Jump to content

jhb171achill

Members
  • Content count

    6,323
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    16

Everything posted by jhb171achill

  1. jhb171achill

    OO Works J15

    The first one is holding a rabbit in the air. The second is playing with his super-soaker. The third and fourth are playing the famous old shovel pointing game.
  2. jhb171achill

    murrayec's Projects

    Wow! A thing of great beauty indeed!
  3. jhb171achill

    OO Works J15

    It's soooo tempting to say that they're the "wrong livery", as their overalls should be filthy!!!! 😁
  4. jhb171achill

    Harrys Workbench

    That would never do! (Imagine a J15 in NIR "red bull", or an ICR in lined NCC maroon..................................................................................!!)
  5. jhb171achill

    Hattons nightmare

    Folks and folkesses (if any!) I have been trying several times to order stuff from Hattons online, to no avail. Every time I try to save a list of things I've ticked to buy, a message comes up to say "sorry....blah blah blah....fault reported to webmaster....etc". It doesn't work. I spent some considerable time trying to buy quite a god lot of stuff, yet their website - which at best is interminably slow - just doesn't work. Any thoughts, or alternatives with as large a range as they have? I emailed at one stage - no answer. I doubt if they have a "webmaster" - if so, he's Rip van Winkle as he's been asleep for a long time.
  6. jhb171achill

    Harrys Workbench

    Well, the years have made me bitter and the gargle's dimmed me brain.................!! 😀 🍻
  7. jhb171achill

    Signalling diagrams

    Folks I attach a track plan of a station very vaguely based on some sort of combination of Westport Quay and Valentia Harbour - the basis for my current venture. The idea is to have it signalled for passenger working / ETS. I have an idea of what signals should be where; the loco siding would in this case be just a hand point off the goods road at the top of the diagram, presumably, and there would be a home signal at the platform end for departures. But what of shunting signals? And positioning of point rodding? Thoughts on a €50 note to the usual address......?
  8. jhb171achill

    Signalling diagrams

    Aaaaarrrggghhh! Looks ghastly.......to make! (Or have made!) At least mine's less complicated by far.
  9. jhb171achill

    Signalling diagrams

    I would certainly intend the point rodding to be static, not working!
  10. jhb171achill

    Signalling diagrams

    Interesting, Luke - that appears to make perfect sense. Any other thoughts, anyone?
  11. jhb171achill

    Hattons nightmare

    I'll check that out, Tony, many thanks.
  12. jhb171achill

    Hattons nightmare

    Cheap wagons! A few 5-plank yokes which will be good enough for a repaint and a level of weathering of truly ghastly level! If you search about at rejects an the like, they can be as cheap as £5 each.... Also a few accessories like a road van suitable for repainting as a P & T van of the fifties or sixties. I want two of these to meet mail trains... There are also several wooden-planked British goods vans which are a very good approximation to some GSR goods vans built in the 1940s. Again, I'm looking for as cheap as chips.
  13. jhb171achill

    OO Works J15

    A good accessory for a model J15 is a crew: driver and fireman in overalls, plus a tall figure with a black beret and long brown overcoat - Bob Clements hitching a lift as he often did! Once I get the present layout up and running, various well known characters will appear about the place in the form of little figures.....
  14. jhb171achill

    Patricks Layout

    Well, it's the season after all.......!
  15. jhb171achill

    Patricks Layout

    Looks as close as anything to many standard styles, particulary GSWR. In this guise, it fits perfectly into its surroundings. Maybe Glenmore is an ex-DSER location, or maybe it's ex GSWR, like Rosslare - Waterford, Palace East - Bagenalstown, or somewhere between Waterford and either Mallow or Gowal Limni!
  16. jhb171achill

    OO Works J15

    A single one (193 from memory?) was repainted all-grey about 1961/2, only months before withdrawal. Uniquely, it had a black smokebox and chimney, but was otherwise "sheep-dipped" grey. None were lined in any way, ever, but many had black edging around the crimson buffer beam. No other black at any stage.
  17. jhb171achill

