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GSR 800

Harrys Workbench

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Do you think it looks warped? It may have just been the angle the loco was at because Put it against a ruler and it looked straight to it. The photos I take at the mo are not great because my good camera is eh... pushing up daisys so im hoping to get a new one. So the ye olde phone camera has to be used and I am not a photographer. If you want to PM me about the loco it would be good as your expertise could make me a bit better with crankpins and wiring.:D

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Have to agree with garfieldsghost, to my Specsavers eyesight the running plate do's look a bit, dare I say warped, it could be as a result of soldering, ie, heat, but I have never soldered anything, have you looked at the pics yourself on a PC or IPad etc.

Edited by burnthebox

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presumably, you have to fill in the front of the firebox etc. I applaud your efforts , if this is one of the first etched brass kits you have done, I find they require a lot of fine work to bring them to conclusion, the " expert" ones look great , but I personally find , it hard to get a good result on complex brass kits.

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Do you think it looks warped? It may have just been the angle the loco was at because Put it against a ruler and it looked straight to it. The photos I take at the mo are not great because my good camera is eh... pushing up daisys so im hoping to get a new one. So the ye olde phone camera has to be used and I am not a photographer. If you want to PM me about the loco it would be good as your expertise could make me a bit better with crankpins and wiring.:D

 

wonky800.jpg

 

I put this together quickly, using the edge of the table as a guide to show that the camera isn't distorting the image with some sort of wide angle or fisheye effect. I'm sorry to report that the running plate is definitely warped (highlighted in red above). As it is, it's going to cause problems when you construct the frames as the body won't sit right on them and the wheels won't line up with the splashers.

 

To fix it, you're going to have to remove the running plate from the rest of the body to try and flatten it, although I'm not sure if it'll be possible to fix the warping completely...

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The 800 class kit is a seriously complicated place to start for an absolute beginner to etched kit building. I'd suggest starting with something simple, like SSM's 30T brake van, then working up to something like a J26 before tackling the 800.

 

I'd also recommend getting a copy of Iain Rice's 'Etched Loco Construction', which covers all aspects in an easy to read manner.

 

Copies available on Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Etched-Loco-Construction-Iain-Rice/dp/090686786X

Although I see it's cheaper from Pendon Museum (not sure of P&P charge though): http://www.pendonmuseum.com/shop/view.php?id=45&category=6

 

or this http://www.amazon.co.uk/MODEL-LOCOMOTIVE-CONSTRUCTION-4MM-SCALE/dp/B001UY6AYK/ref=la_B001HPIMMK_1_9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1431992553&sr=1-9. I treasure my copy

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Dude, I hate to say it, but you've made a total mess of that kit. There are lumps hanging out in parts where they shouldn't and parts that aren't even close to being near where they should be.

 

take the thing apart and start again - and I mean this in the most positive spirit - it will help long term.

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Dude, I hate to say it, but you've made a total mess of that kit. There are lumps hanging out in parts where they shouldn't and parts that aren't even close to being near where they should be.

 

take the thing apart and start again - and I mean this in the most positive spirit - it will help long term.

 

 

We all have to start some where but I do agree with Glenderg's comments. I think GSR 800 you have jumped in at the deep end on this one and destroyed it, you should have taken Garfield and Warbonnets advice at the start of this thread and started with several small brass kits and worked your way up to the level required to start this kit. Hopefully you might be able to salvage something from it but I think the damage is already done.

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Alright lads disassembling no.800. She came out of the situation without any real damage done. Garfield the running plate problem seems to be a bit better now and I think the problem was that the locos cab and buffer plate were sitting while the running plate(which would be about a cm above) would bow from the weight the boiler.the smoke box was not sitting correctly on its saddles so solder was put in to compensate. However this looked unsightly. The smokebox was re rolled and re attached to the saddles and sits on them correctly now.Glenderg the bit hanging out could have been a nut and bolt that have since been removed. The excess solder has been filed and sanded off and the resin cast has been properly fitted to the firebox and smokebox. I have decided to finish her myself. If everything works like it is on its current track i might be finished by the end of summer. Still having an awful time with pick ups. Doesn't seem to be much on rm web about them. Anyway have a new magnifying glass lamp thing which is extremely useful.

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CIE no.402 has been painted, it is now awaiting finishing touches and a chassis of some poor unsuspecting King Arthur.image.jpg this is the only picture I could get the right way up,which is very annoying.

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SSM j26 class

 

Managed to get this yoke started last night, with soldering the bearings onto the framesimage.jpg

The kit comes with the original brass frames, and the more modern nickel silver one. The more modern one is recommended. The original one is designed for compensated frames.image.jpg

Bits and bobsimage.jpg

Edited by GSR 800

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SSM j26 class

 

Managed to get this yoke started last night, with soldering the bearings onto the frames[ATTACH=CONFIG]23022[/ATTACH]

The kit comes with the original brass frames, and the more modern nickel silver one. The more modern one is recommended. The original one is designed for compensated frames.[ATTACH=CONFIG]23023[/ATTACH]

Bits and bobs[ATTACH=CONFIG]23024[/ATTACH]

 

The two types of frames are not interchangeable, as there are slight differences in wheelbase, most likely because of the etch artwork. You can't use the coupling rods from one on the other unless you modify the openings for the hornblocks.

