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Irish Rail Spoil Wagons

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Kirley
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I’m looking for information on these modern Spoil Wagons. It seems they were built on Flat double bogie wagons by Irish Rail?, but I’ve no idea what their dimensions. Are they just used for haulage of spoil and how are they emptied?

 

Redsppsh96 posted a video on YouTube of 074 pulling a rake on them in July past.

 

 

I know IFM do models of them but I was wondering if there are any British RTR models that come close?

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Thanks for the link to Heirflick's entry in 2012. I see some have hoods fitted at each end of the 42' spoil wagons while others have hoods between the two boxes on each wagon.

 

Rich you mention there are two different builds, can you elaborate please?

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Not sure there were two different builds Rich, but it would appear there were additions made to the original 50. Open to correction, of course.

 

Old Style - August 2012

 

Old Style.jpg

 

New Style - Added hoods at the rear to avoid clogging up at the ends, a central clamp between two containers that stops them moving, and additional bracing from the lower quarters upward. I reckon this is to support the angles inside the wagon when the jcb or whatever scrapes out the contents.

 

May 2014

 

New Style.jpg

 

Richie.

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There are some close ups of the wagons in this video if it helps. It also shows how they are unloaded which is just by using a roadrailer to scoop the stuff out of the containers.

 

You could contact the company that made them for dimensions and then convert them to 1/76 scale. Here's the company that made them.

http://www.loughryaneng.com/website/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=68&Itemid=72

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Thanks for the link to Heirflick's entry in 2012. I see some have hoods fitted at each end of the 42' spoil wagons while others have hoods between the two boxes on each wagon.

 

Rich you mention there are two different builds, can you elaborate please?

 

The pics Richie has posted show the two different types Kieran. In pic one the body sides are flat between the ribs on the side and ends. In the second pic you can see a slant below the numbers to the ends.. I would say the hoods were indeed added after some trial and error due to spoil falling between the boxes and headstocks. Imagine a rake of 12 flats from SSM with spoil boxes behind a Silver Black 071 on the layout Kieran, empty or full. Now that would be sweet. Richie scratch built some excellent boxes and are in his workbench thread.

 

Rich,

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Superb video, the quality is wicked.

 

I posted the drawings of them in their previous form sometime ago (2 years?) :confused: Anyway, when I get a chance to update them, perhaps over the weekend I'll get them and a few photos into the resource section.

 

Good man Richie, I was about to ask.

 

Rich,

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There are some close ups of the wagons in this video if it helps. It also shows how they are unloaded which is just by using a roadrailer to scoop the stuff out of the containers.

 

You could contact the company that made them for dimensions and then convert them to 1/76 scale. Here's the company that made them.

http://www.loughryaneng.com/website/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=68&Itemid=72

 

Clonmel getting the track pimped. They certainly have done some great work on the buildings also, fitting new windows where a lot of them were boarded up. They have really tidied up the front of the one story building also. I can't say that I like the new road bridge at the Cahir side of the station. A lot less charming then the old one. I would also recommend the rest of the vids on youtube in that collection. Put on the Kettle and relax for a few hours watching them.

 

Rich,

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Thanks Rich for pointing out the difference in the wagons. Also I agree the strengthen bridge has not the same character as the original and that's why I modelled the old one on my layout.

 

You made the right choice with the bridge Kieran. I regularly have a look on your layout pages, especially the station. I love Clonmel Station myself. It's a beautiful building and your model of the buildings really captures that look. With the space available to you, you have done an amazing job.

 

I wonder were the wagons built like that, or were the changes done by IE.

 

Rich,

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On 8/10/2014 at 5:58 PM, Glenderg said:

I reckon this is to support the angles inside the wagon when the jcb or whatever scrapes out the contents.

Is that how spoil wagons were unloaded (empties), manually by bucket from a digger or front loader? Did they ever have some sort of tipping mechanism for quick unloading? If the former I assume there was some manual work with shovels to full empty them. Could not find any videos of spoils being unloaded, only being loaded.

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There's video on YouTube somewhere of a JCB unloading the barytes ore off the wagons at Foynes. As the spoils are really just an updated barytes wagon and indeed the Barytes wagons were used on weekends as spoil wagons elsewhere on the network (hint hint IRM, these would have wide enough appeal I would have thought) I can't imagine the modern day unloading would look all that different. But maybe they have something better than a JCB these days though I'd imagine it's still the right job most of the time. 

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Hi The problem with vehicles without end covers and the middle deflector plus the side angle fillets  flat areas become temporary home for stone which then have unerring accuracy to hit passing windows on other traffic passing! A loads inspector would require all cleaning off before departing a worksite - all time and money preventing something that still happened despite efforts on site. The self cleaning effect of the sloping sides is a much more efficient way of keeping work to time and remove the risk of broken windows and injured bystanders on platforms.       

Clam shell bucket on a 360 head very effective at clearing a wagon out so only the odd shovel full left. With the paranoia over dust dangers I guess that washing out a dismounted body would do the same.    The whole scheme works very well and allows wagons to be used for revenue work if required in the future. Much cheaper solution to the various bogie and 4 wheel shallowsided  box wagons produced by Railtrack and Network rail.

Robert 

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