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KMCE

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Everything posted by KMCE

  1. KMCE

    Class 458 Build

    As a break from the 495 build, I decided to start on another locomotive. This will be my first foray into complete scratch building and have chosen the ex DSER No. 52; 4-4-2T, GSR Class 458, as a starting point. This loco class was long lived (1893 - 1955) and provided good service on the DSER section but given its life, it could reasonably appear in a wide variety locations and with different demands. Photo courtesy of the "Good Book" (Clements & Mc Mahon) I met with the good folk from the IRRS who were kind enough to give me access to the outline drawings which helped me develop up my own CAD drawings as an aid to building the loco. What is interesting is that while the IRRS drawings are dimensioned, they are not to scale, so some tweaking was required to get a more accurate drawing to work from. First thing need were the frames. While it would be nice to create the frames in total (including the projection either side of the smokebox) it was easier to separate these into two sections. Once they are put on the footplate & mounted on the frames, it will make little difference. This template was printed out and checked for scale before cutting (yes there was an earlier attempt!) Two lengths of brass are tacked together, the template stuck down and cut with the piercing saw. The result of much cutting and tidying up with files to get to this point. I decided to compensate this chassis and am following the very good directions provided in Flexichas (Mike Sharman) who outlines the various methods of providing a fully compensated chassis. In this instance, a primary compensation unit is constructed with fixed bearings able to pivot around a forward fulcrum, and balanced by the rear trailing wheels. What's nice about this is it's in the location of the firebox so seves two functions. This unit was developed around the chassis drawing and was cut in a similar fashion to the main frames. A few rivets along the bottom will provide the illusion of the firebox. This was then assembled to give: This was inserted into the frames, the unit loaded into the locobox to set the hornblocks for the front driving axle. Lots of pegs etc were needed to get the frame and compensated unit to sit correctly before fixing in the hornblocks. 8'-6" coupling rods were used to set the distance and hornblocks soldered in. From this starting point it was possible to set the trailing wheels and their respective hornblocks. Some wheels were installed to get some idea of how the rear compensating unit will operate. At present a 1.5mm rod is located in the rear of the main compensating unit, which will pivot around the cross bar(?) which will then bear down on the trailing wheel axle. A vertical structure will be needed to make up the difference in height between these two units. Ride height can then be adjusted by tweaking the bar until the unit sits at the right height. The main compensation unit will also provide a good location for the gearbox and motor which can be fixed to this unit. Humble beginings, but a thoroughly enjoyable learning curve and looking forward to see how this turns out. A good source of information, and inspiration, is "Scratch-Building Model Railway Tank Locomotives" by Simon Bolton. Excellent read, even if you are not going to build your own locomotive - he takes away the mystery (and fear) of scratch building and is certainly influencing me here. More soon. Regards, Ken
  2. KMCE

    Class 458 Build

    Little bit of work last night. Built the compensation bar between the sub frame and the rear axle. Tricky little bugger to put together - all parts are very close & soldering led to things moving around enough to cause me to revert to my collection of expletives! Simple in theory, but tricky to execute. How it operates Once the bogey and front driver are installed, this compensation unit will set the height for the rear axles and let them move around depending on track conditions. the range of articulation can be seen from the two photos. Just to put this in scale - the distance between the frames is about 17mm. Working on the bogey at the moment and will post some photos on progress shortly. Regards, Ken
  3. KMCE