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The two types of frames are not interchangeable, as there are slight differences in wheelbase, most likely because of the etch artwork. You can't use the coupling rods from one on the other unless you modify the openings for the hornblocks.

 

I know mate:tumbsup: Might use the old frames for a turntable or something, like what the CDR did

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Harry

 

It would be worth while to keep the original brass chassis in reserve as a spare if you run into problems or decide at some stage to have a go at 21mm gauge

 

I have a J26 still going strong on the original chassis after nearly 30 years service,which says a lot about the durability and accuracy of the original chassis.

 

A compensated chassis is a better option for a small loco than a rigid one as you get more reliable power pick up with all wheels on the track. The axle and coupling rod centres line up accurately flex-chassis bearings simply slot into the openings in the frames. I used U shaped strips of scrap bass soldered to the inside of the frame to prevent the bearings revolving & made up a keeper plate from strip brass to prevent the wheels dropping out

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Harry

 

It would be worth while to keep the original brass chassis in reserve as a spare if you run into problems or decide at some stage to have a go at 21mm gauge

 

I have a J26 still going strong on the original chassis after nearly 30 years service,which says a lot about the durability and accuracy of the original chassis.

 

A compensated chassis is a better option for a small loco than a rigid one as you get more reliable power pick up with all wheels on the track. The axle and coupling rod centres line up accurately flex-chassis bearings simply slot into the openings in the frames. I used U shaped strips of scrap bass soldered to the inside of the frame to prevent the bearings revolving & made up a keeper plate from strip brass to prevent the wheels dropping out

 

Thanks for the advice John, I believe you have another, with the more modern chassis. How is that going?

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Thanks for the advice John, I believe you have another, with the more modern chassis. How is that going?

 

Stopped waiting parts just like many a CIE loco in the 40s & 50s. I managed to ring the end off one of the coupling rods during assembly :(

 

I should have a replacement set during the next month or so.

Edited by Mayner

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Started the rods today,put in the vice and laminate,

image.jpg

Back in the shop..

image.jpg

image.jpg

Edited by GSR 800

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Pics are a bit all over the place, don't really know what happened..

Anyway, test fitted..image.jpg

Edited by GSR 800

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Been slavin away at getting the running(thanks john) right, and then getting the motor fitted. After a few tests on the driving axle, and a few tweaks, and forty CoT later( they cups are decisively cropped from the picture!) proved successful, tests with the coupling rods were started, which were successful also (yippee!)

At the moment she is a 2-4-0 as, like a total eejit,I managed to shear of some of the crankpins. Better send up some yo yos to Des..image.jpg

Don't mind the mess..

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Indeed! Sound Richie, I suppose Meabh acted as a steep (and suitably expensive) learning curve. At the end of the day I managed to get a good enough model of it, after a hell amount of sanding, but ultimately I should have started with something simpler, like the little j26.

As for the mess, just wait a few months....

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Great to see that you have got it running, even as a 2-4-0 just like my loco! It takes a long time and a lot o practice to build up skill in model making, the great thing about brass and whitemetal kits is that they are usually salvageable.

 

 

The one thing I would suggest is a small jewellers vice and a pin-tongs (available from Eileen's or expotools) for filing, bending and assembling components like rods.http://chestofbooks.com/home-improvement/workshop/Turning-Mechanical/Hand-Vices-And-Pin-Tongs.html

 

DSCF7974.JPG

DSCF7969.JPG

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Well done Harry, good to see someone challenging themselves.

Re those laminated rods, from the pics, looks like you held them in the vice to solder. A better way is to use a couple of small panel pins/tacks, through the crank pin holes into a piece of wood or board. Tin the layers first, flux an then apply the iron.

Take your time and get the chassis rolling smoothly and the rest is cosmetic.

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Well done Harry, good to see someone challenging themselves.

Re those laminated rods, from the pics, looks like you held them in the vice to solder. A better way is to use a couple of small panel pins/tacks, through the crank pin holes into a piece of wood or board. Tin the layers first, flux an then apply the iron.

Take your time and get the chassis rolling smoothly and the rest is cosmetic.

Thanks David. I did indeed use a vice, a rather ancient one at that. Thanks for the idea, I will use it in the future:tumbsup:

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Would anyone be willing to put together a riveted smokebox etch for me?

Would be greatly appreciated.

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Would anyone be willing to put together a riveted smokebox etch for me?

Would be greatly appreciated.

 

I don't remember there being one in the kit. If using the smokebox supplied, then rivets would have to be individually pressed into the brass before it's rolled to shape, and I haven't worked out how many rivets the thing's supposed to have.

 

Might be a bit much to send it over here (London), wait, then pray the smokebox survives Royal Mail and An Post.

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