    Examples of GSWR / GSR / CIE paint for locomotives

    He also made two stationary steam engines, and started on a locomotive (only boiler & cylinders); the standard of workmanship on the latter was exceptional, and he parts moved very smoothly. He was an excellent wood-caver and turner too. He built a model also of a GSWR convertible ("soft-top") goods van, to a scale of about an inch and a quarter to the foot. It remains in actual GSWR paint. Apart from the above model (which he made as a toy for my father about 1920-ish), I don't have any of the other stuff, which a relative has. So at least it survives! It would be my hope that some day it can all be displayed alongside Maedb in Cultra.
  18. Good evening all I have had a lengthy phone call tonight with Roderick of the excellent 00 Works, who as most will know is planning a launch of a RTR J15. After several previous conversations over the livery, I took some more photos of my grandfather's model, ninety years old at the moment. This was a coarse-scale 00 gauge model, but the photos are to show the grey paint which is original. Before photographing it in daylight, I took the precaution of checking that the paint hadn't faded or become discoloured as old paint can. The test proved positive, as they say, by filing away gently at a small section on the tender. So - this is what the GSWR replaced their lined black with, starting around 1915-8, and which the GSR and CIE continued with unaltered until the end of steam. I'm posting this for general interest as well as for Roderick's information - I can confirm that he has gone the IRM-style extraordinary lengths to ensure accuracy in all areas, a difficult thing with a long-lived cl;ass with so many examples - so these locos will be eagerly awaited. I'm sure I don't need to add that like any new model, it will come as it would have looked "out of the paint shop"; buyers can weather down - as the prototype would have had - to whatever extent preferred. The grey was known to darken in time, usually as a result of a combination of rare cleaning, big intervals between repaints, dirt and oily rags used for cleaning. Exact matching with colour card size will follow. It is - rightly - OO Works' intention to get this historically important (if dull!) livery properly right. The pictures follow earlier postings of mine, of the same engine in different light, including artificial.
  19. jhb171achill

    Harrys Workbench

    I'm not sure where I got that from, harry - it was probably a joke! 😏
  20. jhb171achill

    GSR / CIE Wagon Liveries

    For those who have asked, I now have details re the above which I hope may be of help to all. The GSR used a grey for all wagons which was described as being the same as LMS wagon grey - which can be bought readily (is Humbrol still on the go?). Wagons were painted grey all over, with the only bits picked out in black being buffers and couplings. The large "G S" and numerals on the sides were a light cream colour, though this tended to darken a bit after a while in use. Wagon roofs and chassis were in the body colour, not black - a very common error on models because bought model wagons are inevitably of BR & constituent companies across the water, where black chassis sem to have been the norm - unless, that is, Hornby perpetuated an error years ago! I suppose this is why, to me, livery information is crucial. Some might see it as the stuff of bean counters or rivet counters, and if one's main interest in a layout is the operational side, so be it - no one type of interest is more or less valid than another. But the first thing anyone ever knows about anything in the world is what it LOOKS like - and livery plays 50% of this part, outline dimensions being the other 50%. Hence my interest in liveries! I was taking an interest in the world outside when CIE's green and snails were giving way to broken wheels, red and cream buses, navy and cream buses, black and silver lorries and black'n'tan trains, and the UTA's green buses were becoming blue and cream Ulsterbuses, while their trains were also changing livery. UTA green, GNR brown carriages, UTA blue and cream and early NIR maroon and grey were all floating about in my head, instead of French vocabulary, equations, and chemical formulae.. Once CIE took over, variations started to appear. Photos taken in the 50s show flying snails adorning what was still clearly this mid-grey as opposed to the much lighter shade used from the mid 60s onwards). The familiar "broken wheel" started to appear from 1963, but wagons were still to be seen with "snails" as late as 1978 - when I photographed one in a train at Ballina. At some stage about 1959 / 60, the lighter grey (similar to that on 121 class locos at first) began to appear, mostly if not entirely on newly built standard "H" vans. I never saw an older wooden framed wagon in light grey. In the mid 60s, fitted wagons were painted brown - a theme copied, I believe, from British Rail, but it doesn't seem to have been absolute as I occasionally saw a brown wagon which was not fitted - perhaps some wagons received or had removed the relevant pipes, but were not repainted. Older wagons tended to retain the darker grey. The corrugated-sided Bullied open wagons had all but replaced wooden bodied opens by the early 70s, but I do recall seeing a single one of these wooden wagons in brown, but it was not fitted - that was unusual, as these wagons were inevitably the slightly darker grey of pre 1960. The corrugated-sided ones went on to carry little other than beet in later years. They were always a silvery grey which could have been as a result of having been unpainted, or possibly they were galvanized. The chassis of these occasionally had brown daubs of paint with the number painted on, or maintenance dates - just like other wagons. By the mid 1970s, most goods trains were made up of "H" vans which I would guess were about 60% brown, 40% light grey. Every rule has exceptions. In steam days the railways were a much dirtier environment, and paint was more expensive than now, so lowly goods wagons tended not to receive the cosmetic care and attention lavished (usually) on locos and passenger stock. Thus, wagons could frequently appear with just a few newly replaced planks repainted in new paint, with the rest not repainted - maybe a wagon with newly painted doors, but not the rest. In later days unpainted planks would sometimes appear 9more so on the UTA in the 60s, though). The dirt, brake dust, coal smoke and soot mean that wagons were in, well, fifty shades of grey!! Special vehicles are well known and gave been commented on here by others - blue Tara waons, white and dark green Anhydrous Ammonia bogie tankers, and silver and red Asahi wagons. The most common exceptions, perhaps, for many modellers would be the cement "bubbles". These started life in the standard CIE grey, with black lettering and tan-coloured "wheel" surround to the black "CIE" lettering on the logo. From the early 70s they were repainted orange, with grey or black chassis and black lettering. The "bubbles" tended to be regularly cleaned in these times, not covered in a layer of cement as in later days. The next stage was a cream colour with "Irish Cement" logo, which they technically ended their days in, though they were so dirty it was impossible to tell what colour many were painted; they were just coated in cement dust. Narrow gauge vehicles (West Clare, T & D, C & L) were all painted the older darker grey, though with even less frequent visits to paint chops, the fifty shades were more like 150 shades. Modellers of this type of thing could really get away with anything - the one common denominator being very heavy brake dust and paint-faded weathering! Sometimes wagons were intended for use on passenger trains, and would be painted in a matching livery. A handful of "H" vans (maybe only 1 or 2 for some special reason?) were standard dark passenger green, but with wagon-style "snail" markings and the usual stencilled numerals in white. I have seen but two pictures of these - one had the green down to the chassis, and a black chassis like a passenger vehicle, but green ironwork on the body. The other looks as if the whole chassis was green. The West Clare section had four small 4-wheeled vans for use on passenger trains - these had a green body and black chassis. Elsewhere, wagons in grey era, including the 1960s lighter version, and the brown seen everywhere since, never had black chassis or ironwork - this is a common error in models due to whatg appears to be the standard use of black chassis on BR-based models, which most of us start with! The only exceptions to that anywhere in Ireland that I am aware of, are NCC brown vans in certain liveries (can't speak for original state) and some one-offs or oddball PW vehicles. Talking of PW stock, all companies used standard grey or black for spray train equipment, breakdown trains and what are now known as maintenance-of-way stuff. Imported tamping and lining machines were yellow from the start, a that's how they were made by the likes of Plasser & Theurer, but it is only in recent years that ballast vans and sundry wagons, spray train carriages, etc, have become yellow. A spray train modelled pre-1980 anyway would be grey. I seem to recall the ex-GNR breakdown crane in red, though this was almost certainly a UTA job. The GNR, like CIE and the GSR, would have painted them grey all over. All this grey - sounds dull, doesn't it? But look at old colour photos; dull in colour terms, but if I may suggest, a lot more interesting than today. Going back into history, the MGWR painted wagons grey, as did the GNR, but the GSWR painted them black at one stage, and as I think I might have mentioned somewhere else, a very dark grey which I can verify off a large scale model I have which was made in Inchicore about 1905. The BCDR and NCC were early entrants into the world of grey for loose coupled, bauxite brown for fitted. Finally, as befits the last wagon on every goods train, is the humble guard's van. These followed the practice of other wagons on whatever railway they were on - i.e. inevitably all over grey. CIE started painting the guard's ducket with black and yellow stripes from the mid 60s, and once a van was repainted brown (as all survivors were by mid 70s-ish), it retained the yellow and black striping. Regrettably, the three best preserved guard's vans are inaccurate livery-wise; the CIE one in the UFTM at Cultra has black and white stripes on the ducket, and incorrect style of numerals, and the (EXCELLENTLY restored) GNR van at Whitehead has cream inside the balconies 9should be grey), black ironwork* and black lower body. (* Re. exceptions to rules: NIR painted ironwork black on one or two guard's vans and ballast opens in the 70s!). The third van, the former NCC one at Downpatrick, is in NIR light grey like this, but with UTA markings. I should add that in terms of liveries, the colour scheme of the CIE van at Cultra is by noe means the only livery inaccuracy there. It's best to check elsewhere if modelling something in there! Though, as one of their own folk very correctly said one time, it's better to have something painted bright pink and tartan, than not have it at all! I'd better go and do my shopping now......
  21. jhb171achill