    Class 495 Build

    Right........ Now that I have a properly printed model it's time to get started on construction. As mentioned in the earlier thread, I was proposing to use the high level kit as the chassis under the printed model, so made a start on the kit. The kit has parts for OO, EM & P4, so there are a few additional etches. Frames cut out of fret and bearings set in rear axle position – hornblocks for forward axle. I built the chassis up using the P4 components in the kit to arrive here: However........ Due to the 21mm gauge there was a lot of slack between the wheels and frames which was causing problems with how the loco sat on the track - the side play was excessive and to be honest the chassis was not the right shape anyway, so I decided to start again and build my own frames. More reflective of the actual loco, and allows me to correct the spacing to prevent excess sideways play. We get this: Great - right shape, compensation in, ride height set - now for rods. Ahh....wheel base in the kit is longer than 495! Thus coupling rods are no use, so I had to make my own. After using all the expletives I know (many times) and three goes later, we now have coupling rods - sort of! Not as elegant as the etched ones, but the difference in length can clearly be seen. Original RTR rods top, kit etched second, mine bottom. No lubricating pot, but I may be able to bodge something together. Now we are starting to get to a point where cylinders and connecting rods can be added, brakes fashioned, pick ups added and hopefully we will have a completed chassis. I hope to use parts of the kit to add detail to all of this, particularly in the cab area which will be very visible. More later.....
  4. KMCE

    Class 495 Build

    Well.... Touched base with Chris in High Level and it turns out I have the wrong final drive gear - it should have 20 teeth, mine has 23, so new one on its way in the post. Good time to put this one to one side for a short while and start something new. Eoin, Many thanks for that link - I got the book. That chap takes painting seriously!!! 😜 It'll take some time before I get to that level, if ever, but fascinating information none the less. Regards, Ken
  5. KMCE

    Class 800 Gauge O CNC Parts

    That makes sense! The cylinder positions are as below if that helps with the centre cylinder well forward to allow connection to the front axle. Another question is - are the wheels quartered, or is the system set up on 120deg given the three cylinders? Eoin - How are you setting it up on the model?
  6. KMCE

    Class 800 Gauge O CNC Parts

    True, but what is more interesting is that the centre cylinder operates on the front axle which has the crank and valve eccentrics built in. The axle also has associated counterweights take up this imbalance . Thus, why weights on the crank and wheel - unless the front one is cosmetic?
  7. KMCE

    Class 495 Build

    Eoin, Many thanks for the links. There are a few images in there which will provide some indication of how she would have looked both new and old. Not having tried any lining, this should be quite a challenge..... JHB, Really appreciate the input, and I would agree that what ever the finish, a heavy level of weathering and toning down of the paintwork will be required. She will make a poor looking relative to the better looking locos to come. However, it should provide some very atmospheric photos with some heavily weathered and run down wagons. Will keep you posted on progress. Regards, Ken
  8. KMCE

    Class 495 Build

    Yes. The note on the drawing I have from IRRS states: "Purchased from Messrs Allman & Co. Ltd, Bandon for use on Anderson's and Victoria Quays" And while I have you, you being the Oracle on all things Livery, I have a note from the "Good Book" (Clements & Mc Mahon) that it maintained it's manufacturers paint scheme of Olive Green, lined in black & yellow with red frames. Whilst the photo is in B&W, there is no indication of colour variations or lining? Your thoughts? Ken
  9. KMCE

    barrow street

    I'm sure we can forgive leaving out the underground car park!!! 😉 Looking fantastic as always - incredible level of modelling. Thanks for sharing.
  10. KMCE

    Class 495 Build

    Progress for today. The new rods were binding slightly, so it was back onto the loco box to move the hornblocks properly in line. The axle posts allow the connecting rods set the correct distance and then its a matter of soldering in the horn blocks again. Relatively easily sorted, and now the chassis rolls properly without binding. Brakes were added from the kit and modified to suit the actual loco. Brakes are fixed to the 1.5mm crossing rod, which means they can swing out of the way to allow access to the wheels, while normally they can sit close to the wheel as per the prototype. Sliding rod supports from the kit were split and soldered into position using the cylinders as a guide. Next up was the gearbox which is formed from the kit etches folded up. All holes need to be gently opened with broaches to the correct sizes for shafts and bushes. Bushes were soldered in for the drive axle and assembly can commence. And this is where we hit a snag. When assembling the gearbox onto the drive shaft, it appears the gear on the drive axle (large one above with brass core) is a fraction to large to allow it mesh with the idler. No sequence of assembly allowed any space, so I think it will need a call to Chris in High Level Kits for advice. Gearbox connection to the drive axle - less the drive gear. This may need some lateral support as the space between the frames is much more than the kit envisaged, so without some fixing, the gearbox could slip. Perhaps the motor fixed in the boiler may prevent movement - I'll see how it goes. Continued on with other work such as motor into the boiler area, opening of the footplate to allow the gearbox through, and adding the cylinders. We are getting to a rather nice looking loco.... The wider frames move the cylinders out which gives a rather strong looking stance - shot from above showing how the cylinders sit in relation to the footplate. Very pleased with progress & its now starting to look more like the prototype. Ken
  11. KMCE

