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hexagon789

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(Had a search on this site, but I could only find an existing thread on livery nicknames, not class nicknames.)

 

I've heard a few but wondered if anyone could add to the following -

121 Class - Yanks

141/181 Class - Small/Baby GMs

071 Class - Big GMs

201 Class - River Class

22000 Class - ICRs

 

Does anyone know of any other nicknames for the above or for other classes?

 

Regards, Ben.

 

 

 

 

Edited by hexagon789
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The NCC U2 class 4.4.0s were the “Scotch Engines” because they were built there.

The IE 2600 class railcars were “Fanta Cans” when new due to being mostly orange.

The NIR 80 class were only latterly called “thumpers” by young enthusiasts. They were never known as such by railway staff or when in most of their life in traffic.

I remember in UTA days hearing of the AEC & BUT railcars, as opposed to anything and everything on the NCC, collectively as “Great Northern Railcars”....

Edited by jhb171achill
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4 hours ago, josefstadt said:

2700 class railcars 'Sparrows' (Spanish Arrows).

 

Presumably because 2600s were known as "Arrow Commuter"?

3 hours ago, Lambeg man said:

"SPUTNICKS" for UTA built MPD Railcars and obviously "JEEPS" for the WT class 2-6-4T's. "MOGULS" for the tender version (W class) and "WHIPPETS" for a class/type of small boilered NCC 4-4-0's. Finally, "BLUEBIRDS" for the GNR(I) V class 4-4-0's.

 

I kind of like the sound of "Sputniks"! 😂

3 hours ago, Railer said:

NIR 80 class were know as thumpers due to their sound. The NIR 450s were known as the Castle class due to their names.

 

Am I right in thinking the 70 Class were the "River" Class?

 

2 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

The NIR 80 class were only latterly called “thumpers” by young enthusiasts. They were never known as such by railway staff or when in most of their life in traffic.

 

Presumably brought over from the BR Southern Region?

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44 minutes ago, hexagon789 said:

 

Presumably because 2600s were known as "Arrow Commuter"?

yes

 

 

Am I right in thinking the 70 Class were the "River" Class?

Yes

 

 

Presumably brought over from the BR Southern Region?

exactly!     ..... but by youthful enthusiasts who might realise that the Southern Region is "narrow gauge"!

 

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1 hour ago, Galteemore said:

70 class also known as Hampshire units I recall? I also remember the C class diesels being called Metrovicks 

The NIR “C” class we’re officially designated MV class.

The 70s were called “Rivers” by perhaps a handful of enthusiasts, but as for “Hampshires”; I knew one enthusiast who occasionally called then that! (You may know who I mean!)....

In Britain the Southern Region ones as opposed to our ones, were called Hampshires.

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New one to me, Lambegman, but there ye go! Wouldn't have been common, I suspect. And, like you, I never heard the other yokes called "Rivers".

Railwaymen all over tended to refer to numbers in most but not all cases. The three Hunslets were known as Hunslets or 101s, the railcars were inevitable 70 or 80 class among railwaymen, but the 450s were also called "Castles". The MED, MPD, BUT and AEC cars were called just that. On CIE, railwaymen almost inevitably used the GSWR terminology, not GSR - thus a 101 class instead of a J15, a 400 class, 500 class, 800 class, 60 class etc etc...

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15 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

In Britain the Southern Region ones as opposed to our ones, were called Hampshires.

I believe only the Class 205s, as under the Southern Region designation they were 2H or 3H - 2-car Hampshire etc

 

11 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

New one to me, Lambegman, but there ye go! Wouldn't have been common, I suspect. And, like you, I never heard the other yokes called "Rivers".

Railwaymen all over tended to refer to numbers in most but not all cases. The three Hunslets were known as Hunslets or 101s, the railcars were inevitable 70 or 80 class among railwaymen, but the 450s were also called "Castles". The MED, MPD, BUT and AEC cars were called just that. On CIE, railwaymen almost inevitably used the GSWR terminology, not GSR - thus a 101 class instead of a J15, a 400 class, 500 class, 800 class, 60 class etc etc...

So most nicknames tended to be enthusiast created then?

 

 

Does anyone know of any other nicknames for any of 121/141/181/071 or 201 Class locos?

