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40 years on - corridor extensions using plastic and black tissue paper.

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Noel
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Earlier today while looking for one of my old Lima CIE Mk1 coaches for the other thread on Lima Murphy Models, I found the this old Triang Hornby LMS coach that trigged the memory of me trying to improve the corridor connectors back in 1975 by bodging on flexible corridor extensions.

 

Most models of BR Mk1 back then had very short corridors and large gaps, so I remember reading a "Tip" in 1974 railway modeller mag, showing how to add extensions using plasticard and black tissue paper. As a teen I bodged the mod to a few maroon LMS coaches.

 

As well as adding the flexible corridor connections I liked to be able to see through the corridor inside the coach, so cut out the ends as well.

IMG_5416.JPG

 

Looks a bit bockety now and the frame has warped over the past 40 years, but it stayed in tact.

IMG_5418.JPG

 

This really was a toy of yesteryear - crude models but back then they were the bees knees . . .

Edited by Noel
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The reason the corridor connections were modeled short of the BR Mk1s was because the prototypes were fitted with the modern pullman style connections and knuckle couplers that only became common from the Mk2s onwards. For Irish Rail they had the older suspension style as that was what all Irish stock at the time had and screw couplers.

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This really was a toy of yesteryear - crude models but back then they were the bees knees . . .

 

The Triang/Hornby Mk1 coaches have stood the test of time since they were introduced in 1962, the first scale length RTR coaches. Over the years they have gradually been improved with better roof detail, flush glazing, painted finish, correct oval buffers and decent wheels, but essentially they are the same vehicles as those produced in 1962. Until 1966 they were also produced as a pair of unassembled coaches in BR maroon, under the title CKD, meaning 'completely knocked down'. The Composite CK, Brake BSK, Buffet RMB, Sleeping Car, and the Full Brake were all available as CKD. All you needed was a small screwdriver to put them together. Much cheaper than buying two ready built ones.

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  • 2 months later...
I always thought "completely knocked down" must have been the most bizarrely odd "brand" ever!

 

Harris imported Hino trucks into Ireland in CKD form in the 60s & 70s claiming that they were assembled in Ireland rather than imported.

 

"Assembly" was basically attaching the cab to an already assembled chassis, topping up with fuel, oil and water and driving off the assembly line.

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Hornby have replaced these venerable with a newly tooled, cheap Mark I I'm their 'railroad' range over the last 18 months or so. Still an impressive production run nonetheless. The only major fudge was that the full brake was the same length as the opens, sleeper etc when in reality they were shorter. The new railroad models are quite nice by all accounts.

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