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Harry's Other(battleship) workbench

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Hello all!

So this is my new workbench, for battleships,aircraft, and any other nonsense that is not fully railway related.

Your probably thinking, where the hell have you been,what about your other workbench and why battleships?

well to be honest, the forum is not very active anymore, and i lost interest for a while, but I'm back now

My other workbench..is on hold for now, while i try to get the electrics of 552 to actually work

battleships, because they are my other love, especially British ships

My first project, Trumpeter's 1/350 HMS Hood

And in typical Harry style,I don't even have it yet, It's in the post...:P

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Thanks Lads..

my ultimate plan is to convert you all to battleship fans!

whether you want to or not.......PIMP

 

Well we're not changing the forum title to Irish Battleship Modeller! ;)

 

(PS: stats show forum usership has been steady for this time of year... :))

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Well we're not changing the forum title to Irish Battleship Modeller! ;)

 

(PS: stats show forum usership has been steady for this time of year... :))

 

Far enough..

anyway to start the annexation..takeover.. I mean.. er..

some info on the Hood for those who dont already know about her...

Hood was designed in 1915 as a battlecruiser(a warship with the speed and armour of a cruiser but the guns of a battleship)

The idea for the battlecruiser was that she could kill any other type of cruiser, however due to their big guns they were put in the battleline. After the Battle of Jutland the battlecruier concept was thought of as as flawed and the Hoods design was drastically revised, to a point where she was up to standard with most battleships of the era.

She was to have 3 other sisters, Anson Howe and Rodney, but these were cancelled in 1918.

When Hood was completed in 1920 she was the largest and most powerful warship afloat, and was known for her clean lines and good looks

She was used for many "Show the flag" operations during the 20s and 30s most notable being the 1924 Empire cruise.

From 1929 to 31 she recieved her midlife refit, and then was put right back into service.

Now Hood was one of the Great war ships. These ships had been designed for a battle at close range, in the North Sea

But the range of battles had increased greatly, and these ships were susceptible to "plunging fire" where shells punch through the thin deck armour, directly into the magazines, and then Kaboom..to put it shortly.

The British began a rebuilding program in the 30s, but as Hood was the most modern of these ships she was low priority.

Her rebuild, which was scheduled for 1941 was prevented by the outbreak of WW2

Hood was one of the busiest ships in the navy, and in 1940 helped destroy the french fleet at Mers el Kebir, to prevent it from falling into German hands.One of the French ships, Strasbourg managed to escape the port, and was chased by Hood, unfortunately Hood stripped a turbine, which reduced her speed. She recieved a refit in 1941 fix her turbines and some of her other problems.

 

The British were extremly worried about the new German battleship Bismarck.

Bismarck, if she escaped into the North atlantic would wreak havoc among the convoys the Britain needed so badly

in may 1941 they found out Bismarck was preparing for a sortie.

Hood and the brand new Battleship Prince of Wales sailed to intercept her.

The admiral aboard Hood, Holland was well aware of the problem of plunging fire, and charged Head on, to close the range, so the shells would hit her thickly armoured side, rather than her deck. Charging head on however, meant that she couldnt bring her after guns to bear of Bismarck, giving her the edge.

Holland, believing Hood was out of danger turned Hood to bring her broadside to bear, but he misjudged, she could still be hit through the deck. As she was turning, a shell from bismarck plunged through Hood, right into the magazines

A few seconds later a massive geezer of flame erupted from Hoods deck, in the vicinity of the main mast followed by an enormous explosion, that tore the Mighty ship apart. The stern disappeared almost immediately, but the bow rose vertically into the air. As the bow went down Hood fired a final defiant salvo from her forward turret, before she slipped into darkness. She was gone in less than 3 minutes.

1415 men were lost, and only three survived

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Thanks, Nostalgic. Hardly a long enough engagement to be called a battle as Hood was wiped out by one of the first salvos, and then Bismarck was taken out by a single flimsy biplane hit on her stern gear. The two incidents proved the era of the old out of date battleships was over and naval airpower replaced them.

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Thanks, Nostalgic. Hardly a long enough engagement to be called a battle as Hood was wiped out by one of the first salvos, and then Bismarck was taken out by a single flimsy biplane hit on her stern gear. The two incidents proved the era of the old out of date battleships was over and naval airpower replaced them.

 

True, but one has to remember a hell lot of luck was involved.

Hood was only a minute or two from her immunity zone, so Bismarck got EXTREMLY lucky

And when the swordfish(accidentally) attacked Hms Sheffield, the torps exploded on intact with the water, due to the new mechanism added,these were taken off, and second wave attacked Bismarck successfully

The crew member of the swordfish that got the lucky hit hung out of the plane, to tell the other crew when to drop the torpedo.

But Bismarck is really overrated, for her tonnage, she was underpowered, especially compared to the the British and American "treaty battleships", which were restricted to 35,000 tons and 16 inch guns, which had better protection and were more powerful.

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]25275[/ATTACH]

That is awesome

How's Prinz Eugen getting along?

( If anyone else wants to put up pics of their own warships, go ahead!

Will keep the thread interesting while I wait for Hood to arrive!)

Edited by GSR 800
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Here is my Revell Bismarck,prior to clean up and (eventually) painting

image.jpg

 

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The pics were taken from my iPad, so that's why they're awful..

(BTW, the Revell Bismarck is branded at 1/700, but it looks more like 1/650

1/600 because lengthwise,it is almost the exact same legth as the tamiya Hood even though Bismarck was actually a good 40 feet shorter)

Edited by GSR 800
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Hi GSR 800, Nice work on the Dreadnough. The aircraft carrier is a 1/350 Tamiya Enterprize.

