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10 Ton GSWR Ballast Brake Plough Van

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First off, if anyone would like any of their photos removed, please contact me or a mod. Reverse searches on the images has proved fruitless, but I believe Enniscorthyman, TTC, Aidan Kehoe, and RedRich may have taken the modern ones. The text is also cobbled together from various sources.

 

Built in 1906, Great Southern and Western Railway procured several of these wagons. They share a very similar outline to the GWR AA3 pattern brake van, it's possible they are related. This is the earliest photo I can find of one behind 355. The small lettering of GSWR can be seen, along with the letters PWD to the right hand side.

 

Untitled-2.jpg

 

These were steel framed from the beginning, even though sister companies like the GNR(I) were knocking out wooden bodied wagons up until the 1940's. The O'Dea Collection has quite a few shots of ballast activity, but not always labelled as such!

 

ballast plough.jpg

 

Ballybrophy with decorative curved canopy on the central platform, similar to that in Mallow.

 

ballast plough1.jpg

 

ballastplluugh.jpg

 

What looks like a mixed rake of GNR and GSWR hoppers, all together in a higgledypiggledy formation.

 

8452 Ballast Plough.jpg

 

At Lisduff is 8452, loading up with ballast. Note the faded flying snail freight stencil on the left hand side.

CA1XUF1J.jpg

 

Into broken circle territory, and what looks like the scrap line in Mullingar, is 8452 again, this time in faded bauxite, and the timber panelling to the sides having been plated over by sheet metal. Panelling on the veranda end still present.

Ballast_Plough004.jpg

 

Unsure of location but somewhere on the DART network, here she is again in yellow. What is mighty about this photos is that the buffers have been upgraded as have dampers and brake gear, but it reveals the original grey livery which they would have worn in the B&W photos above. The last batch of photos show how it was like Triggers sweeping brush, as window openings have been altered, the sides having been padded out so that the vertical stanchions are now hidden, but the timber panelling from beneath is still visible.

 

HPIM2032.jpg

HPIM2035.jpg

HPIM2058.jpg

Picture494-1.jpg

Picture495.jpg

Picture500.jpg

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23247[/ATTACH]

8456.jpg

 

8456 was the last survivor and is believed to have been cut up after 106 years of service (heretics) in 2012. However, 8452 is restored in Downpatrick wearing, as is customary, a fictitious livery and inaccurate stencilling. I've attached a drawing I did of the profile based on photos, which should help anyone scratchbuilding one.

 

8452.pdf

 

R.

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Richie, what number is this one ? have you a high res version ?

 

Ballast_Plough004.jpg

 

I wonder when They went from brown to yellow

 

DO you think the sheet steel was just a thin plating over the wood

 

I think this might be a interesting version to model , a kind of half way house

 

Also notice roller bearings were fitted, as opposed to oil boxes in the CIE photo

 

dave

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First off' date=' if anyone would like any of their photos removed, please contact me or a mod. Reverse searches on the images has proved fruitless, but I believe Enniscorthyman, TTC, Aidan Kehoe, and RedRich may have taken the modern ones. The text is also cobbled together from various sources. Built in 1906, Great Southern and Western Railway procured several of these wagons. They share a very similar outline to the GWR AA3 pattern brake van, it's possible they are related. This is the earliest photo I can find of one behind 355. The small lettering of GSWR can be seen, along with the letters PWD to the right hand side. <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23261"/> These were steel framed from the beginning, even though sister companies like the GNR(I) were knocking out wooden bodied wagons up until the 1940's. The O'Dea Collection has quite a few shots of ballast activity, but not always labelled as such! <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23250"/> Ballybrophy with decorative curved canopy on the central platform, similar to that in Mallow. <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23251"/> <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23253"/> What looks like a mixed rake of GNR and GSWR hoppers, all together in a higgledypiggledy formation. <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23248"/> At Lisduff is 8452, loading up with ballast. Note the faded flying snail freight stencil on the left hand side. <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23254"/> Into broken circle territory, and what looks like the scrap line in Mullingar, is 8452 again, this time in faded bauxite, and the timber panelling to the sides having been plated over by sheet metal. Panelling on the veranda end still present. <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23252"/> Unsure of location but somewhere on the DART network, here she is again in yellow. What is mighty about this photos is that the buffers have been upgraded as have dampers and brake gear, but it reveals the original grey livery which they would have worn in the B&W photos above. The last batch of photos show how it was like Triggers sweeping brush, as window openings have been altered, the sides having been padded out so that the vertical stanchions are now hidden, but the timber panelling from beneath is still visible. <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23255"/> <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23256"/> <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23257"/> <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23258"/> <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23259"/> <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23260"/> <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23247"/> <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23249"/> 8456 was the last survivor and is believed to have been cut up after 106 years of service (heretics) in 2012. However, 8452 is restored in Downpatrick wearing, as is customary, a fictitious livery and inaccurate stencilling. I've attached a drawing I did of the profile based on photos, which should help anyone scratchbuilding one. <img src="http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23262"/> R.[/quote']

