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DARTtoDingle
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After resurrecting my 25 year old Hornby set for the running around the christmas tree, I've decided to make a more permanent layout. I've decided the space available is too small for OO so I've switched to N gauge.

I've attached a layout plan constructed with Railmodeller Pro. Any ideas and/or comments welcome!

 

My baseboard is 170x110cm, a size restriction necessitated by the need to fit under the bed (and into the car when I bought it).

The general idea is British Rail, circa early 60s so steam and diesel present. My talents and patience do not extend to modifying items to look Irish so until there are RTR Irish trains on the market, BR it is. I like the German stuff too, but the BR stuff is easier to obtain in Ireland.

I intend to use DCC.

 

This is my first effort and I have no experience in carpentry, electronics or general craftwork, so we shall see how it goes. All comments and advice welcome!

 

In case it's not obvious the diagonal track from top left to bottom right will be elevated above the 2 other tracks crossing beneath.

 

Layout 2.jpg

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my only comment , is that in order to implement the elevations you require, in a quite small space as you set out, it will require very steep gradients, which may be beyond model steam locomotives in particular , 1:100 is optimum , 1:75 is acceptable and 1:50 is borderline

 

note that there is now quite a bit of irish outline RTR available,

 

dave

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Thanks for the advice. I did a test with the 2 locos I have (the steam is a Coronation class, the diesel a class 42) , jacked up my test layout to 1:22 and they both easily hauled 6 coaches up the hill. I calculate the gradient in my layout to be 1:23 at the steepest, so hopefully it'll be ok.

 

I didn't realise you can get Irish RTR stuff, where is it for sale?

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Thanks for the advice. I did a test with the 2 locos I have (the steam is a Coronation class, the diesel a class 42) , jacked up my test layout to 1:22 and they both easily hauled 6 coaches up the hill. I calculate the gradient in my layout to be 1:23 at the steepest, so hopefully it'll be ok.

 

I didn't realise you can get Irish RTR stuff, where is it for sale?

 

you have heard of Murphy models etc , or are you all steam era

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Thanks for the advice. I did a test with the 2 locos I have (the steam is a Coronation class, the diesel a class 42) , jacked up my test layout to 1:22 and they both easily hauled 6 coaches up the hill. I calculate the gradient in my layout to be 1:23 at the steepest, so hopefully it'll be ok.

 

I didn't realise you can get Irish RTR stuff, where is it for sale?

 

thats interesting in relation to the gradient, I based my experience not on my own tests, but on feedback from Gordon S of eastwood town fame, he seemed to find RTR models , especially steam locos, struggled with 1;50 . I must go back and have a further chat with him. I am designing a layout with 1;50 ( in the non scenic areas )

 

 

dave

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I think the layout would be more convincing as a mountain railway in a German or continental setting than British outline where the railways tended to take the line of least resistance and loops and spirals to gain height are virtually un-known.

 

German locos and stock tend to be higher quality and are probably a better investment than British Outline. Like OO & HO there is also the little matter that British N Gauge models are made to a larger scale than American and Continental models.

 

While a number of companies produce rtr models in OO no Irish rtr models are currently available.

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Some previous chat about gradients - and an even more previous one referred to in the second post.

 

http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/showthread.php/3739-Gradients?highlight=gradients

 

 

yes that thread is consistent with what I understand that a 2% gradient is about the best you can achieve. its even worse if the gradient curves. The OP seems to be able to deny gravity here, so Im perplexed

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yes that thread is consistent with what I understand that a 2% gradient is about the best you can achieve. its even worse if the gradient curves. The OP seems to be able to deny gravity here, so Im perplexed

 

Several full sized railways including the adhesion worked Cass Scenic Railroad in the USA at 11% or 1:9 appear to have defied gravity.

 

John Armstrongs Track Planning for Realistic Operation recommends 2% for general use and a maximum of 4% where the grade is an operating feature.

 

On the garden railway I operate on a ruling grade of 2% (1:50) over the main line and 3.1% 1:30 on the 18 metre branch to the storage shed.

 

Most of my locos will haul a reasonable train up the 3% the main issue is the risk of damage to stock if a coupling fails and a train runs back from the summit.

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