    barrow street

    This is outstanding work, set in an area I know very well....
  22. jhb171achill

    GSWR 6w Bk3rd from a SSM kit

    Superb work. Question - as I have some of these on order - what radius will it comfortably go round?
  23. jhb171achill

    Query re GSR Drewry railcars

    Very nice work. I am not sure of exact chassis detail, but I have a vague idea that there's a decent shot of one in the National Photographic Archive collection of the late Jimmy O'Dea. That's maybe the photo reproduced above.....! Livery wise - GSR later (LMS shade) maroon, though some have said that at least one might have been varnished wood. I cannot confirm or deny that. CIE painted them the standard dark green, complete with (rather large, for the size of them) "eau-de-nil" lines and snail. None ever got the lighter green. I am afraid I can't provide any info on the interior colours either, though it is probable that they had darkish red upholstery if any, and light brown-painted interiors. I will delve into the Catacombs here to see if I can dig up anything else.
  24. jhb171achill

    Query re GSR Drewry railcars

    Anyone know where there are drawings or decent photos of the 5ft 3 versions? (Not the West Clare one).
  25. jhb171achill

    071 fleet overhaul updates.

    Interesting to speculate what exactly all eighteen of these beasts will do with the DFDS cancelled. How many are in traffic on a daily basis to cope with what few containers are left, the sticks and the Tara? On that note, how many 201s does it take, on a daily basis, to look after the Enterprise and the Mk 4s?
×

Important Information

Terms of Use