Or any modern IE DMUs/EMUs.

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25 minutes ago, hexagon789 said:

I believe only the Class 205s, as under the Southern Region designation they were 2H or 3H - 2-car Hampshire etc

 

So most nicknames tended to be enthusiast created then?

 

 

Does anyone know of any other nicknames for any of 121/141/181/071 or 201 Class locos?

Or any modern IE DMUs/EMUs.

Not necessarily most, but I would say probably. Railway staff were responsible for many too, e.g. “Jeeps” for the NCC / UTA “WT” class 2.6.4Ts.

The GSR renumbered one of the Midland G2 2.4.0s as No. 666. The railwaymen called it “The Beast” after the passage in the Book of Revelations in the Bible which speaks of the end of the world, and the “number of the beast” is apparently “calculated” as three sixes. Some drivers considered it bad luck to drive it.

In modern times, the 2600 railcars were “Fanta Cans” initially, then to a few they were “Lilt Cans” when repainted navy and lime green. Which probably makes them “Diet 7-Up Cans” nowadays!

When new, I heard the 201 class locos referred to as something to do with yellow, or bananas (flying banana, maybe?) on account of the yellow stripe on the side and the yellow ends....

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5 hours ago, hexagon789 said:

Does anyone know of any other nicknames for any of 121/141/181/071 or 201 Class locos?

In the late 80's when you are standing on a miserable wet platform at stupid o' clock, and the station master announces the loco has failed, you can imagine the inventive names bandied about!!

For interest, it appeared to be the A class featuring more frequently in these announcements.

 

Ken

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7 hours ago, Galteemore said:

Have also heard the WT class referred to as Mogul Tanks. And of course SG3s as Big Ds.

Spot on, David, while the Class WT was called a "Jeep" by one of the shed foremen because of their go-anywhere, do anything nature; the name was not commonly used by railway staff.

In the 1960s when I began timing trains (and travelling with your esteemed Dad), we always referred to the WTs as simply "Tanks" or the longer "Mogul Tank" - for that is what they were - a tank version of the LMSNCC 1932-built Moguls. 

Of course there was another very numerous class of tank (only a few by 1960) on the GNR(I), but they were usually referred to by enthusiasts, at least,  as "Glover Tanks", after the CME who introduced them.

I never heard of the GNR Class V being called anything but "the Compounds" either in speech or in the literature, nor had I heard of the LQGs being called anything but "LQGs". The SG3s, thanks to their prodigious power most certainly were always referred to as "Big Ds".

The ENGLISH often erroneously) refer to the 800s as "Queens" but my understanding of Irish history is that they ladies honoured were simply ladies in Irish history, or mythology.

I won't go on about "Whippets", "Woolwich's" (again Anglice "Woolworths"), Kerry Bogies (Jon Beaumont will tell you?), "Cattle Engines"; "Bandon Tanks" (self-explanatory); "Scotch Engines" .........

Now the diseasels - known by enthusiasts as "Bullets" because of the silvery livery. To this day, you occasionally hear an older enthusiast say that there is a Bullet on the front!

Sorry, Jon, but "Lambeg Man" is right about the Class 70s - I remember them often being referred to as "Hampshire Units".

The fun we had?

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Class J5 - 629 - MGWR Class Fa 0-6-0 - built 1924 by Broadstone Works as MGWR No.92 - 1925 to GSR as Class 623 No.629, 1945 to CIE - 1954 withdrawn.

The large wheeled MGWR F/GSR 623/J5 were known as the "Cattle Engines" the first true mixed traffic engine they worked cattle trains from the great fairs on the Midland system, and sometimes Night Mails and excursion traffic.

Class J 3 - 212 - GS&WR Class 211 0-6-0, built 1903 by North British Loco Co. as 0-6-2T - 1907 rebuilt as 0-6-0 - 1925 to GSR, 1945 to CIE - withdrawn 1951.

Rebuilt from a large GSWR 0-6-2T banking loco. A Waterford loco apparently nicknamed the "Reverend Mother" with those small wheels she would not run fast no-matter how wide the driver opened the regulator.

