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Nicknames for liveies

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jhb171achill
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A bit of light seasonal cheer....

 

From railway sources mostly, but often enthusiasts too, I've picked up the following over the years - anyone know any others?

 

CIE 1962-72 livery: black'n'tan

CIE 1972-87 livery: supertrain (or just orange and black)

IE 1987 - recent: Tippex (ie orange and black but with the white lines added

 

IE amended livery for 2600's when first introduced (black and white below windows): Fanta Can

IE livery on later railcars of navy, white and line green (commuter): Lilt can

Current green and silver as on 2600's: Seven-up can, or lately, in comparison to NIR's "red bull" livery, "green bull"!

 

NIR current livery: "red bull"

 

CIE logos:

1945*-1962: flying snail

1962 - 1987: broken wheel

 

IE logos:

1987 - 1990: set o'points

1990 - 2000-ish: three pin plug

2014 onwards: tricolour

 

UTA logos:

1948-1963 red hand

1963-1967 coat of arms

Edited by jhb171achill
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'Black Vomit' gets my vote for the dull old super train livery, but at least they served proper food back then. A time long past when CIE catered for Business travellers. Now the 201s and MkIVs have an attractive livery but no proper catering. I guess the IR/IE tipex and black roof era combined decent food with decent livery. The old Galway livery might best be described as 'lego-like'. :) The flying snail green livery was perhaps the classiest.

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'Black Vomit' gets my vote for the dull old super train livery, but at least they served proper food back then. A time long past when CIE catered for Business travellers. Now the 201s and MkIVs have an attractive livery but no proper catering. I guess the IR/IE tipex and black roof era combined decent food with decent livery. The old Galway livery might best be described as 'lego-like'. :) The flying snail green livery was perhaps the classiest.

 

Beauty, and the Eye of the Beholder, Noel...

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UP, it was BNCR - however, BCDR green was very dark as well. BCDR also used a lighter (almost Isle of Man style) green at some stage - I think it was pre-war; this is what's on No. 30 in Cultra.

 

Ah right I see. Must have gotten the two mixed up!

Thanks for clarifying

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Going off thread a little some of the older companies had nicknames the DSER was known as the Slow & Easy & the unfortunate SLNCR The Sow Lazy and Never Clean. Wonder if there were nicknames for the liveries. The Waterford and Tramore seems to have remained in an 1850s time-warp with ancient but highly polished locos and colour coded 1st & 3rd Class coaches. In the 19th Century wit the exception of the WLWR most companies seem to have some variety lined green locos and "lake" or dark red coaches. In the early 1900s loco lining became more simplified, the Midland tried Royal Blue locos with blue and white coaches, green gave way to lined black on the Donegal, DSER, GNR (I), GSWR, Midland, SLNCR. Grey replaced black on the GSWR during WW1 and became the standard for GSR & CIE steam locos and now IE 071s. Most companies stuck to some form of red for coaches.

 

The DNGR stagnated & stuck with LNWR "Plumb & Custard" for its coaches until closure, the NCC followed on where the WLWR left off following Midland (UK) and LMS practice in terms of locos stock and livery under LMS & BTC management until subsumed into the UTA.

 

For a time Donegal even painted coaches its coaches black before adapting the highly colourful "Geranium Red for its loco with red and cream (Blood & Custard) for railcars and coaches in the 1930s.

 

The GNR followed suit with colourful liveries in the 1930&40s with its "Sky Blue"& Red for its top link & U Class locos, with "Oxford Blue" & cream for its buses and railcars.

 

Unlike the Donegal the Swilly saw its long term future as a road operator and was cutting back on rail operations by the mid 1930s. Despite this steam locos seem to have been well maintained and nicely turned out in lined green up to abandonment of the remaining rail services in 1953, in later years the remaining increasingly shabby coaches were painted grey like the wagon stock.

 

The Swilly developed a stylised LSR diamond logo in the 1930s that was applied to some of the 4-6-0T, 4-6-2T & 4-8-4T locos and even some of the coaches rather than the L&LSR or L&BER initials.

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Mayner's post reminds me of another livery nickname of sorts. Long after the DWWR had taken over the Dublin & Kingstown, they kept in reserve a handful of very old open 4 wheel coaches got many years. At least two survived in occasional traffic as late as the very early years of the 20th century.

 

Despite years having obviously passed since the classes had been colour coded, these carriages remained green, the D & K colour for third class. They ended their life in green, never having received DWWR standard deep maroon. Railwaymen had always referred to them as "the Greens".

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Yes, sorry, Waterford and Tramore

 

Mayner's post reminds me of another livery nickname of sorts. Long after the DWWR had taken over the Dublin & Kingstown, they kept in reserve a handful of very old open 4 wheel coaches got many years. At least two survived in occasional traffic as late as the very early years of the 20th century.

 

Despite years having obviously passed since the classes had been colour coded, these carriages remained green, the D & K colour for third class. They ended their life in green, never having received DWWR standard deep maroon. Railwaymen had always referred to them as "the Greens".

 

Very interesting - did they still bear D&K lettering or lining (if any)?

I imagine that 48 in Cultra would be deemed, "Unprototypical," then?

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I'm not sure if they still bore D & K lettering. It's possible they were repainted green under new ownership, but much more likely they never saw a paintbrush again! They might have been touched up here and there - as recently as late NCC and late GSR days, coaches could go into traffic with one newly painted door on one side, a recently repainted panel on the other, the rest untouched. In UTA days, only 60 years ago, make do and mend paintwork was almost the norm on goods stock!

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  • 10 months later...

Just revisiting this myself - I failed to answer Jawfin's question about the D & K coach in Cultra.

 

Cultra didn't paint it themselves; it was the way it is now way back in Witham Sreeet days, and I suspect it was painted in Inchicore before being brought north at all. It is a third, and given its origin, one would think that it could have been green; maybe that particular one had been repainted, but I don't know. I did search on a couple of occasions for definitive information on what way it would originally have been painted, but like the Ulster Railway coach at Downpatrick, no exact details appear to gave survived.

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