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Irish Bufferstops

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BosKonay
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Does anyone know what the small metal clamps behind the modern buffers are? I assume from their appearance and location they are designed to 'brake' the buffer should it ever get hit and move?

Don't suppose anyone makes a whitemetal or something version?

 

Just that. They are a sort of additive brake. The buffer stop is merely clamped to the rail such that it will slide, if hit hard enough, but there is quite a bit of friction involved, due to the clamp blocks. If the clamps on the stop itself don't have enough friction to halt the progress, then, the whole assembly will start to slide on the rails. It will then successively 'collect' each pair of additional brakes, thus adding to the friction available in a series of steps, and thus providing a very high braking force when it becomes needed, but not applying such a high force for a smaller impact.

 

To some extent, though, it does rely on those fish-plate bolts surviving the additional force pulling the rails apart, too. That may be why there's a bit of additional ballast - to support each sleeper sideways...

 

Note:- Always check the time of arrival of the next train from Nenagh before using the gents' at Ballybrophy!!

 

 

Those new stops at Heuston are bolted through the rails - you're on your own if you hit them. I suppose that, where they are, there is very little likelihood of them being hit at any real speed - or with passengers aboard..?

Edited by Broithe
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No doubt many cups of tea were drank during it's design phase too, seamus! Here's the top of one I snapped some years ago down the north wall and the front at limerick jct. I assume both are gone to the great scrapheap in the sky.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]5243[/ATTACH]

 

i love those old open wagons!

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gone to the great scrapheap in the sky.

 

I was very impressed that the old one on the ramp of Platform 1 at Ballybrophy survived - the track there was even disconnected during the Great Leap Forward and yet it still wasn't removed. It would be interesting to have a dendrochronological investigation of the old wooden beam - I wonder if it is original?

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I have searched my railway books for pictures of buffers in Goods Yards, Loco Depots but close up and detailed pictures are like "hens teeth"!

 

The ones I have found appeared to have been constructed from old rail and the nearest pro-typical ones I can find in the model world is the PECO ones.

 

SL-40_1367_Qty1_1.jpg

 

I would welcome suggestions if there are better ones than the PECO available.

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Riversuir, PM sent.

Broithe, I remembered the thread you referred to, searched under 'buffers', could not find it but did remember BosKonay raised the thread. So I got lost in his layout pages for an hour without success. Thanks for retrieving it if for nothing else to prove to myself I did not imagine it!

Glenderg - I would probably need the old and the more modern ones.

 

More than pictures I would like recommendations on buffers that are available to buy and look 'Irish' though I am tempted to have a go at the concrete ones in Broithe's link..

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Broithe, I remembered the thread you referred to, searched under 'buffers', could not find it but did remember BosKonay raised the thread. So I got lost in his layout pages for an hour without success. Thanks for retrieving it if for nothing else to prove to myself I did not imagine it!

 

It does come up in a 'buffers' search - but so does rather a lot of other stuff...

 

I have a few more pictures of the Ballybrophy buffers, if you need them.

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They look like ABS castings. bought a 7mm scale set at Reading Trade Show yesterday. They do a range of styles. S&D, also Springside do buffers too. As prototype pics show, there are many different types and for absolute fidelity, one needs to be careful or you could end up with [heaven forbid] GWR buffers on a Highland Railway layout...

Me, I've used Peco in the past, because they are very good value and easy to put together. The ABS ones are in the paint shop at the moment, but will hopefully appear on the Arigna Town turntable siding next week.

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Here is my take on an Irish buffer stop.

Needed one for the other end of the turntable and eventually went for an ABS kit of whitemetal castings. Ditched the rail built beam [too short for broad gauge], in favour of a sleeper, though suspect the corners need clipping.

My usual faffing around with the Grasstech and scatter material completes the scene.DSCN0630.jpg

DSCN0631.JPG

DSCN0609.jpg

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