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Is this Dun Laoghaire?

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Old Blarney
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Take a look at this link and the photograph on it.

 

http://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/image/xpw042330?search=Dublin&ref=268

 

The text states it is Dun Laoghaire, 1933. While there are similarities to DL,I have my doubts that it is correctly captioned. Looking at the coaches/s in the siding, these have two distinct colours and the complete one looks like a sleeping coach! Any suggestions on where this is?

Edited by Old Blarney
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Noel,

 

Looking at your picture of the RIYC Building, and comparing it to the one posted by me, there can be little doubt with regard to the authenticity of the location. It was the colour and configuration of the coach in the siding that made me question the authenticity. Perhaps that well known fellow - with a penchant for Guinness and upside-down photographs may come to the rescue.

 

My thanks to you and Broithe for your replies.

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Definately Dún Laoghaire. The coach behind the locomotive and the one to its right are presumably in the early 1930s brown & cream livery of the GSR.

The window arrangement is odd and I'd bet the two sets of double windows evenly spaced from the ends are in double doors with a few additional single windows maybe also in doors. I guessing maybe a full brake/parcels or TPO? This would have been on the Dublin-London mail route I presume?

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The window arrangement is odd and I'd bet the two sets of double windows evenly spaced from the ends are in double doors with a few additional single windows maybe also in doors. I guessing maybe a full brake/parcels or TPO? This would have been on the Dublin-London mail route I presume?

 

Dun Laoire was basically a hub for mail traffic from London & the Midlands to the United States, Southern & Western Ireland, with mail trains running through to Cobh and Galway with connecting services from the Cork and Galway main lines to other provincial centres.

 

Through passenger trains ceased to run between Dunlaoire Cork and Galway when the connection to Carlisle Pier was disconnected in connection with the DART electrification works in the early 80s. NIR later extended some of the Enterprise services through to Dun Laoire to connect with the "Mail Boat" but could not compete with the frequent low cost air services between the UK and Northern Ireland

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John,

 

Thank you for posting your Holiday Photographs - I'm thoroughly enjoying them.

 

I was fortunate enough to travel on the locomotive of the first through NIR Train from Belfast to Dun Laoghaire. Somewhere, there should be a photograph of mine recording that trip. I distinctly remember upon our arrival at Connolly Station there being a discussion between the NIR crew and CIE as to whom was to take this train forward to Dun Laoghaire. It was a CIE driver, Inspector and I, who made that trip. After our arrival at Dun Laoghaire, Mallin Station, we went forward Light Engine too the crossover south of the station. When signalled, we crossed to the UP road to run-around our train and rejoin it on the Down road. We were held on the Down road until a southbound DART overtook us by the simple expedient of it using the UP road to continue its journey to Bray. I have often wondered how many passengers boarded the wrong train that day and wondered why they were sped back to Connolly instead of stations south of Dun Laoghaire?

Not sure when you return to New Zealand, have a safe journey,

 

David.

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John,

 

Thank you for posting your Holiday Photographs - I'm thoroughly enjoying them.

 

I was fortunate enough to travel on the locomotive of the first through NIR Train from Belfast to Dun Laoghaire. Somewhere, there should be a photograph of mine recording that trip. I distinctly remember upon our arrival at Connolly Station there being a discussion between the NIR crew and CIE as to whom was to take this train forward to Dun Laoghaire. It was a CIE driver, Inspector and I, who made that trip. After our arrival at Dun Laoghaire, Mallin Station, we went forward Light Engine too the crossover south of the station. When signalled, we crossed to the UP road to run-around our train and rejoin it on the Down road. We were held on the Down road until a southbound DART overtook us by the simple expedient of it using the UP road to continue its journey to Bray. I have often wondered how many passengers boarded the wrong train that day and wondered why they were sped back to Connolly instead of stations south of Dun Laoghaire?

Not sure when you return to New Zealand, have a safe journey,

 

David.

 

Hi David

 

We arrived home safe and sound in Hamilton on Sunday evening after a hectic week travelling by automobile, train, planes, and automobile, now have t get used to driving on the right hand side of the road again :confused:

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Noel,

 

Looking at your picture of the RIYC Building, and comparing it to the one posted by me, there can be little doubt with regard to the authenticity of the location. It was the colour and configuration of the coach in the siding that made me question the authenticity. Perhaps that well known fellow - with a penchant for Guinness and upside-down photographs may come to the rescue.

 

My thanks to you and Broithe for your replies.

 

Hard to make out, but the coaches behind the loco are probably the sort of old DSER 6-wheelers so prevalent on the coastal and Harcourt St suburban lines at the time.

 

The coach in the background is a full brake in GSR main line brown and cream, while the darker ones are in the older all-deep-Crimson-lake used on all stock until 1929, and secondary / 6-wheel / branch line stock until after 1933.

 

The 4th vehicle in the train is also brown and cream, and while partly obscured is almost certainly a DSER bogie third.

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Nice pic of Carlisle Pier beside the 'George'

 

http://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/image/xpw042263?search=Dublin&ref=249

 

2-1-1.jpg2-2-1.jpg

 

That's what I call integrated transport. Unlike now - Rosslare harbour platforms are a gazillion miles away from the ferry quay instead of beside like it used to be, and Dublin airport lacks a rail link to the city centre and intercity rail network, and you can't start a rail journey from Bray or Malahide, to Cork, Waterford, Limerick or Galway cities.

Edited by Noel
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Hi

 

These photos reveal great information on the rails within the harbour;-

 

Two turntables installed on Carlisle Pier- one at the base and one at the end.

The gates at the back of the Kingstown Railway Co Line to access the New Wharf by way of a bridge over the Revenue Stores Harbour.

The Kingstown Railway Co shed roof.

 

Eoin

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