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NIR Rolling Stock

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Kirley
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One of my favourite reference books is, "35 Years of NIR" by Jonathan Allen.

In the Appendix: Rolling Stock, it lists all from 1967 to 2002. The last Sub-Heading in this Appendix is , "OCV Stock introduced 1972-74" and lists:

 

1. Four-wheel flat wagons (converted from NCC Parcel Vans) and used to carry cross-channel Red Star parcel containers from Larne Port to Belfast.

 

2. Bogie flat wagons (converted from NCC passenger coaches) and also and used to carry cross-channel Red Star parcel containers from Larne Port to Belfast.

 

My questions are,

What does OCV stand for?

Besides PW wagons did NIR use any other wagons (leaving aside the CIE/IR cross border Freight Traffic)?

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That ex-UTA bogie van is a former GNR "P" van, for express parcels and generally stuck on the back of passenger trains. NIR inherited at least two, but they were little used NIR days.

 

At least one was painted all over maroon by NIR, with a logo and standard style yellow numerals. One is now at Whitehead.

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Thanks Richie, you are the first person to put forward an answer to OCV, I was thinking of something Container Vehicle but I never came across the term elsewhere.

 

John, I have seen pictures of the old Spoil Wagons in Lisburn on PW duties and besides the Parcel Van converted from MED Trailer I can't think any others except maybe a brown van stuck onto a MPD or 70 Class Railcar. In Jonathan Allen's book he has a picture of a DH shunting UTA open wagons in 1970, I wonder what they were used for? Also I have some memory of coal being used at Courtauld's Factory at Carrickfergus, how did it get there, did Courtaults have it's own line and Engine?

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Courtaulds had its own siding - almost a branch line. They had three steam locos of their own at one time but they used NCC (later UTA) wagons kept specially for the purpose. For the record, these were mostly what ended up as NIR ballast wagons, with many having had their sons cut down later. Derelict examples exist at Whitehead and Downpatrick. They were painted a bauxite brown all over, metal included, but were lettered for the UTA in standard style when I knew them.

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John, I have seen pictures of the old Spoil Wagons in Lisburn on PW duties and besides the Parcel Van converted from MED Trailer I can't think any others except maybe a brown van stuck onto a MPD or 70 Class Railcar. In Jonathan Allen's book he has a picture of a DH shunting UTA open wagons in 1970, I wonder what they were used for? Also I have some memory of coal being used at Courtauld's Factory at Carrickfergus, how did it get there, did Courtaults have it's own line and Engine?

 

Kieran-there are a couple of picture references to the siding at the Courtauld's factory.In Rails around Belfast,there is a photo of one of the two 0-4-0 saddle tank engines with one of the open wagons behind it.These engines were named Wilfred and Patricia and were eventually scrapped after the closure of the factory.In the Ulster Transport Authority in colour book,Jeep No4 can be seen at the head of a long coal train destined for Courtauld's.Most of the wagons are the ones the DH was shunting,these were all refurbished for the contract.There are a couple of grey opens at the front of the train,probably ex BCDR wagon.

 

With regards freight on NIR,as the UTA had decided to abandon all freight within Northern Ireland in favour of road transport,in fact as they tried to abandon the railway full stop,there was not much freight left when NIR came into existence.As John has pointed out,the Courtauld wagons were used for ballast and sometimes sleepers along with some of the older grey open wagons.I remember the DH doing this work on the GNR section,I have a photo somewhere of it with 3 grey wagons that had their sides cut down to 2 planks.Some of the spoil wagons were also used for ballast.These were converted by welding the side entry doors and changing them to a normal hopper operation.I have no idea how many of these wagons NIR converted.

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I suspect it was only a very few, Hunslet, as such conversions were deemed unsatisfactory due to the inherent instability of those wagons. They were only ever intended as a stop gap measure anyway.

 

Agreed John,although some of them remained in service a very long time after the spoil contract finished.I would doubt NIR would have converted more than about a dozen given the size of the system and the money constraints that they worked under

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Correct, Hunslet. The most I ever saw together after the spoil contract was 2 or 3 max.

 

John-when they were relaying the old Central line in preparation for trains running to Central,a DH with around 6 spoil wagons was commonly in use.My aunt stayed in Utility Street and I used to watch the action from there when visiting.All other times I would agree with 2 or 3 max as that was what I remember on the GNR section when new ballast was getting put down.

 

One other interesting point,there was another spoil contract in 1974 that lasted about a year that had Hunslet haulage with around 10 spoil wagons in use.These wagons had NIR on the sides,same position as the UT on the original wagons.Here's my thought though,were these some of the original spoil wagons that were not converted for PW work and just tarted up by NIR for the contract?My guess is that they were,but if you have a definitive answer....

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I'm not sure, Hunslet, I wasn't aware of that. I suspect they were leftovers which had not been altered, providing spoil transport rather than ballast was the main use.

 

Had they been repainted, and if so, what colour? Hardly the light duck-egg blue? NIR tended to paint things light grey at that time. Did they have an NIR logo, or lettering for NIR, and if so in what colour?

 

Must add that one to my ongoing livery database!

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Oh yes, I remember that now. The wagons had standard NIR maroon painted over the original number, and a strip along where "U T" had been. New NIR lettering was put on them in white. Other than that, the wagons were not repainted at all, and the original "duck-egg blue" is still to be seen under a layer of filth, rust, brake dust and ballast dust.

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Kieran-yes,the Merlinir containers were owned by NIR,used in the same way as the Bell and B & I containers,not sure how successful they were or how many of them existed,but they were scarce on the ground.Probably NIRs attempt to get a foothold in the marketplace with a busy freight period at the time and the great facilities they had at Adelaide.

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Continuing my hunt for all NIR Rolling Stock came across these rail wagons.

 

Railbogiewagons2.jpg

 

Has anyone any information on them, are they converted coach under frames, or bought it by NIR, how many do they have?

 

Hopefully someone can provide the answers.

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Continuing my hunt for all NIR Rolling Stock came across these rail wagons.

 

Railbogiewagons2.jpg

 

Has anyone any information on them, are they converted coach under frames, or bought it by NIR, how many do they have?

 

Hopefully someone can provide the answers.

 

I dunno what their official designation is, but they have been around for a while.

 

York Road 1991, & Bridge End, c.1992:

 

York Road 1-3.jpg

 

NIR GM 113 Bridge End 001.jpg

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I have some info on them upstairs which i'll get in the morn. They're 60' wagons with traversing cranes. The cranes have a lawnmower type motor on them and the hooks grab rail and it's slung onto the ballast shoulder of the track. This is then formed up to make the 10' gauge temporary donelli track. The top deck is much higher than other flats and i think there are only two of them. r.

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I have some info on them upstairs which i'll get in the morn. They're 60' wagons with traversing cranes. The cranes have a lawnmower type motor on them and the hooks grab rail and it's slung onto the ballast shoulder of the track. This is then formed up to make the 10' gauge temporary donelli track. The top deck is much higher than other flats and i think there are only two of them. r.

 

I thought you could not resist PW stock Richie, I had to look up what Donelli track was. I'm interested to know if they were bought in by NIR or were they adapted from old carriage stock.

 

Thanks for your imputes 33lima & Nelson.

 

Railbogiewagons.jpg

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