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22K ICRs

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Sulzer201
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Hi all,

Brought the young lads for a spin today as far as Heuston to have a look at the station and trains. What struck me was the sheer dominance of the 22k's there. A 201 arrived in from Cork, in pushing mode and apart from it, this was a desert of 22k's - not to take away from them, they are a fine looking train in their own right, clean, comfortable and efficient I'm sure. Just three questions come to mind about them; (1) How is the power from the engine transmitted to the wheels on each bogie? it is very cleverly done when you consider that they are not D.E. with no traction motors on the bogies, (2) What is the projected life expectancy of the 22k's and, (3) What type of trains will replace them? Thanks in advance all.

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Hi all,

Brought the young lads for a spin today as far as Heuston to have a look at the station and trains. What struck me was the sheer dominance of the 22k's there. A 201 arrived in from Cork, in pushing mode and apart from it, this was a desert of 22k's - not to take away from them, they are a fine looking train in their own right, clean, comfortable and efficient I'm sure. Just three questions come to mind about them; (1) How is the power from the engine transmitted to the wheels on each bogie? it is very cleverly done when you consider that they are not D.E. with no traction motors on the bogies, (2) What is the projected life expectancy of the 22k's and, (3) What type of trains will replace them? Thanks in advance all.

 

1. Sorcery

2. 39 Leptons

3. Magnetic Levitation units

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Yes UP, I'm aware they use a hydraulic transmission alright but it is cleverly done on those and similar diesel hydraulic units - to get power from the main engine directly into the bogies, which, must swivel etc. I know this technology is around for yonks but it's still neatly packed underfloor on those trains. When they are finally deemed life expired - I wonder will IR give any consideration to electrifying the main lines? Thanks UP.

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I would imagine that national spatial strategies and european development directives would point to higher speed rail links + connectivity to aviation hubs which would require serious pinger being spent on upgrading the permanent way. Europe would help out with that project, but electrifying the network is a retrograde step that Europe won't part fund.

 

I had the good fortune to read one of those publications for the exams before christmas, and there is a definite bent on maximising the cross country freight links to ports for 2020 to 30. Chinese exporters want to get their crap in to europe via the island of ireland. Either way, expect to see the ICR'S on irish steels until 2035. Personally I think they are superb, look good, perform well, are clean and comfortable.

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From the IRRS

 

Powerplant and drive train was chosen from MTU of Germany, a subsidiary of Mercedes Benz. MTU is a very well regarded rail engine supplier. The engine fully meets the demanding EU emissions directive Class 3a and is the most advanced currently available in terms of emissions. The MTU under-floor “raft” combines the engine (rated at 360kW), Voith hydrodynamic transmission, 3-phase auxiliary power generation, cooling systems, fire protection, hydraulic systems and exhaust silencer all located in a suspended ”H” frame which allows for easy removal. An identical raft is fitted under every vehicle and operates independently. There is a certain amount of power sharing between vehicles in degraded operation and it is an area being looked at currently for further improvement.

 

Each raft drives a pair of adjacent wheelsets on each vehicle thus every vehicle is mechanically identical in terms of drive train with 1 x raft, 1 x powered bogie and 1 x trailer bogie. The raft also features a dynamic retarder brake through the Voith gearbox which is very efficient and reduces brake wear considerably.

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Would relish the thought of a ready to run or even kit build 22K. I really like these railcars. I know there not everyones cup of tea, but they are a quality piece of kit. I remember the rubbish that used to be on the line between Waterford and Dublin (ancient Mk2s well past their sell by date....ughh!). And it wasnt a million years ago. These were a godsend! Compared to what you'd find on many regional and commuter lines in the UK, the really are a superior piece of kit. If I have a criticism of these it would probably be the unimaginative livery choices (paint it silver/grey to make it look modern). In my world they'd be Orange/black n white strip/purple flash (ala old Enterprise) at the carridge doors/full yellow ends.

Interesting comments in the electrification of mainlines. Yeah, i couldnt see it happening to be honest. Extension of electrification to the suburban commuter areas yes probably. Outside of that, probably not. It would be much more benificial to improve the permanent way, increasing the average linespeeds, weeding out congestions etc.... Thus making rail an attractive alternative to motorway travel / road freight etc... The stock 201s, 22Ks surely have the legs for higher speed?

OK rant over.

Regards

Tom.

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