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KMCE

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Everything posted by KMCE

  1. Murph, Printer is an AnyCubic Photon Mono X. The vee is not touching the plastic diretly, the nearest contact being the chairs last timber back; thus with a quick solder, there does not appear to be any deformation from the heat. Vee is soldered in before wing rails are added. I was originally concerned with the lack of support for the vee & wing rails, but given the support from the chairs, there does not appear to be any deflection; then axle loading at 4mm is not huge. Hope that helps. Ken
  2. It's already possible to change check rail clearances under the real tab, and scrolling down to "adjust check rails". It's a bit fiddly, but possible. I soldiered on with the development of the points and now have a short 1:6 point c. 260mm, an A6 (300mm) and a B6 (325mm) which have also been upgraded around the frog. The next iteration of the frog allowed for a small amount of copperclad to allow soldering of the vee. However, this copperclad was not providing much benefit, so I elminated it and can now build with the only soldering needed is the crossing vee, which is done in situ, so no jigs are needed. This also removes unnecessary cross bracing on the sleepers. There are chairs for all sleepers except for one as it is both difficult to establish the exact position of the rail and threading in the canted check /crossing rail is rather difficult. It will be possible to add a cosmetic chair later, but missing one chair is not a big deal. Completed A6 point - some minor tweaking needed at the blades / rail for the diverging rail, as this is slightly under gauge - next iteration should sort that. The B6 point is operating perfectly and all wagons & more importantly 6-wheelers glide through on the main and diverging way. These are big points however. For comparison, below is the B6 point vs a Peco SL92 OO small radius point. Next up will be to look at a curved point / crossover as I need one for the extended Wicklow station layout. Ken
  3. I'll be there, and will have the armoured train with me on display. Ken
  4. Really like the look of this. Nice option to use the separate sleeper & chair which would be fine for most applicaitons - would it be suitable for P4 I wonder; he appears to be working on this though. The solution of printed chairs for the crossing vee of the point would make it easiser than the solution I am working with. I have found with the fixed chairs printed to the sleeper is quite strong and the gauge is very accurate however it's a bit fiddly completing the vee. Even so the copperclad solution I'm using allows me complete a point in c. 1 hour. I do like the option that he can generate any track formation, whereas, my solution is fixed at the moment for a B6 point & straight lenghts - Must work harder I may partake in the templot option & see how it works; don't know about you guys, but I do find Templot rather challenging for anything other that the most basic patterns. Worth a go! Ken
  5. Very Nice! Everything well blended together to develop the scene. Super work. Ken
  6. He must have had a good imagination. The layout for the Brick Factory outside Rathnew in Wicklow also had this arrangement. I assume it allowed a loco to sit on the siding to allow the siding be fillled by a mainline train and thus shunted afterwards? Seems too short for a passing loop. This could qualify as a minimally interesting track layout with an interesting industiral setting? More here - https://heritage.wicklowheritage.org/places/rathnew/the_rathnew_brickworks
  7. KMCE

    KMCE's Workbench

    But of course - Victorian naturally!! This is the old Militia Barracks located adjacent to the reminants of Murrough Station in Wicklow. This backdrop was developed from a series of photos I took a few weeks back of what's left of the old Murrough station house, station wall & Militia Barracks, now called Marine house (currently a non-denominational primary school). The houses just visible over the wall are new builds, but by just keeping the roofs, I can maintain a timeless backdrop. Another shelftop layout being developed to take trial the printed track etc.
  8. KMCE

    KMCE's Workbench

    Yes, this was noted in the 21mm survey on RTR track. I have managed to develop a print for 21mm which with a limited amount of work will provide 21mm track without the need for all the soldering & associated track gauges. Need to develop up the points a little further berfore they are a simple solution for 21mm development.
  9. KMCE

    KMCE's Workbench

    Busy yard in the evening sunshine......
  10. Philip, I use the Valejo air range (great paint BTW) and always thin the paint - using straight from the bottle in my experience will not end well. The other thing to note is air pressure - I normally work with 20 -25 psi max with an absolute minimum paint delivery rate. It takes time to paint as the amount of paint is minimal, but you have much more control over the painting proces. This also works well for weathering once painting is complete. Just my experience so use as necesary! Ken
  11. KMCE

    KMCE's Workbench

    Some progress on the convertible wagon. Very pleased with how these are turning out - some light sand blasting followed by a coat of paint should help.
  12. KMCE

    KMCE's Workbench

    Little bit of progress. Wagon lightly sandblasted prior to a dusting of paint to get a feel for how the detail will work. Coming up rather nicely.
  13. KMCE

    KMCE's Workbench

    Given the success of the cattle wagon, I had drawings from HMRS for the DWWR Convertible wagon, which was quite easy to translate to CAD (particuarly for a model build). With the experience and methodology used for the cattle wagon, it was possible to develop a basic model in 3D for one of these wagons. Again run through the printer we get: There is a some tidying up needed on these models. The model is supported on the build plate by an network of thin supports (see below) - this is to ensure that each layer, particulary new layers are lifted of the base film without distorting. These supports leave very small marks that need cleaning up before the model can progress. Anyway, on to building chassis for these wagons. Should keep me busy for a while!!
  14. KMCE

