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Removing decals

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heirflick
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Hi

 

This might help!

 

Mr George Dent recommends using T-Cut on a cotton bud.

 

murrayec

 

used that method before and no matter how short a time i left the fluid on it removed some of the shine on the paint work - thanks for that anyway.

 

grahams resprays suggests hot water to remove the sealer and mets for the decal - tried that on an old loco but the same effect. might look like i will have to weather the feck out of the cabs to cover it!

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I think Anthony once recommended a sharp scalpel and a steady hand to remove decals........ :confused:

 

It can be done like that, even I've managed it that way. The larger curved blades are better, I find, and you can systematically 'plane' the area in question.

 

10_swann_morton_scalpel_blade.jpg

 

The straight edged blades have much more of a risk of leaving scratches or grooves.

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Hi

 

Mr Dent recommends buffing the area with a toothbrush and good quality cotton buds after doing the T-Cut, the toothbrush removes any small scratches left by the T-Cut and leaves a good shine. If you are putting on new decals a spray of gloss varnish first will aid decal adhesion.

 

I have done this with very good results, I did finish the whole model with a coat of varnish.

 

I agree with Anthony, don't use a blade

 

murrayec

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Shem, grab some brake fluid and coat the area in question with it. If you only want to remove decals, leave it on for only a few minutes, and a cocktail stick will encourage their removal. Leaving it on for longer will remove the paint beneath. T- cut only works for factory painted models.

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Shem, grab some brake fluid and coat the area in question with it.

 

Playing with fire there. If the model has already been painted by hand or airbrush some break fluids can react in seconds with the paint. Also some lima factory painted stock can also react very quickly to break fluid. As I said playing with fire can write a model of in seconds brake fluid should only be used if your looking to strip the model completely of paint.

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As I said playing with fire can write a model of in seconds brake fluid should only be used if your looking to strip the model completely of paint.

 

Even that wont work sometimes, the brake fluid might react with the plastic,never mind the paint and you end up with a pile of sludge

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Even that wont work sometimes, the brake fluid might react with the plastic,never mind the paint and you end up with a pile of sludge

 

The only ones I found you need to watch are the old lima BR blue whatever type of plastic is in these they can become quite brittle. I've never had a problem with using brake fluid for stripping paint of anything else.

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rigtht lads - thanks to all for the comments. i tried bith break fluid and t cut on old locos and both work fine, but it leaves the paint work dull, so i will need a quick blast of gloss varnish. one word...'GENTLE!!'... be as gentle as you can with the rubbing and be sure to try it out on old unwanted stock to perfect the removal before trying out on the new!

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Heirflick, hope you had success removing the decals & Johnsons Kleer? I have just removed Kleer from a Bachmann US loco tender. I used a solution of caustic soda in water applied with a cotton bud, then scrubbed the area gently with a small sponge and neautralized the caustic solution with water and a wipe off with kitchen towel. After its dry, 24hrs, any white marks need removing with water & the kitchen roll and leave to dry again.

So Far,36hrs, no ill effects to model or to the paint and no paint was evident on the cotton bud during the process. On the bottle of Kleer it suggests using ammonia to remove Kleer from floors but I had no ammonia!

Shall not be using Johnsons Kleer on any models again.

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