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A few random photos

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jhb171achill
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The first is blurred; with good reason. It's a case of "now you see it, now you don't"! Whhooooosssshhhhhhhh! It's 1939, and 800 goes charging down the main line near (a very rural) Clondalkin on one of its test runs.

 

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Next up, an NCC narrow gauge tank at Larne about 1938.

 

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The rest - these bring back more recent memories.... mostly 1978.

 

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The following were taken between 1976 and 1978. First, two ex-GNR vans (of standard Dundalk 1954 ancestry) in the former Rock Street goods yard, Tralee. The one on the right is in CIE 1960s light grey, the left hand one despite having been repainted brown, still shows signs of its original "G N" lettering. This phenomenon was common in UTA repaints, which were very cheaply and badly done, but not CIE.

 

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Silver container, on silver-painted flat, as a barrier wagon. Possibly Asahi origin, though not used as such when photographed.

 

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Next, grain.

 

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Rest in Piece (s)

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A GSWR relic: by no means the only one forty years ago.

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Standard. No 1960-80 layout is complete without one - and pristine ones were rare!

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Draperstown (I think), 1947.

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Hard to believe this was Heuston Station goods yard in 1978.

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E434 plays with a Mk. 2

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Ballynahinch Junction, 1976. Despite oft-repeated theories about how it would become a huge preservation centre, forty years later the site is, sadly, obliterated.

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Hard to believe this was Heuston Station goods yard in 1978.

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E434 plays with a Mk. 2

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Ballynahinch Junction, 1976. Despite oft-repeated theories about how it would become a huge preservation centre, forty years later the site is, sadly, obliterated.

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Sorry those links are not working. Would love to see the one of Heuston Goods yard.

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Great pic of draperstown

 

I can't say for certain where it is, but it definitely isn't Draperstown; looking closely there appear to be two platforms, and the terminus at Draperstown only had one; also the signal box/signal/station building positioning wouldn't be correct. The loco is a V class goods, there were just three of these and (in rebuilt form) all lasted until the early 1960's.

 

If Jhb171achill is happy I'll post that one on RM Web, which has a pretty broad reach of railway types, and see what comes up from the sleuths who like poring over old station photographs.

 

Colm F

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I can't say for certain where it is, but it definitely isn't Draperstown; looking closely there appear to be two platforms, and the terminus at Draperstown only had one; also the signal box/signal/station building positioning wouldn't be correct. The loco is a V class goods, there were just three of these and (in rebuilt form) all lasted until the early 1960's.

 

If Jhb171achill is happy I'll post that one on RM Web, which has a pretty broad reach of railway types, and see what comes up from the sleuths who like poring over old station photographs.

 

Colm F

 

I hate mysteries! Having spent the period doing some Sherlock Holmes between my earlier post and this with some relevant books, I reckon it is Ballyclare Junction.

 

Colm

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I hate mysteries! Having spent the period doing some Sherlock Holmes between my earlier post and this with some relevant books, I reckon it is Ballyclare Junction.

 

Colm

 

No problem, Colm, your detective work is appreciated. I've a few more, including this one of the H & W diesel towing an NCC railcar, as a passenger train apparently; presumably it had failed somewhere. I don't know the location but may be able to find out.

 

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These are the ones which wouldn't post earlier plus a few more.

 

First one's for Nelson! I think it was taken either during a 1938 visit, or about 1942/3. Again, I should be able to establish exact dates and locations once I have gone through various lists.

 

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Port Laoise, 1977. Demolished very soon afterwards.

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The next few are Ballynahinch Junction, 1978. All obliterated now.

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Ballynahinch Station, June 1978. Old UTA (or possibly BCDR) signs still above bricked-up doors. They are in faded UTA green as far as I can see, probably not BCDR green - though I wouldn't rule it out. It's interesting to see "freight office" instead of "goods office" on a sign dating from at least the 1960s.

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The NCC breakdown crane in NIR maroon about 1972. I think I took this at Ballymena. Maroon paint, NIR logo; no gaudy bright yellow then, thank goodness.

 

With all my wittering on about the importance of the availability of accurate historical livery information, and the ongoing failure of the preservation organisations to take it seriously, I have to hold my hands up and confess here. This is the RPSI's iconic, and fascinating, "Rosslare Express" relic, GSWR 861 of 1906. It never wore a livery remotely like that and nor did anything else here.... but.... yes, it was I who played a hand in painting it; my first ever job in the overall preservation world. As I've said here and there in defence of those who do the same - it's often a case of the person who can be bothered to turn up and slave away is the man who decides - or, a case of just get it painted because it's needed for a tour, and maroon is what's there.... Guilty, m'lud.

