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Mark IIs in Galway Livery

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Does anyone have some decent colour photos of the Mark IIs in their Galway livery that they could share? I am particularly interested in the restaurant and EGVs (I don't think a first class was done?).

 

Hi send me your email in a pm and I will send you some pics. The coaches that were repainted were.

EGV 5601

Restaaurant Buffet Standard 5411

Standards 5209-5213-5216-5225-5232-5233-5235.

 

Rich,

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Hi send me your email in a pm and I will send you some pics. The coaches that were repainted were.

EGV 5601

Restaaurant Buffet Standard 5411

Standards 5209-5213-5216-5225-5232-5233-5235.

 

Rich,

 

If you don't mind Rich, could you do the same for me? ;) I can't find many pics

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Any way they could be posted for all members?

 

Stephen when I had my accident a lot of my researching of rolling stock, infrastructure, permanent way and other railway associated photographing was diminished. I knew some lads that I used to meet out and about on the network and they were good enough to take photos for me. They wouldn't mind me passing some photos on to other enthusiasts for similar purposes as my own, but some of the lads asked me not to post them on sites like ours or send them to magazines.

 

I have such a large collection of photos on my pc that it's hard to remember which ones I took and which ones were given to me. I wouldn't want to put the group in jeopardy by posting pics that I can't be 100% sure I took. I always took pics that most people don't bother to take, examples being,

Loco, coach roofs

Underframe equipment on coaches, wagons, locos

Electrical gear, fuel tanks, headstocks, draw hooks, drop head buckeye couplers, instanter - screw couplings, pipes and hoses

A lot of people forget in the present that what we have now will be history some day so I would urge people to get out there and photograph everything no matter how mundane or uninteresting it might appear to be. As when they are gone they are gone. I went up to Clonmel on the train a month ago to photograph and take some measurements of the road bridge at the Tipp end of the station as it is being replaced and demolished. How many people take photos of the ornate metalwork at stations or the old footbridges. Arroll Brothers Foundry in Scotland built the footbridge in Clonmel Station in the 1800's and the builders plate is still on the bridge, how many people would model that or even be interested in it, and yet it is an important piece of railway infrastructure and it's also historical. Compiling photographs drawing scale elevations of buildings, photographing the track, seeing what kind of chairs are holding the rail, where the keys are in the chairs, how many bolts are in the chairs, what way they are facing is as, if not more important than building and constructing the models. How can you build a scale model if you don't know what it looks like. The model of Connolly shed that Richie built for you Stephen could not have been built if he hadn't photographed it or studied it, and the reason the model looks so amazing is because Richie did his research.

 

I am willing to and have already emailed lot's of pics to those who pm'd me and if anyone wants them please as has already been stated pm me your email address and I will sort you out.

 

When I get some time to sift through my collection Stephen I will post pics in the prototype rolling stock area and I hope that they will be of some use to the members of the group.

 

Rich,

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A lot of people forget in the present that what we have now will be history some day so I would urge people to get out there and photograph everything no matter how mundane or uninteresting it might appear to be. As when they are gone they are gone. ..... Compiling photographs drawing scale elevations of buildings, photographing the track, seeing what kind of chairs are holding the rail, where the keys are in the chairs, how many bolts are in the chairs, what way they are facing is as, if not more important than building and constructing the models. How can you build a scale model if you don't know what it looks like.

 

Richie, have to completely agree with you on this. At the risk of sounding like John Waters, today is the future's past. We take so much for granted and then it changes and is gone. 60 years ago people bemoaned the homogeneity of the A and C classes and yet now will travel across the country now to hear one in Downpatrick! You have to almost step outside yourself to look at everyday scenes in a fresh light and see what needs to be recorded.

 

Examples? Photograph passengers waiting in the concourse. Clothes colours, haircuts, styles, the types of cars parked outside or on the road, advertising hoardings. Upholstry on buses and coaches, the floor coverings. Give it 10 years and everything will have changed. Telephone boxes will soon be a think of the past.

 

If I was to advise on one thing? Victorian and edwardian railway architecture. Cut stone bridges, cast iron furniture, downpipes, guttering, canopy supports. 150 years ago they were not only designed to last but had an asthetic to them, they were meant to look well and in harmony with the rest of the infrastructure. Particularly focus on the older or closed lines as they are being removed, rusting away or being swallowed up by overgrowth.

 

Given taking a photograph has zero cost compared to the equivalent of €20-30 for 36 shots 30 years ago, get shooting, and now.