    3D printing + DIY CAD

    Re-printed model arrived. Printed properly this time Now on with the build!!
  12. KMCE

    murrayec's Projects

    Now that is a stunningly impressive model and associated talent bringing it together!! Well done Eoin.
  13. KMCE

    3D printing + DIY CAD

    Quick update: Dropped a note to Shapeways pointing out the broken parts on the model, and in fairness to them they responded quickly. In fairness, you cannot complain with that level of service - I'm very impressed. Looking forward to take two!!
  14. KMCE

    3D printing + DIY CAD

    Well...... Model went to Shapeways for printing. The system wouldn't accept the buffers, as the edge was too thin for their printers, so just left it with blank buffer beams - I can always add buffers later. € 58 lighter and 12 days later, a model was delivered to the door!! Cab roof and back were printed separately to allow me to provide detail with out the keyhole surgery!! Now the erudite among you might have noticed the the buffer beam is incomplete / broken, and the chimney appears to have been printed inside the smoke box! So a friendly chat with Shapeways will be needed to see what happened. They are not major issues, but other details appear to be good, so what's with these two errors? As for detail, rivets on the tank body did not render, however on the smoke box face and cab made the grade. It appears fine detail will render on flat surfaces, but not on curved shapes. A light coat of primer may help to raise more detail, as it is a little difficult to see the detail given the material its printed in. All in all, pleased with the result for the effort put in. Let see how this looks with some paint and sitting on a chassis. I may start a separate thread on the build of 495 rather than continuing here as the discussion has moved on from 3D printing. More soon......
  15. KMCE

    Query re GSR Drewry railcars

    JHB et al, My search for information on this type of railcar has led me back here - should have started here 🤔 I'm in the process of building one of these rail cars and am using the Worsley Works Kits to produce a broad gauge version and am running into trouble with the chassis, as the available photos do not provide enough detail. Progress to date: Scratch building aid kit as delivered (x2) Removing narrow gauge handles prior to splitting the body to insert the additional window (hence the kit x 2) Panel inserted and body made up. Scrap brass used to hold the inset section. Basic chassis made to set levels (wrong wheels - correct on order) but now need need a little more information to develop a more accurate chassis / underframe assembly. Is the information noted above still available?? Here's hoping... Ken
  16. KMCE

    3D printing + DIY CAD

    Hello MikeO, I am planning on using the High Level Pug Chassis - http://173.254.28.51/~highlev3/chris/Pages/pugpage.html I will need to make some mods to this kit to allow for the 21mm, as it only allows for the 18.83mm P4. It may simply be spacers between the wheels and chassis and build chassis as per the kit, or introduce new cross-members in the kit to build out for the 21mm. It may be simpler to use spacers. The 3D model is nearing completion, and I may put it out to Shapeways to get their call on whether it will work and costs etc. Ken
  17. KMCE

    Benaughlin new layout

    Hello Derek, That's a cracking start to your layout. By coincidence, I also used the Florencecourt station house in my Port Cumtha layout due to its small size and good detail. I modeled it as it is now, rather than how it was, as in my case the layout is fictional (hence the name!). I'm working in 4mm, however given the amount of card cut for the various buildings on my layout, that cutting machine you mentioned, does look interesting and may have saved my fingers!! Good luck with the layout - one to watch. Ken
  18. KMCE

    3D printing + DIY CAD

    Getting the hang of this 3D CAD. Progress to date. Few more bits and pieces, and we may have model to print!!
  19. KMCE