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Headford Junction, Co Kerry, June 1978, from loco cab.

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Above and the following: Heuston Goods. Neither a 747 bus, roundabout, portakabin or "park-by-text" machine in sight. In those days, text was in books and newspapers, believe it or not!

 

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And that dog WANTED my ankles. Badly.

 

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Nearby, an E plays with coaches.

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Meanwhile in Connolly....

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And meanwhile in de rebel shtate boy

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I know, I know.... but a 450 has been preserved. Same comfort levels. Ghastly, ghastly things to travel in. Lisburn, 08:35 all stops to Central, 1977.

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I hate mysteries! Having spent the period doing some Sherlock Holmes between my earlier post and this with some relevant books, I reckon it is Ballyclare Junction.

 

Colm

 

I would agree with Colm. It certainly looks like Ballyclare Junction. There is a good picture of Ballyclare Junction on P57 of 'The UTA in Colour' albeit without the footbridge.

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"Senior" recalled a day at Kildare watching such things, and then getting the train back to Dublin. It was running very late and was headed by a J15 with a couple of bogies and a couple of six wheelers. It set sail for Kingsbridge and took off like the clappers. I can't put my hand at present to the timings, but the loco comfortably topped 60 on the way...... not what many would expect from a J15, but back in the day not unknown.

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No problem, Colm, your detective work is appreciated. I've a few more, including this one of the H & W diesel towing an NCC railcar, as a passenger train apparently; presumably it had failed somewhere. I don't know the location but may be able to find out.

 

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Well, well, that one's a real find! (if you look at the irish group on RM web you'll see why I say that...

 

I think once again, it is Ballyclare Junction, the vehicle is actually an LMSNCC railcar trailer, one of two special lightweight ones they built. I guess 28 was being substituted for a railcar as it did run some local services on the NCC line, both to Antrim (possibly Ballymena) and Larne.

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Lovely pictures. I was just looking at the O'Dea collection on the National Library website (http://catalogue.nli.ie/Browse/Collection?from=O) and noticed how often there was a Pullman on the Cork or Galway trains (2nd coach behind 800). Always seemed to be in brown and cream in the late 30s. Do you know were they rated as 1st class, or was there some Pullman supplement. I gather the GSR took them over after a while, but don't know when.

 

The Heuston goods shed was huge - I've never seen a picture of it before.

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Lovely pictures. I was just looking at the O'Dea collection on the National Library website (http://catalogue.nli.ie/Browse/Collection?from=O) and noticed how often there was a Pullman on the Cork or Galway trains (2nd coach behind 800). Always seemed to be in brown and cream in the late 30s. Do you know were they rated as 1st class, or was there some Pullman supplement. I gather the GSR took them over after a while, but don't know when.

 

The Heuston goods shed was huge - I've never seen a picture of it before.

 

I believe there were four Pullman coaches, and all were third class coaches. Most photos I've seen of them before showed them in a derelict state following withdrawal, by which time they wore CIÉ green.

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They were initially GSR maroon, then brown and cream. When maroon, they had "Great Southern Pullman" above window level. I don't think it said Pullman on them when brown and cream, and it certainly didn't when green. The GSR took them over pretty quickly.

 

The practice was to have one in each main line Cork train, and they never ran them as a full train, like they would in the south of England.

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They're in the background on quite a lot of the O'Dea photos, behind Woolwiches, 400s and 500s. It's a real treasure trove of pictures from the 30s and 40s. I haven't looked at the later ones yet.

 

I always wondered how you could have a 3rd class Pullman - isn't Pullman a luxury brand to start with? Anyway, I know there was 3rd class on English Pullman trains - maybe it was a better class of 3rd class travel.

 

Alan

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I think that's the answer, Islandbridge. I always meant to ask Senior what exactly they looked like inside....

 

He did describe the interiors of DSER 6 wheelers on the H Street line - nothing like a Pullman, third class or not.

 

There are photos of Jimmy O'Dea's which show these carriages not just in traffic but at least one lying derelict at Naas in the late fifties. Jimmy was a gentleman - I met him just once, many many moons ago.....

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