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Richie, have to completely agree with you on this. At the risk of sounding like John Waters, today is the future's past. We take so much for granted and then it changes and is gone. 60 years ago people bemoaned the homogeneity of the A and C classes and yet now will travel across the country now to hear one in Downpatrick! You have to almost step outside yourself to look at everyday scenes in a fresh light and see what needs to be recorded.

 

Examples? Photograph passengers waiting in the concourse. Clothes colours, haircuts, styles, the types of cars parked outside or on the road, advertising hoardings. Upholstry on buses and coaches, the floor coverings. Give it 10 years and everything will have changed. Telephone boxes will soon be a think of the past.

 

If I was to advise on one thing? Victorian and edwardian railway architecture. Cut stone bridges, cast iron furniture, downpipes, guttering, canopy supports. 150 years ago they were not only designed to last but had an asthetic to them, they were meant to look well and in harmony with the rest of the infrastructure. Particularly focus on the older or closed lines as they are being removed, rusting away or being swallowed up by overgrowth.

 

Given taking a photograph has zero cost compared to the equivalent of €20-30 for 36 shots 30 years ago, get shooting, and now.

 

Des the reason you produce the excellent kit's that you produce is because you research everything. The SSM LC kit that Eamonn superbly built has some amazing detail on it, Eamonn commented himself on how uniquely Irish it looked compared to the BR Style gates in his pic, and why it looked unique to Ireland is because you photographed the prototype, measured it, and only went ahead with the artwork when you were satisfied that it was right.

 

Eamonn's build of the 30 Ton Brake Van and ground signal look so good because he has improved and honed his skills, and the design Quality of the kit's is superb. George and Gareth (Hidden Agenda) have also built fantastic models of the Brake Van.

 

I think it would be fair to say that if Modelling Irish Railways by Stephen Johnson and Alan O' Rourke was to be updated and reprinted it would have to be maybe 20or 30 pages longer than the first edition was to contain everything that SSM, Murphy Models, and the excellent models that Dave and Mark have brought to the market so far The 2600 is a masterpiece and the DE Dietrich DVT and Coaches are going to be amazing, can you imagine the amount of work that has gone into those models. The retailers have brought some cracking models to the market also. Marks Models commissioned 171 in IE livery a few years ago and the Autoballasters are amazing. Silver Fox and DC Kits have produced some nice prototype models as well for the Irish market. Des your own detail kit for the Silver Fox Metro Vick's really take's them to a whole different level.

 

Lads do the research, ask questions, photograph everything and share the information because everybody benefits from it.

 

Rich,

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Rich,

 

Thanks for the kind words, they are very much appreciated, and it makes the research all worth while. In terms of design, it's a case of keep it simple, no kit should at heart be tricker than a 72nd scale Airfix Spitfire kit, and given CAD easily enables tolerances of 0.1mm, they should fit together easily as well.

 

Must be said, I would happily pay for a new edition of Modelling Irish Railways. Between his website and the book, Steve has been a huge influence from the get-go. Indeed, the signalling section was one of the inspirations to starting the range of signal kits. It's hard to believe the first edition is only eight years old, given the quantum change in what is available in the irish modelling sphere. And there is plenty left to come out yet!

 

 

Must get me one of those 2600s .......

 

Regards

Des

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Rich,

 

Thanks for the kind words, they are very much appreciated, and it makes the research all worth while. In terms of design, it's a case of keep it simple, no kit should at heart be tricker than a 72nd scale Airfix Spitfire kit, and given CAD easily enables tolerances of 0.1mm, they should fit together easily as well.

 

Must be said, I would happily pay for a new edition of Modelling Irish Railways. Between his website and the book, Steve has been a huge influence from the get-go. Indeed, the signalling section was one of the inspirations to starting the range of signal kits. It's hard to believe the first edition is only eight years old, given the quantum change in what is available in the irish modelling sphere. And there is plenty left to come out yet!

 

 

Must get me one of those 2600s .......

 

Regards

Des

 

Des we can sometimes in a business sense be on opposite sides of the fence as consumers, and companies who produce the goods. I find that not to be the case in Irish Railway modelling terms as all you guys are modellers as well. Paddy Murphy is a dynamo and his enthusiasm for the hobby and satisfying his clientèle never ceases to amaze me.

 

Rich,

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Thanks for the kind words Rich, and let me back up your sentiment by using an oft misqouted phrase - "God is in the Detail". The more detail that is picked up, photographed, sketched, measured and recorded, the better the end product - whatever the subject or media.