The Prinz Eugen, I'm still building the dry dock.......=))

Regards

Bren

 

Thanks, Enterprise looks great herself!

I'm sure PE will look fantastic too!

Wonder if anyone would do Prince of Wales..

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it,s BIGGER :ROFL:

 

Bejesus!

The only way to beat a big gigantic monster, is to build your own, big giant monster..

This never built British battleship would have kicked Yamatos ass...

Not my model though!

 

But Yamato looks Epic!

Edited by GSR 800
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Nice work! A battleship is on my to do list. I remember building HMS Belfast as a kid.

 

If you are on Facebook, check out Chris floodberg ship models. His builds are brilliant but his seascapes are the best I've ever seen.

Thanks!

I built Belfast when I was younger too...I think she is at the bottom of loch Ennel now!

I looked up Chris Flodberg...Mind blowing stuff, the seascapes are incredible!

Click the link to see! https://www.facebook.com/flodbergshipmodels/

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I may have a (paper) picture somewhere of a case that I made for a wooden Cutty Sark model that a friend made. The model was over a metre long and nearly as high. I persuaded him that we could make it appear to 'float' in the case. I made a Perspex box, just higher than the draught of the boat, with a cut-out in the top that the boat 'sank' into, up (or down!) to its waterline, and a green marble Fablon covering to the base of the case. All this fitted just inside the main Perspex case and it did work very well.

 

Marking out the shape of the necessary hole was delicate, but fairly easy once the boat had been mounted on blocks at the right height, and a vertically mounted pencil, cut to the waterline height was moved round the hull to mark the shape of the hull at the waterline - this was then cut out of the horizontal part of the internal box.

 

I used Perspex for this case as it would have been seriously heavy with glass of a suitable thickness in it - and then realised that cutting a boat-shaped hole in it was quite feasible.

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]25287[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]25288[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]25289[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]25290[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]25291[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]25292[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]25293[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]25294[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]25295[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]25296[/ATTACH]

Holy Moly!

Yamato is certainly a big beast!

Victory looks fantastic, the rigging must have taken months!

Love the torpedo boat,

A lot of people use stretched sprue for rigging, which is an excellent idea. I don't think I will have rigging on Hood, I don't have the patience for that sort of thing:)

Edited by GSR 800
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I may have a (paper) picture somewhere of a case that I made for a wooden Cutty Sark model that a friend made. The model was over a metre long and nearly as high. I persuaded him that we could make it appear to 'float' in the case. I made a Perspex box, just higher than the draught of the boat, with a cut-out in the top that the boat 'sank' into, up (or down!) to its waterline, and a green marble Fablon covering to the base of the case. All this fitted just inside the main Perspex case and it did work very well.

 

Marking out the shape of the necessary hole was delicate, but fairly easy once the boat had been mounted on blocks at the right height, and a vertically mounted pencil, cut to the waterline height was moved round the hull to mark the shape of the hull at the waterline - this was then cut out of the horizontal part of the internal box.

 

I used Perspex for this case as it would have been seriously heavy with glass of a suitable thickness in it - and then realised that cutting a boat-shaped hole in it was quite feasible.

 

Broithe, if you can find it, I would love to see that pic

My own little Cutty sark..which took a bit of damage a while back..

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Plus a few unfinished projects, Put on hold, in anticipation for Hood..

The Iron Duke and KGV

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The Iron duke kit looks like something from the sixties, clunky and with plenty of flash to take off...

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This is the official last photo of Hood, taken from POW as they sailed to intercept Bismarck

image.jpeg

However I have done a lot of searching for other photos of Hood, to no avail, until I found this..

image.jpeg

This photo, if genuine, seems to show Hood literally a second before she exploded.

As you can see,this shows hood as she has brought her broadside to bear, and hasjust fired full salvo,

The jet of flame has erupted from her deck.

What do ye think?

Edited by GSR 800
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I used to do a bit of work for a chap who was a descendant of Admiral Hood - he had a plant hire firm and was as mad as a box of frogs.

 

He had some machines on a road project that involved putting a bridge across a dual carriageway. It wasn't until the girders were hanging off the crane that anybody spotted that there was a still-live lamppost in the middle of the span. A huge site meeting went on with everybody trying to blame each other - whilst he disconnected the wires up the post (and left the others in, so that the remaining lamps would still work) and then sawed the top off with a hacksaw. The stump of the dead lamp was there under the bridge for many years, until the lighting system was renewed and it could be removed.

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I used to do a bit of work for a chap who was a descendant of Admiral Hood - he had a plant hire firm and was as mad as a box of frogs.

 

He had some machines on a road project that involved putting a bridge across a dual carriageway. It wasn't until the girders were hanging off the crane that anybody spotted that there was a still-live lamppost in the middle of the span. A huge site meeting went on with everybody trying to blame each other - whilst he disconnected the wires up the post (and left the others in, so that the remaining lamps would still work) and then sawed the top off with a hacksaw. The stump of the dead lamp was there under the bridge for many years, until the lighting system was renewed and it could be removed.

 

What a strangely rural Irish approach to things, I can see it now..

"You sawed off the top of a lamppost? Isn't that Dangerous!?"

Ah, shure it'll be Grand!"

 

Admiral Horace Hood, was command of one of the three battlecruisers that blew up at Jutland, which was also the day that Hoods keel was laid!

And it was his widow who christened Hood

The irony...

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