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Strange looking Irish steam loco

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The extended smokebox doors were fitted when the MGWR rebuilt and superheated the Celtic & Connemara Class (GSR D5-7)4-4-0s and B & H Class (GSR J2 & J6) 0-6-0s during the WW1 period. The extending the door allowed the Cusack-Morton supeheater elements to be fitted within an existing smokebox, the cattle engines were built from new with superheaters and did not have this feature.

 

Class D 5 - 548 - M&GWR Class A 4-4-0, built 1904 by Broadstone Works as Midland & Great Western Railway No.126 ATLANTIC - 1925 to GSR as No.548, 1925 rebuilt with Belpaire boiler, 1945 to CIE - with drawn 1955 - seen here near Broadstone - note Pullman car (2nd vehicle) - i of only 3 that ever ran in Ireland.

Rebuilt Celtic MGWR As GSR/CIE D5

 

Class D 6 - 544 - M&GWR Class C1 4-4-0 - built 1915 by Broadstone Works as M&GWR No.11 ERIN-GO-BRAGH - 1925 to GSR as No.544, 1926 rebuilt with Belpaire boiler, 1945 to CIE - withdrawn 1955 - seen here at Kingsbridge.

Rebuilt Connemara MGWR Cs GSR D6/7

 

Class J 5 - 634 - M&GWR Class F 0-6-0, built 1921 by Broadstone Works as M&GWR No.40 - 1925 to GSR as No.634, 1945 to CIE - withdrawn 1959.

MGWR Cattle Engine F Class GSR J5

Edited by Mayner
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The extended smokebox doors were fitted when the MGWR rebuilt and superheated the Celtic & Connemara Class (GSR D5-7)4-4-0s and B & H Class (GSR J2 & J6) 0-6-0s during the WW1 period. The extending the door allowed the Cusack-Morton supeheater elements to be fitted within an existing smokebox, the cattle engines were built from new with superheaters and did not have this feature.

 

Class D 5 - 548 - M&GWR Class A 4-4-0, built 1904 by Broadstone Works as Midland & Great Western Railway No.126 ATLANTIC - 1925 to GSR as No.548, 1925 rebuilt with Belpaire boiler, 1945 to CIE - with drawn 1955 - seen here near Broadstone - note Pullman car (2nd vehicle) - i of only 3 that ever ran in Ireland.

Rebuilt Celtic MGWR As GSR/CIE D5

 

Class D 6 - 544 - M&GWR Class C1 4-4-0 - built 1915 by Broadstone Works as M&GWR No.11 ERIN-GO-BRAGH - 1925 to GSR as No.544, 1926 rebuilt with Belpaire boiler, 1945 to CIE - withdrawn 1955 - seen here at Kingsbridge.

Rebuilt Connemara MGWR Cs GSR D6/7

 

Class J 5 - 634 - M&GWR Class F 0-6-0, built 1921 by Broadstone Works as M&GWR No.40 - 1925 to GSR as No.634, 1945 to CIE - withdrawn 1959.

MGWR Cattle Engine F Class GSR J5

 

That's them alright..they look so weird

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Interesting pics....

 

The middle one is described on the original caption as being taken at Kingsbridge - I don't think this is right. Looks more like Broadstone to me. Anyone?

 

Spot on JB, the three gable ends are the ones of Great Western Villas/Square, taken looking up toward North Circular Road.

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Interesting pics....

 

The middle one is described on the original caption as being taken at Kingsbridge - I don't think this is right. Looks more like Broadstone to me. Anyone?

 

In the 1st photo 548 has just passed under the North Circular Road on the approaches to Broadstone, the 1st vehicle is a MGWR fish van, second looks like one of the Attock bogie tri-composites, third a Pullman rest of the train probably a mix of GSR/GSWR/MGWR stock.

 

548 was one three Celtic (545 D5) Class 4-4-0s rebuilt in the 1920s with new frames, raised running plates and rounded cabs similar in general styling to the cattle engines.

 

Class D 6 - 544 - M&GWR Class C1 4-4-0 - built 1915 by Broadstone Works as M&GWR No.11 ERIN-GO-BRAGH - 1925 to GSR as No.544, 1926 rebuilt with Belpaire boiler, 1945 to CIE - withdrawn 1955 - seen here at Kingsbridge.

 

In the second photo 544 is on the approaches Broadstone possibly with an up Sligo train with the North Circular Road Bridge in the background, The houses in Great Western Square and Villas and the works on the right.

 

The Connemara MGWR C Class were originally introduced for Sligo & Mayo line services from 1909 onwards,544 is one of 5 locos fitted with large superheated boilers and piston valves from 1917 onwards and classified as GSR Class D6 540-544.

 

The first coach looks like an ex-GSWR Corridor Coach, followed by an ex-MGWR side corridor coach in the lake and cream scheme, followed by a 6 wheeler, a bogie van and a string of non-passenger coaching stock and vans

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The first coach looks like an ex-GSWR Corridor Coach, followed by an ex-MGWR side corridor coach in the lake and cream scheme, followed by a 6 wheeler, a bogie van and a string of non-passenger coaching stock and vans

 

Yes. The first is one of a series built by the GSWR between 1902 and 1905 and is probably an open third. The second is as Mayner says. The next one us a four compartment MGWR six wheeled first, and the far one isn't easy to identify, but the roof profile suggests it's ex GSWR.

 

On livery, the first and third vehicles are in the very dark lake colour - actually, the exact livery on the DCDR No. 836 now. That first vehicle is much the same as 836.

 

The other two are brown and cream. The maroon and cream was only applied to the Drumm trains.

 

GSR coach liveries:

 

1. Dark lake, a la 836, lined gold and rec as on DCDR. Used in all vehicles to 1929 - a continuation of GSWR dark "lake". After 1929, only used on secondary stock including vast majority of 6-wheelers, while main line stock was brown and cream; this until 1933 after which all was lighter LMS-shade maroon.

 

2. Mid brown and cream, lined black. Applied 1929-34 approx to main line stock only. Everything else remained the dark reddish lake colour. The brown was much the same as the GWR shade in England.

 

3. Lighter maroon, lined yellow and black, identical to English LMS, though lettering an entirely different style. Applied to everything from 1933 onwards, though jhb171senior recalled seeing a 6-wheeler at Kingsbridge still in GSWR livery in the thirties...

 

Narrow gauge: darker maroon initially, later post 1933 lighter maroon. No narrow gauge vehicles were ever brown and cream.

 

Drumm trains: their own unique variant: maroon (LMS shade, not the dark lake) and cream, also painted in the LMS shade standard (all over) maroon.

 

By 1940, virtually all the old dark shade and brown/cream vehicles had been repainted standard (lighter) maroon.

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If it's strange looking steamers you're after, don't forget the modified GS&WR prelude to the CC1

Vintage Irish Republic Railways - Steam in Eire - 1954Inchicore works on 24/4/54 with Bulleid's turf burning locomotive taking centre stage. This rebuilt loco had been cobbled together in 1952 using ex-GS&WR K3 2-6-0 as the base and never again saw main line service as it was simply a static test bed. Withdrawal and scrapping finally put her out of her misery in 1957.

 

 

Looking for the unusual steam locos Italy is a good place.

 

 

The Italian Railways seem to have had the most success in getting the Franco-Costi system to work, they also had the even odder habit of building inside cylinder locomotives with the valves and valve gear on the outside https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FS_Class_600#/media/File:Locomotiva_RA_380.jpg

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