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murrayec
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Hi

 

I'm quite fond of Iain Rice's model books

 

At the Bray show last weekend I got a copy of Rice's new book from Diarmuid Byrne's stand - 'Steam Locomotives' Realistic Railway Modelling. Haynes.

 

There is a wealth of information in this book for the modelling beginner and for the experienced. A lot of the stuff I read before in his previous publications but this new book updates the info with the added features- typical of Haynes, excellent introduction to everything, loads of clear photos and loads of tips & techniques.

 

I bet Diarmuid will be at Parks Hotel, Stillorgan, next weekend

 

You must take a look

 

murrayec

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Likewise a big fan of the Chagford fireman. He has the ability to make believe what he describes is achievable by everyone. Amusing too. His layout design books are some of my all time favourites - Finescale in Small Spaces and Light Railwsys especially.

My own absolute essentials are:

The Art of Weathering by Martyn Welch, essential for getting colour right and applicable to the whole layout, not just stock.

Landscape Modelling by Barry Norman, the instigator of modern scenic techniques

Both tree books by Gordon Gravett ,plus his new book on grass, roads and mud. Builds perfectly on the above and the best 25 quid you can spend this year.

If you can get them, John Ahern's books on buildings and locos from the 1950s cover all the basics and are still very useful today, while Geoff Holts two books on loco building and David Jenkinson's one carriages make these challenging topics very achievable.

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David The Art of Weathering is a Bible for anyone dipping their toes into the weathering pool. The colour pics of the 7mm models at the end of the book are still my favourite pics of models in any scale, your own would give them a good run for their money though. I love his eureka moment when he accidentally spills some paint into the mix whilst searching for that silver hue in weathered wood, pure class.

 

As you say Gordon Gravett is at the forefront of his field of scenic modelling. Although there is no substitute for honing your own skills I think these books teach the reader a lot more than videos do. Barry Norman is a fantastic modeller also. I remember seeing one of his creations once portraying a mucky walkway between fields and imagining shoes sinking into the mud.

 

Rich,

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Had the pleasure of helping Barry with Petherick many years ago at the Chatham show. He broke the mould with his 3' long, but 5' deep baseboards. They were seriously heavy though! Thankfully, he has refined his ideas since then.

Though not exactly in with this thread, while I am here, will mention Trevor Nunn's S gauge East Lynn, which was also completely fabulous and a joy to operate. Worth reading any articles by him too, though in a different league to most mortals. Anyone who can put inside working Joy valve gear in a 4-4-0 deserves the accolade in my book anyway.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Likewise a big fan of the Chagford fireman. ....

 

He got his fingers burnt trying to run RailModel Digest. That's what I remember him for.

 

If you can get them, John Ahern's books on buildings and locos from the 1950s cover all the basics and are still very useful today, while the late Geoff Holts two books on loco building and David Jenkinson's one carriages make these challenging topics very achievable.

 

Another long-gone, but still useful book is Roche & Templer's "Building Model Locomotives". It was published by Ian Allan in the early 1970s. Worth getting hold of.

 

Don't forget the late Guy Williams' three books on building 4mm scale engines (the last two being from Wild Swan),

 

WilliamsModelLocoConst.jpg

 

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1705049.JPG

 

 

plus Stephen Williams' (no relation to Guy) books on building 4mm scale coaches.

Edited by Horsetan
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Though 50 years old, the Ahern books still do all the basic techniques well. Guy Williams built much of Pendon's stock - 'nuff said. Check out the late Geoff Holts recent books on loco construction too. He built much of Pete Waterman's collection and though the absolute master craftsman writes and illustrates in a way that makes you believe you can go a fair way to emulating him. Could well become the new 'bible' for such work.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Greetings, Diarmuid Byrne (Weir Park Books) - I have just joined the forum and I hope I can from time to time help members trace "out of print" material and bring new items to the notice of members. I normally take a table at the Bray Wheelers' Fair, Clarion Liffey Valley (to be Carlton Airport Hotel from now on) Fair and Chris Dyer's Stillorgan Fair. I stock a good selection of both new and out-of-print model rail "how to" titles and general rail titles. Also, if anyone has any books they wish to dispose of, I would be delighted to talk to them about same at the Fairs; I'm always looking out for items for my own collection and for re-sale on the stand. Regards to all on the Forum and a very Happy Christmas and a Peaceful New Year!