 

In terms of photographs, I make it a rule to photograph as much inane things as possible - Reelcraft hoses, point rodding, signage, platform paving types, and sod those who give me funny looks. I go back to photos I took in the p1ss1n rain in loveless junction 2003, and get weepy at the loss of so much freight, locos, and track layouts in such little time.

 

Photos shared or not, this forum allows us to put out the request, and if the answer comes by pm, email or carrier pigeon, it improves the collective knowledge pot. This facility - IRM, is a monumental leap from the days of a couple of raggedy books on pre-grouping BR stuff in the county library after all!

 

Incidentally, CIE are going to demolish Connolly Shed in the interest of progress. Philistines.PIMP

 

Richie.

 

[P.s I snap ornate bits too!]

cropped.jpg

cropped.jpg

Edited by Glenderg
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Another thing as well lads is if you have any elderly relatives or neighbors talk to them ask them what they remember of the railways in bygone years. I remember talking to my Gran uncle many years ago about traveling by rail. He described the coaches, the way they were furnished and laid out, the smell of steam heated coaches. I said to him why haven't you ever told me this before, he said you never asked me. Jack O'Neill is a railway historian living in Waterford and his brain holds more information than a computer.

 

I remember attending an IRRS tour of Inchicore years ago and railway historian and modeller Donal Murray was doing the tour with his dad. His dad had worked there and the stories he told us were priceless. We were seeing the works in it's current state and getting a history lesson at the same time. I'll never forget it. It's criminal Richie that CIE are going to pull down that shed it's one of the highlights for me to see the building whenever I am travelling north out of Connolly. I will have to etch it into my memory the next time that I pass it.

 

Rich,

 

Rich,

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Thanks for the kind words Rich, and let me back up your sentiment by using an oft misqouted phrase - "God is in the Detail". The more detail that is picked up, photographed, sketched, measured and recorded, the better the end product - whatever the subject or media.

 

In terms of photographs, I make it a rule to photograph as much inane things as possible - Reelcraft hoses, point rodding, signage, platform paving types, and sod those who give me funny looks. I go back to photos I took in the p1ss1n rain in loveless junction 2003, and get weepy at the loss of so much freight, locos, and track layouts in such little time.

 

Photos shared or not, this forum allows us to put out the request, and if the answer comes by pm, email or carrier pigeon, it improves the collective knowledge pot. This facility - IRM, is a monumental leap from the days of a couple of raggedy books on pre-grouping BR stuff in the county library after all!

 

Incidentally, CIE are going to demolish Connolly Shed in the interest of progress. Philistines.PIMP

 

Richie.

 

[P.s I snap ornate bits too!]

[ATTACH=CONFIG]1373[/ATTACH]

 

Richie your a man after my own heart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rich,

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DSC00753.jpg

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they might not replace it at all, the only purpose it appears to have now is to shield locos from the rain,partially, also increasing maintenance costs (though it's was always in bits as long as i can remember)

Anyway it will be one more bit of lovely piece of railway architecture gone:((

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Thanks Rich! [lovin' the English Garden Bond on the signal box bricks!]

 

Vince, it's worse than that. They are going to turn the car park at the rear of Connolly and the old baggage hall into an inner city tower block complex, and essentially build over the DMU sidings which will involve knocking the Maintenance Shed and the Motive Power Shed. The scheme was dreamt up in the boom times, and only recently got the go ahead, so whether it happens or not is a mystery. What's more upsetting is that An Taisce, the national heritage body, who made a submission on the scheme said nothing about conservation, railway history, or the butchering of the last remnants of the iconic complex that is Connolly. Incidentally has anyone seen any activity in the shed recently? Shutters always appear to be down?

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Connolly shed closed on 31 December 2010. The area in front of the shed is only used to stable locomotives, all servicing work is undertaken in Inchicore Works now. The version of the redevelopment story I heard was that the shed was to be completely refurbished to accommodate a relocated and upgraded CTC centre. The original CTC building is now considered too small given the massive expansion of the system and it was that building that would have been demolished as part of the proposed redevelopment plan.

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Connolly shed closed on 31 December 2010. The area in front of the shed is only used to stable locomotives, all servicing work is undertaken in Inchicore Works now. The version of the redevelopment story I heard was that the shed was to be completely refurbished to accommodate a relocated and upgraded CTC centre. The original CTC building is now considered too small given the massive expansion of the system and it was that building that would have been demolished as part of the proposed redevelopment plan.

 

Correct.

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