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Model paint / decals

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tonybonneyba
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Tony

 

That paint you have there looks fine

 

Many moons ago myself and a chap who drove JCB's used to service the bushings on the back-actor- I still have the drill bits and the reamers for doing the job! oh and I still have the pillar drill we used to use, at that time JCB sold the kits and one could buy paint from them for touch up??

 

Eoin

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Tony

 

That paint you have there looks fine

 

Many moons ago myself and a chap who drove JCB's used to service the bushings on the back-actor- I still have the drill bits and the reamers for doing the job! oh and I still have the pillar drill we used to use, at that time JCB sold the kits and one could buy paint from them for touch up??

 

Eoin

 

Aye, it works fantastic on the real machines, such as the Ex Nir ballast regulator I touch up some rust & scratch patches with, but because the paint was made for metal & tractors (mainly jcbs, funny enough) I have been told it will damage the plastic on the model & won't dry very well, which is why I'm looking for a model paint of RAL 1007 - 1003 (Jcb yellow).

 

The paint shop, Kelly's, in Ballynahinch do paint for JCBs for touch ups since your asking.

(Wonder if JCBs are as fun as USP 3000 C's? ;) )

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Go to your local model factors and get them to mix a spray can to the ral number, make sure to use a primer first and you ll be grand. If you do go down this route buy a respiratory mask and only spray in a well ventilated area. Also put the spray can in warm water before use.

Des at ssm or Steve at railtec may be able to help with the decals.

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Go to your local model factors and get them to mix a spray can to the ral number, make sure to use a primer first and you ll be grand. If you do go down this route buy a respiratory mask and only spray in a well ventilated area. Also put the spray can in warm water before use.

Des at ssm or Steve at railtec may be able to help with the decals.

 

Ah, thanks, I'll try get in touch with SSM, when you say Model Factors, I presume you are referring to a model or craft shop?

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What will it do to yah?

 

Weshty for you...

 

Yellow Paint-00.jpg

 

Tony

 

As far as I know cellulose paint is not used in the motor industry any more due to safety, they use a water based system now that requires an oven to set the paint hard- that's why they say the paint does not dry well if used without an oven!

 

Go for the Humbrol option

 

Eoin

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:facepalm:

 

Go on to the next page and pick no 69, which as I said above, is Ral 2004.

:dig:

Digging myself a bigger whole....

 

Ah, yes, sorry, the preview of 69 was a bit bright, but that's always the case when it comes to model pints.....

 

http://www.humbrol.com/uk-en/69-yellow-gloss-150ml-acrylic-spray-paint.html

Edited by tonybonneyba
Hit shift while typing model....
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If it's standard enamel paint, it will work fine on plastic. If it's cellulose paint (really potent chemical smell) DO NOT TOUCH it!

Is the problem with cellulose with humans, or with the model? I have some coaches that were resprayed with what I believe is cellulose paint and it seems to be fine. They are only a few months old but the plastic hasn't disintegrated yet or anything like that

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Is the problem with cellulose with humans, or with the model? I have some coaches that were resprayed with what I believe is cellulose paint and it seems to be fine. They are only a few months old but the plastic hasn't disintegrated yet or anything like that

 

Sprayed Cellulose Paint, especially the 2 pack variety,produces cyanide fumes.

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Hi DC

 

Cellulose is a fantastic paint for all materials its why most car body shops used to use it- its probably the best and its cheep

 

On the other hand its deadly to humans if it gets into the lungs- it sticks the little woolie bits together and suffocation comes on. This is why you don't see back lane car body shops any more- insurance companies and employers wont take the risk and to up-grade to the water system is to expensive for the back lane guys- what's the cost of a car oven!!

 

Eoin

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Hi DC

 

Cellulose is a fantastic paint for all materials its why most car body shops used to use it- its probably the best and its cheep

 

On the other hand its deadly to humans if it gets into the lungs- it sticks the little woolie bits together and suffocation comes on. This is why you don't see back lane car body shops any more- insurance companies and employers wont take the risk and to up-grade to the water system is to expensive for the back lane guys- what's the cost of a car oven!!

 

Eoin

 

Cellulose can be difficult to apply over some non-cellulose finishes, too.

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In the day job I spend a fair amount of time inspecting car body shops for health and safety and dangerous goods compliance. The majority still use solvent (xylene or toluene) rather than water based paint systems. Acute solvent exposure can lead to brain damage, some car painters have literally lost their marbles

 

The really dangerous ingredients tend to be in the two pack clears or laquers and the primer fillers or bogs.

The 2 pack clears contain isocyanates which are completely different from cyanide, the principal health risk is occupational asthma. Some of the bogs or primer fillers and lead based pigments (some yellows, blacks and reds) which can cause cancer.

Bake ovens are used with both solvent and water based systems, the purpose of the oven is to speed the drying and harden the paint finish.

 

The insurance companies largely dictate the rates for body repair work forcing out the smaller shops, the few that survive tend to depend on restoration and often tend to be run more as a hobby than a business, with more unfinished projects than the average modeller.

 

The European based manufacturers have been gradually phasing out the most harmful ingredients, but I have had some interesting surprises reading the SDS from some Dutch and German based manufacturers.

Edited by Mayner
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