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  • 1 month later...

Hi

 

For you Warbonnet as per discussion on etched kit building;-

 

George Dent does a good job on soldering brass kits in 'Kit Building For Railway Moddelers Vol 1 - Rolling Stock' Crowood Press. DermoBookman has this one in stock.

 

or

 

Ian Rice's book 'Etched Kit Building' by Wild Swan- I got a copy at http://titfield.co.uk/Book_shelves/A3_main.htm. They have the Holt books (the Bible) also but a bit pricey!

 

murrayec

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Hi

 

For you Warbonnet as per discussion on etched kit building;-

 

George Dent does a good job on soldering brass kits in 'Kit Building For Railway Moddelers Vol 1 - Rolling Stock' Crowood Press. DermoBookman has this one in stock.

 

or

 

Ian Rice's book 'Etched Kit Building' by Wild Swan- I got a copy at http://titfield.co.uk/Book_shelves/A3_main.htm. They have the Holt books (the Bible) also but a bit pricey!

 

murrayec

 

Thanks man, I have done some reading on it and have a kit or two ready to go. I guess I'm just one of those muppets who needs to see someone do it before it all sinks in! Looking at the stuff George is posting on his workbench with serious envy! The end result always looks worth the effort, and the brass finish with a nice paint job looks a million dollars.

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  • 10 months later...

Hi All

 

I picked up a copy of 'Scratch-Building Model Railway Locomotives' by Simon Bolton, from Diarmuid (DermoBookman) at the last Bray Show of 2014.

 

Interestingly the author uses a J15 locomotive as the main example throughout the book, the loco is not dissimilar to our J15, and with a bit of drawing modification one would have a fantastic set of instructions to scratch build a J15. The book only deals with the build of models with a slight introduction to the tools used- soldering technique and painting is not included, although in the construction soldering hints are suggested, and when not to- recommending using glue. Great pictures and easy to follow text with a lot of tips n tricks.

 

Definitely a very handy addition to the model building reference bookshelf and perfect for a novice teetering on the edge of opening that etched kit-bought 10 years ago, and melting solder.

 

 

Irish J15;- http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/content.php/327-DSER-NO-15-%28RPSI-no-461%29

 

Eoin

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Hi All

 

I picked up a copy of 'Scratch-Building Model Railway Locomotives' by Simon Bolton, from Diarmuid (DermoBookman) at the last Bray Show of 2014.

 

Interestingly the author uses a J15 locomotive as the main example throughout the book, the loco is not dissimilar to our J15, and with a bit of drawing modification one would have a fantastic set of instructions to scratch build a J15. The book only deals with the build of models with a slight introduction to the tools used- soldering technique and painting is not included, although in the construction soldering hints are suggested, and when not to- recommending using glue. Great pictures and easy to follow text with a lot of tips n tricks.

 

Definitely a very handy addition to the model building reference bookshelf and perfect for a novice teetering on the edge of opening that etched kit-bought 10 years ago, and melting solder.

 

 

Irish J15;- http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/content.php/327-DSER-NO-15-%28RPSI-no-461%29

 

Eoin

 

A loco like 461 or one of the WLWR 0-6-0s would be a better choice than a J15 for a first scratch build. The curly Beyer running plate on most small GSWR makes building the locos especially tricky.

 

Drew Donaldson used to use a jig or fixture for forming GSWR valence & running boards. The SSM J15 valence is designed with a sacrificial reinforcing strip that keeps everything in line until the curves in the running board are formed.

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