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Tail lamps on Irish Trains

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Robert Davies
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Tail lamps on Irish trains - A question or two, or more.

 

In recent times, since the early nineties, I have been observing two tail lamps posted on the rear of Irish trains. What are the rules regarding these tail lamps? Are they lit? Are they both lit? Do they flash, or are they a steady illumination?

 

In early periods of time I have observed in the usual fashion - on various photo sites and on youtube - that only one tail lamp was posted on the rear of the train - when did this change to the norm being a twin red light?

 

I sincerely apologise for the newbie questions, but the google is weak within me today, and no real answers could I divine from the great oracle.

 

Thanks and regards,

 

-Rob

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In recent times, since the early nineties, I have been observing two tail lamps posted on the rear of Irish trains. What are the rules regarding these tail lamps? Are they lit? Are they both lit? Do they flash, or are they a steady illumination?

 

Two non-flashing lamps is what I've observed in recent years.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnsA0Mv4idQ, etc.

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Afternoon Robert,

After the inquiry into the Cherryville Jctn accident, which recommended the introduction of a high intensity tail lamp to be on the rear of all trains,

Irish rail decided to introduce two tail lamps for all trains during 1990-1991,

The first type were of a French design and were yellow in colour,they were activated by being placed on the lamp iron-but could be switched off with a carriage key where necessary,

The second type were white in colour and were identical to some BR ones that were being used at that time in the UK-(some of the irish ones even having the BR double arrow on them)

They could be switched on or off with a black switch to the right hand side of the red light,

When the battery ran out a little red indicator went out and the lamp had to be sent back to Inchicore for replacement,

These lamps lasted most of the late 1990s until about 2002 when a new lightweight type of lamp was introduced which had LEDs as the red light and are very effective-they are switched on/off by turning a switch at the back of the lamp-and an LED indicator light is located in the side and when this goes out the batteries can be replaced,

Both white types of lamps can still be seen nowadays on liner/Perway trains-but it's the LED type lamp that is the preferred type.

As regards the rule on the use of the lamps,if one or both failed en route then the train could continue to the next station where there was a stock of spare lamps available.

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des, for the cabbages amongst us, is wireing instructions included?

 

Shem,

 

Yup, I have written up instructions, with a diagram. The wording is as follows:

 

Assembly

1. Drill out the lamp as appropriate. For old style-drill base and front to meet, for modern-just widen the back hole.

2. Old style-insert LED and glue in place. Modern-thread LED wires & glue flat in the hollow section

3. Handle carefully as the wiring connection is very delicate

4. Old style-bend and cut 0.3mm PB wire to shape and superglue as lamp handle

5. Paint the lamp white/black/red/silver using acrylic paint

6. For a red light lamp, use a pin to pick up the 2mm diameter red filter circle. Place gently on a dot of superglue

7. Connect the longer LED wire to the resistor and connected to the positive. See diagram above.

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Rob, I'd say ttc has that right. They were introduced after a rear-end crash. I don't remember which, but I'd say Cherryville is right. Up to then all lamps were oil. After that the battery powered ones came in. IR always used 2, and I heard somewhere that it was in case 1 failed, which never seems to have been a problem (or a consideration) with the oil ones. I had thought that they were activated automatically, with a switch dependent on the ambient light - by day, the signalman had to check for the white body, by night for the red light. That's for what it's worth: I'd say ttc knows more than I do.

 

Alan

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