did the Dapol banana van in brown with a CIE roundel, albeit with the "N" suffix to the number.

 

I haven't done a Dapol wagon for years, but as they offer a cheap and pretty accurate model of an Irish wagon, I am toying with the idea of doing another run of the "cement' vans, in a later CIE livery with the roundel, rather than the snail.

 

Any feedback on possible sales would be welcome! Price under £15, post paid.

 

Later today, you'll get photos of the next two PW vans!

 

Leslie

Leslie

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  • 4 weeks later...
Sorry, definitely two tubs to a flat! The GNR carried these tubs two to a flat (with drop sides) specially built for the traffic in 1952. I have a photograph taken in UTA days of a goods with a string of them at the front.

 

My CIE flat is based on a few photos taken by Joyce Topley, a senior UTA operations manager, who photographed one of these off the tracks in the 1960s! There are clearly two tubs on the flats involved and there is a little walkway between them, hence the stretched prototype shown earlier.

 

Clearly both types of wagon were in operation at various times. The O' Dea collection has an 8pm CIE goods leaving Derry in 1968 with 5 Guinness tubs spread over 2 wagons. I'm not sure of the length of these flat wagons but both have space for three Guinness tubs in line without the need to stagger them.

http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000307472

 

And to add insult to injury there's this

Drogheda A54R 17jul73 pn:dig:

Edited by DiveController
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