    KMCE's Workbench

    Pop, Up to now, I had not considered printing as a venture, but if people are interested in the body only, they would be immediately available for order. I would need to think of a price - something reasonable naturally. The cost is not in the physical printing, but in the origainal design and development. David, If one were to print a single unit at a time it takes 3 hours, but my build plate can take up to 5 wagons at a time - the time is not per unit but the build height, irrespective of the amount of material on the plate (resin SLA printing). Thus I can print 5 bodies in three hours. As mentioned above, the time is not in the printing, and as John attested above, the time is in the design of the model and running of test prints to establish a final design. What looks good in 3D CAD, even if it is to exact scale, does not always translate to a reasonable looking model. Some tweaks are needed to provide a reasonable looking model whilst maintaining strength. John, Agreed. It did not even occur to me to print a chassis for this model for P4. I am very interested in your comments regarding the ABS type of resin; so far I have used three types of resin, a translucent green as seen on other posts which provides very detailed models, but is very brittle. The standard resin (Anycubic grey) proved to be less brittle but detail was not as good. The problem with both those resins was the need to use IPA (Isopropyl Alcohol, not India Pale Ale) to clean up, which really is a pain to use and then clean afterwards. The models above were printed with the Elgoo Mars water washable resin, which I have found to have good physical properties whilst holding detail - the ability to clean up with water makes the process much eaiser. The detail on your chassis is excellent - I assume these are gauged for OO? I may look at developing a simple OO chassis for these (and others) which will be suitable for the short wheel base of earlier Irish wagons.
  15. KMCE

    KMCE's Workbench

    Thanks for the comment. For OO gauge, it would be possible, however to provide enough strength the thickness of resin would make printing for 21mm difficult, but not impossible. The overall wagon width at the axle location is c. 30 - 31mm whilst the pinpoint axle dimension is 28mm, so it would be rather close. I am a fan of the detail in the brass underframes with cast axleboxes and springs, so made sense for me. Most of my wagons are compensated as I am working to P4 standards, with the exception being the very short DW&WR ballast wagons which have a 6' wheel base. I would consider an underframe print for an OO version if there was an interest.
  16. KMCE

    KMCE's Workbench

    Some minor tweaks to the 3D model to Rev 4 to include changes to the lower straps on the uprights to more prototypical detail. Also the holes for the bars were opened up to ease the installation of same. And the advantage of printers is the ability to gerenate a train quickly. I'm planning to use brass compensated chassis for these, so there is still some work to do, but not having to do all the uprights and rivet detail on the bodies is quite a relief. Will need to add weight to the wagons bring them up to the weight of the other wagons already made. Very pleased with the results & quality of the print.
  17. KMCE

    KMCE's Workbench

    As many have noted herein, no heritage Irish train would be complete without the ubiquitous cattle wagons. I wanted to model the DSER version, alas there are very few images of these, however with a few photos and some calculations based on similar wagons, I managed to develop a suitable model. Rather than make these in brass & face the fiddly build of the uprights again & again, I looked at 3D printing them. The model progressed through various versions till we get this First model, bit to thin... Some developement through rev 2 - timber uprights were still a little thin and not enough definition on the planks..... Another revision, we get to a more presentable model: Holes included in the model did need some reaming out but make the installation of the bars easier. Some tidying up needed - more visible in the photos than on the model itself. Plan is to build a chassis in brass with some added weight to match the weight of the other wagons, but hopefully this should allow me build a rake much quicker. More as time permits.
  18. Lovely looking wagon, but then I'm kinda biased!! Key wagon to master in DSER modelling as it formed the basis of many other wagons. Nice one!!
  19. Bloody shite-hawks - they get everywhere!!
  20. Finally got around to doing some work on this layout. Many other projects, including 305mm scale have kept me busy. Got some paint onto the mineral wagons, which still need to be weathered. A little bit of gardening and weatering on the model has helped to tone it down & plant it in the secene. Still some more to do, but it's all part of the process. It should be on display in Bray on Sunday for those who can get about. Ken
  21. The Waverly does get about. Some years ago she operated off the East Coast and was operating tours from Wicklow down towards Arklow. Very nice ship!
  22. Seriously impressive fiddle yard David. Great ideas & some eclectic collections not seen elsewhere. I agree with the sentiment regarding building yourself. The realisation you can build it if you can't buy it, really opens up the older eras of the hobby. Well done & keep up the good work.
  23. Large Eire sign in Dalkey. One of many found around Ireland during the really dry spell back in 2018. Die back of vegetation due to drought highlighted these signs which date back to the "emergency". Their purpose was to provide a guide to flyers who may be "temporarily unaware of their location" particularly returning from atlantic escort duties, or to dissuade errant Luftwaffe bombing missions. Quite impressive from the air & clearly visible (on good days anyway!)
  24. Lovely looking locomotive, that said, I do have a soft spot for the 2-4-2 tanks. Really like the checkrail details on the crossover - very realistic.
  25. Whilst not exactly RTR, with some 3D modelling (should read a lot of modelling) and 3D printing, it is possible to develop a basic 45' straight, and a B6 point. Developed to P4 standards with the 1:20 incline inwards using code 75 bullhead rail results in this: Points proved to be a tricker prospect. Ensuring gauge widening, check rails, crossng vee and closure rails was a little more difficult. Easy to print a continuous line through the vee, but more challenging to get the vee in place, soldered without damaging the sleepers below. The compromise was to print a space for coppercald, cut it on the mill and use as a base for soldering everything in place. The upside of this is I only need one dropper to wire the complete frog. Once the sleepers are painted and the whole lot ballasted, this should not really be visible. As a B6 point, it c. 260mm long, so is printed in two parts as my build plate is only 190mm - not an issue as you cannot really see the separate element once completed. The reason for B6 is that I have found that locos more than 4 coupled will not go (comfortably) through anything less. They do take up space, but have a very prototypical look. This process does make it a lot easier to make a point, however the basics of point construct still apply, it just considerably reduces the amount of soldering. As chairs are printed to the correct gauge, jigs are not needed - just push in the rail as necessary. Still a work in progress as there the gauge widening on the diverging track exit is slightly tight - a minor tweak (I hope!!) to the CAD model should solve this problem. The track shown above is part of a test layout to see how well this process works and will be developed further in the layout section. More as time permits. Ken
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