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Thanks Rich,

 

Time to put a dedicated page up on SSM for modellers with a selection of photos as well, it's not like I don't have enough of them!

 

Des if you want to put up any of my pics of the prototype signals please feel free to use them mate.

 

Rich,

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Des if you want to put up any of my pics of the prototype signals please feel free to use them mate.

 

Rich,

 

Rich, thanks for that, very much appreciated, fair to say, you have a few that I don't even have!

 

Would some of those be Clonmel and Waterford now perchance?

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Rich, thanks for that, very much appreciated, fair to say, you have a few that I don't even have!

 

Would some of those be Clonmel and Waterford now perchance?

 

They Would indeed Des. Next time I am up in Clonmel I will get a couple of pics of the mother and child signal on the Tipp side of the Road bridge. If you look at the signals in your range of SSM kits Des they are all in Clonmel as are the LC gates on the Tipp side of the station. You have saved me a lot of hard work in trying to source parts in the past or scratch building. Taking pride of place on the front of the station building when it gets built will be an SSM post box.

 

Rich,

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  • 2 months later...

Brian Solomon has this photo of a bracket signal

 

Note the difference in the size of the red spectacle - the subsidiary arm has a much smaller "red", and a correspondingly longer "green" segment; there used to be examples of this all over the system, including one on the Quay end of the Westport "up" platform. My question is when was that variation was first introduced? Was it a GSR pattern, or a CIE design?

 

Also, are there any photos of the current IR LED colour light signal heads?

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Anybody got photo's of light signal, old & modern. Also any ground signals would be nice as a guide to modeling please.

 

Popeye, just to let you know, Studio Scale Models has the full range of irish signals

Semaphore: old and new style, including junction types.

Light Signals: old and new style (1, 2 and 3 aspect) including old and new type direction feathers

Ground signals: Mechanical and working electrical (3 and 4 aspect)

 

 

Drop me a line if you need more detail

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BTW, Weshty, when we click the links on your individual signal kits, they don't actually link to anything..... :confused:

 

.....Ground signals: .... working electrical (3 and 4 aspect)

 

I'm familiar with the 3-light ground signal (or GPL), as it's the same as on the British system.

 

I'd only seen the 4-light version in a few photos - what do its individual indications mean?

Edited by Horsetan
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BTW, Weshty, when we click the links on your individual signal kits, they don't actually link to anything..... :confused:

 

 

 

I'm familiar with the 3-light ground signal (or GPL), as it's the same as on the British system.

 

I'd only seen the 4-light version in a few photos - what do its individual indications mean?

 

They're not meant to. The link on all was a default on the page when set up and I have added detailed photos where possible.

 

Regarding the four light, it's something to do with extra safety.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_railway_signals

 

 

You can get the real one here:

http://www.rivval.com/acatalog/LED_TECHNOLOGY__4_Aspect_Led_Ground_Signal.html

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BTW, Weshty, when we click the links on your individual signal kits, they don't actually link to anything..... :confused:

 

 

 

I'm familiar with the 3-light ground signal (or GPL), as it's the same as on the British system.

 

I'd only seen the 4-light version in a few photos - what do its individual indications mean?

 

Here is a good guide to signalling, should help you out.

 

British Signalling - What the Driver Sees

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Brian Solomon has this photo of a bracket signal

 

Note the difference in the size of the red spectacle - the subsidiary arm has a much smaller "red", and a correspondingly longer "green" segment; there used to be examples of this all over the system, including one on the Quay end of the Westport "up" platform. My question is when was that variation was first introduced? Was it a GSR pattern, or a CIE design?

 

Also, are there any photos of the current IR LED colour light signal heads?

 

The spectacle plate on the small arm is of an older GSR/CIE pattern (timber arm with alum sheet bolted on) than that on the big arm (made entirely of aluminium, CIE/IR/IE era)

 

Imagine making the red section bigger would be erring on the side of *ahem* caution.

Edited by minister_for_hardship
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  • 2 weeks later...

The rectangular ones are section / running signals. They are used to show that the line ahead is clear and you may proceed. The circular signals are shunt signals, they allow you to proceed as far as the line is clear, meaning that there could be a train ahead. These are typically found around stations and yards where shunting movements are usually found. The distance you can travel using a shunt signal is controlled by the limit of shunt board (usually a white background with black letters saying Limit of Shunt” and a red light) meaning you could not travel between stations using the shunt signal.

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I should emphasize that both signals in the second pic are shunt signals and the one on the right in the first pic is the running signal. But I have no idea why one is a circle and the other is a square. It is possible that something got broken they replaced it with what ever was to hand

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These shunt discs are a minefield. I think CIE tended to use more of the square-faced ones.

 

If I tilt my head clockwise, the shape and appearance of the red and blue lenses on the circular disc appear similar to the design used on the Great Western Railway / BR (Western Region)

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These shunt discs are a minefield. I think CIE tended to use more of the square-faced ones.

 

If I tilt my head clockwise, the shape and appearance of the red and blue lenses on the circular disc appear similar to the design used on the Great Western Railway / BR (Western Region)

 

 

The round discs are very much a rarity now.

They tended to be enamelled (like an old enamel sign) rather than alum. sheet like the square discs(!) so prob some old ones were still hanging around in stores.

I know of ex BR stuff that was used over here, like a LNER marked signal lamp being used in an Irish lamp shed. Round disc may be BR(W), there's a blue tinge to the green glass you don't usually see here.

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The round discs are very much a rarity now.

They tended to be enamelled (like an old enamel sign) rather than alum. sheet like the square discs(!) so prob some old ones were still hanging around in stores.

I know of ex BR stuff that was used over here, like a LNER marked signal lamp being used in an Irish lamp shed. Round disc may be BR(W), there's a blue tinge to the green glass you don't usually see here.

 

Actually, a lot of signals here used blue lenses because when the light shone through them, they produced a green glow... kind of like mixing blue and yellow paint on a pallet to get green.

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