    21mm track question

    Hello Robert, The sleeper length is 36mm (9ft) if I recall correctly. In terms of setting the track out, templot is what is generally used. It's free to download and use, however it is a bit clunky to operate initially. You need to set up the scale you want (5'3" gauge is there) which sets out all the necessary parameters to allow you set out sleepers, track lengths, and points etc. For spacing, I bought the gauges from Scalefour society (there may be others?) which are not expensive - you could make your own, but for the sake of c. £5, is it worth the effort? Hope this helps, Ken
  20. KMCE

    Class 800 Drawings

    Looking at the locomotive drawings etc in Resources prompted me to dig out the drawings I developed for the Class 800 from the original. These were done the old way of pen and ink on the drawing board, as CAD was in it's infancy and cost more that a small house to buy, never mind the computer cost. I worked from the original drawing I requested from IE many moons ago. The drawing was taped to the board, and A1 negatives created from it - there is a huge amount of information on that old drawing, so I took the layers off and made multiple drawings to clarify the detail. I don't have access to the resources section, but perhaps it's a little early yet as I need to get these scanned / digitised with the intention of bringing them into CAD. Once they are scanned, perhaps they can be added to the resources section and will be available if anyone wants a copy. When brought into CAD, we will have more definitive drawings to work with. ** Edit Should have added this one as well. It is incomplete but when put with the drawing on the smokebox it provides the detail of the inside motion and fire tubes back to the boiler. Ken .
  21. There is the option of painting white circles on the tender and smoke box and run her as an oil burner, post-war?
  22. KMCE

    Class 800 Drawings

    Eoin, Thanks for that - as mentioned, I want to get these scanned so they are flat and in proper digital format. Once they are in digital format, they are available to anyone who wants a copy as they should be dimensionally correct. Hopefully, I can then import them to CAD and draw them up when I have time. On the issue of sourcing drawing, I am looking for a few as I would like to build some ex DSER / GSR locomotives: Class 423: 2-4-0T Class 434: 2-4-2T Class 850: 2-6-2T Does anyone have a copy, or know who I can get in touch with to source a copy? All assistance gratefully accepted.
  23. KMCE

    David's Workbench

    That came up really well. Well done Sir! Ken
  24. KMCE

    3D printing + DIY CAD

    I have a lot of experience with 2D CAD as I use for work (the real work!), and downloaded the full version of AutoCAD on trial to try the 3D version. The commands are generally the same with the addition of stretching or providing depth to shapes. In a few hours this evening, I have come up with this as a first project. Looks basic enough so far, however it is possible to build up the elements in stages and bring them together. Boiler elements are dark grey, tank and chimney are light grey, cab elements are mid green, and by chance the footplate is in eau de nil. By doing it this way, it will be possible to deconstruct the model into component parts and print as a kit and assemble as one would a standard kit - it would be necessary to provide some additional material to line up parts etc. However given the size of this thing, it probably could be printed as a single unit. As to the costs - the eye watering bit is the cost of AutoCAD (€260 per month!), the DLP printer noted above is c. € 500 and resin is about €75 per litre. I terms of turning out models, what would make life much easier would be proper dimensioned drawings of the prototype (perhaps IE could help here?) which would reduce drawing time. At present, I'm trying to measure from an existing model, which is not really an accurate way of doing things! If I can convince the accountant that my CAD package is out of date and I need to upgrade, "there may be trouble ahead". (oo00OO...now why would an engineering company need a 3D printer?.....) Answers on a post card to the usual address.... Ken
  25. KMCE

    3D printing + DIY CAD

    This is an area that is piquing my interest at the moment. I follow this guy on Youtube & he recently demonstrated a DLP (Digital Light Processing) 3D printer The results look excellent, however the size of model being produced would be quite small - not an issue if you were to make a series of parts and assemble as a kit afterwards. This printer appears to be selling for less than €500 which (for those of us who remember) was the cost of inkjet printers not so long ago! Like inkjet though, it appears the resin is where the cost is c.€ 75 per litre which may make things a little expensive. It may not be the quality of RTR tooling, however for small and rarer items, this is starting to look a little more economic. Ken
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