 

Richie,You have my permission to use the photos that I have taken-and thank you for asking.

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Superb article, Glenderg!.

 

Cheers JB, that means a lot :)

 

Richie, what number is this one ? have you a high res version ?

 

I wonder when They went from brown to yellow

 

DO you think the sheet steel was just a thin plating over the wood

 

No idea of the running number and that's as high res as they get. There were only four 8452 - 8456.

 

No idea when the change happened. Early seventies? NLI have photos of tampers in 1966 in yellow. I have a colour Joe St. Leger one showing it in brown, but the collection has been taken off Flickr so I can't tell what date it is :(

 

The sheet metal was between 6 - 8mm thick as it the same thickness as the stanchions.

 

Now THAT's a photo collection. Great resource for putting together a model / etch (cough) of one....

 

To quote Gaff in Bladerunner.."You've done a man's job sir!"

 

Cheer's Des - no excuse now but there's no donor chassis unfortunately :(

 

Richie,You have my permission to use the photos that I have taken-and thank you for asking.

 

I had a feeling they came from your goodself. They are a remarkable record of those wagons, as rare as hen's teeth. Many thanks. R.

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As for changes in colours, I'm not sure when they went from brown to yellow. I would guess - but it's only a guess - maybe mid to late 1980s. Early 90s at most.

 

The change from grey to brown would have happened in the mid 70s. Naturally, prior to CIE they we also grey in GSR days, and the later GSWR days a darker grey. They may have been black when built new, as most GSWR goods and PW stock was then.

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As for changes in colours, I'm not sure when they went from brown to yellow. I would guess - but it's only a guess - maybe mid to late 1980s. Early 90s at most.

 

There are pics knocking around of yellow ballast ploughs with CIE roundels, so I'd say it would've happened in the early '80s at the latest, JB...

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It's possible, Garfield. If such a thing appeared even as late as 1986, it would still have a roundel if painted yellow.

 

Certainly, when I saw ballast trains in the late 70s, yellow was nowhere to be seen, so it's been some time in the 80s. Maybe someone else might know exactly, for the assistance of those modellers seeking accuracy for their chosen period?

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JB might be the man to ask , if I was building a gswr plough for a late seventies early eighties layout , would it be in bauxite brown or yellow

 

These are weighty questions us railway modellers have to deal with

 

Opps I see JB has answered.

 

The key to this question of yellow is of course a dated picture from the seventies

 

I think it's clear however that new series of 4 ploughs built in 1977 was always yellow. The issue is when the gswr versions were so converted to that colour

Edited by Junctionmad
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JM,

 

Page 67 of Hirsch and Doyle first edition has a black and white of 8452, with the same vertical white stripe as the bauxite mullingar photo. Since it's 1979, one can assume the photo was taken no later than that.

 

So 1979 = Bauxite

 

After that? well, time to trawl the books now, I've exhausted the internet.

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The key to this question of yellow is of course a dated picture from the seventies

 

I think it's clear however that new series of 4 ploughs built in 1977 was always yellow. The issue is when the gswr versions were so converted to that colour

 

Absolutely. The 1977 new ones were, as far as I remember, the first PW vehicles (other than tampers, liners and general "yellow machines") ever to be yellow.

 

If you're modelling a GSWR one around 1979/80, I'd go for all over brown.

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Courtesy of a certain mister Mayne...out of stock at the mo

..

 

Possibly my fault. I beg forgiveness.

 

Anyway, after trawling all my books and the ENTIRE digital photo library here at glenderg towers, the date issue of bauxite/yellow was in front of me all the time, and JHB has the answer. He posted this recently.

 

Ballast Plough 8452.jpg

 

JB might just have a look at the back and see if there's a date, I can't locate the thread.

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