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Non standard bits in your tool box

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snapper
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So we all probably have most of the standard bits like files, hobby knife, snips ect. in our modelling tool box. But have you got any thing extra in your box that you find useful.

 

I saw a video with a guy using a toothpick to make sure that two holes line up.

I have a small locking pliers that makes for a good clamp when you put some rubber over the ends.

Some high percentage isopropyl alcohol for cleaning (be careful of the fumes)

 

Anybody else got some more?

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Snapper I use adhesive or strong double sided tape to put all the different grades of wet and dry on ice lolly sticks. You get loads for your money, a nice little file like tool, and I have an indispensable amount that will last me a modelling lifetime. Simple and easy to make and they are great tool's. This one has definitely seen better days.

 

 

 

Rich,

DSC01208.jpg

DSC01208.jpg

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Snapper I use adhesive or strong double sided tape to put all the different grades of wet and dry on ice lolly sticks. You get loads for your money, a nice little file like tool, and I have an indispensable amount that will last me a modelling lifetime. Simple and easy to make and they are great tool's. This one has definitely seen better days.

 

 

I buy cheap emery boards (the ones for doing your nails!) from the local Euro shop. The get about 30 in various sizes and grades for 2 Euro.

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01 - Paintin and decorating shops have sandpaper sponges in a variety of grades, cut into 1inch squares are great for sanding curved roof profiles and tricky curves.

02 - hypodermic needles - great for applying glues,, plastic magic and poly cement.

03 - cocktail sticks - multiple uses, great for adjusting small items.

04 - solid aluminium calipers - lock to a size, great for scribing opes.

05 - rusty rulers from car boot sales. If they're still on the go they're good.

06 - bottle opener - bloody useless for modelling, excellent for opening a well earned beer.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Dont know what it is or where it came from but its the best yoke I ever had to clean metal wheels

Brass wire or something similar

 

I presume that we've all seen the Peco wheel cleaner that, with the addition of two croc clips, can clean the wheels, whilst they are rotating, by means of a scraper and a wire brush that are powered from the track?

9_280806_440000000.jpg

9_280806_440000000.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Garryson 'Garryflex' abrasive-filled rubber blocks.

 

 

 

Similar to track rubbers, of course, but much larger and in various, colour-coded, grades and capable of producing a beautiful, almost polished, finish. I've had mine for over thirty years and I doubt they're even 10% worn yet..

 

Hard to find, but well worth looking for.

059831813457b64e3f0ceeb86cf55fac.jpg

059831813457b64e3f0ceeb86cf55fac.jpg

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"Garryflex?" Sounds like a rip off of "Stretch Armstrong";)

 

:tumbsup: Good stuff, though - well worth getting the full set, although the medium (grey) gets the most use.

 

I'm also a fan of the Swann-Morton Retractaway scalpel.

 

 

 

The blades stay sharp longer, as they're not jangling about - and you don't find out how sharp they are when rooting in the toolbox..!

 

You can fit most of the blades in, though the 'hook' one won't fit, and then etch the shape on the handle so that you can find the right one easily.

Swann_Morton_Retractaway_1_LG.jpg

Swann_Morton_Retractaway_1_LG.jpg

Edited by Broithe
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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
:tumbsup: Good stuff, though - well worth getting the full set, although the medium (grey) gets the most use.

 

I'm also a fan of the Swann-Morton Retractaway scalpel.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]1804[/ATTACH]

 

The blades stay sharp longer, as they're not jangling about - and you don't find out how sharp they are when rooting in the toolbox..!

 

You can fit most of the blades in, though the 'hook' one won't fit, and then etch the shape on the handle so that you can find the right one easily.

 

I bought one of these on ebay, the handle is very sturdy but I think the key to this is the blades. They seem to be much better and sharper than anything I have ever gotten in a model shop. Not bad for € 10 for a handle and ten blades

http://www.ebay.ie/itm/310392956414?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649

http://www.ebay.ie/itm/310363218803?var=610046047936&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649

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I bought one of these on ebay, the handle is very sturdy but I think the key to this is the blades. They seem to be much better and sharper than anything I have ever gotten in a model shop. Not bad for € 10 for a handle and ten blades
They are seriously sharp - the risk of a dramatic cut should not be underestimated - it's worth developing the habit of retracting the blade during even the shortest period out of use.

 

A few plasters kept in the toolbox might get used over time....

 

Also, if you ever do manage to snap a blade, you'll find that they fly off at some speed. I've only ever done it once, but it made me glad to be wearing glasses.

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The traditional handles are great, especially if you're using them at home, but, if they're going to get rattled round in a travelling toolbox, then the retractable ones will stay sharp much longer - and it's a lot safer rummaging round if the blades aren't exposed.

 

If you speak nicely to a nurse, they might be persuaded to let you have some stitch cutters - they can be useful in awkward places.

 

 

 

There is also the Veritas scalpel handle, which uses a collet arrangement that will take most of the various blade fittings. The cap in the handle has a strong magnet and will hold around six blades of various shapes.

 

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Stitch-Cutter-Blade.jpg

05k7301s2.jpg

Stitch-Cutter-Blade.jpg

Edited by Broithe
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The sharper the blade the safer it is - requires less effort to cut materials (so your not applying too much pressure and it jumps) and if you do manage to cut yourself it will be a cleaner cut, not gouged and less chance of infection

 

Some very good advice and I have the scars to prove it.

 

Rich,

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The traditional handles are great, especially if you're using them at home, but, if they're going to get rattled round in a travelling toolbox, then the retractable ones will stay sharp much longer - and it's a lot safer rummaging round if the blades aren't exposed.

 

If you speak nicely to a nurse, they might be persuaded to let you have some stitch cutters - they can be useful in awkward places.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]2577[/ATTACH]

 

There is also the Veritas scalpel handle, which uses a collet arrangement that will take most of the various blade fittings. The cap in the handle has a strong magnet and will hold around six blades of various shapes.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]2578[/ATTACH]

 

Thanks for that Jim as it has answered some questions for me.

 

Rich,

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