Class J13 - JUMBO - GS&WR Class 201 0-6-4WT, built by Inchicore Works in 1876 as GW&WR No.202 - 1883 side tanks added, 1896 rebuilt as 0-6-0T, number emoved and named JUMBO, 1945 to CIE - withdrawn 1957 - seen here at Waterford in 1955.

 

Jumbo Waterford's Goods Yard and Dock Pilot rebuilt from an 0-6-4 back Tank in 1896.

A very popular loco supposed to have been a city institution.

Class D 5 - 548 - M&GWR Class A 4-4-0, built 1904 by Broadstone Works as Midland & Great Western Railway No.126 ATLANTIC - 1925 to GSR as No.548, 1925 rebuilt with Belpaire boiler, 1945 to CIE - with drawn 1955 - seen here near Broadstone - note Pullman car (2nd vehicle) - 1 of only 3 that ever ran in Ireland.

MGWR As GSR 545 "Celtic Class" 4-4-0 most powerful MGWR passenger class largest Irish 4-4-0 when introduced in 1902.

Ended up on cattle trains bumped from Midland Section main line passenger services with the introduction of the Woolwich moguls, to heavy to be used on South Eastern section.

Class D 6 - 544 - M&GWR Class C1 4-4-0 - built 1915 by Broadstone Works as M&GWR No.11 ERIN-GO-BRAGH - 1925 to GSR as No.544, 1926 rebuilt with Belpaire boiler, 1945 to CIE - withdrawn 1955 - seen here at Kingsbridge.

MGWR C/ GSR 536&540  "Connemera" or "Kylemore" Class 4-4-0

Introduced for use on Mayo & Sligo lines 1910 onwards later rebuilt with large superheated boilers.

Used mainly on slower Midland Passenger and Cattle trains. Not the most successrful design with a reputation of rough riding and heavy on coal, though seem to have preformed well on Dublin-Limerick via Nenagh trains in the 1930s!

 

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56 minutes ago, leslie10646 said:

nor had I heard of the LQGs being called anything but "LQGs"

Hi Leslie,

Page 93 of Irish Railways in the 1950's and 1960's (by Kevin McCormack) shows LQG No. 164 with a 'D' power classification plate on the cab side. I think Laurence Liddle mentions them being referred to as "Big D's" either in his book or one in of his 5' 3" articles.

 

Excellent photographs Mayner

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38 minutes ago, Lambeg man said:

 

Page 93 of Irish Railways in the 1950's and 1960's (by Kevin McCormack) shows LQG No. 164 with a 'D' power classification plate on the cab side. I think Laurence Liddle mentions them being referred to as "Big D's" ...................

Correct!

And then there were the MGWR / GSR "Woolwiches" and NCC "Scotch Engines" - both named by railway staff. Somehow, I seem to take railway staff nicknames more seriously than those given by teenage gricers! 😁

The D16s were known as the "Achill Bogies" as the six of them ended up there, rarely doing anything else as they were very underpowered.

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1 hour ago, leslie10646 said:

The ENGLISH (often erroneously) refer to the 800s as "Queens" but my understanding of Irish history is that they ladies honoured were simply ladies in Irish history, or mythology.

......... Kerry Bogies (Jon Beaumont will tell you?), "Cattle Engines"; "Bandon Tanks" (self-explanatory)

Sorry, Jon, but "Lambeg Man" is right about the Class 70s - I remember them often being referred to as "Hampshire Units".

 

Sure what would the English know! 🤣

Yes, while "Maedb" was a queen, Macha & Tailté weren't! Had another two been built, they would have been named after non-queen personalities too. 

The "Kerry Bogies" were usually to be found on Mallow - Tralee, hence the name. I think they were Ireland's first 4.4.0s, certainly among them.

Not disputing the Hampshire label - just I never heard it despite living in Lisburn.

Forgot about the "Bandon Tanks". Pity one didn't survive, though with its coal capacity it would be useless in main line use. But good in a museum, provided they could be bothered to paint it correctly. They'd probably have it in maroon and tartan, with a yellow chimney........

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12 hours ago, Mayner said:

 

Class D 6 - 544 - M&GWR Class C1 4-4-0 - built 1915 by Broadstone Works as M&GWR No.11 ERIN-GO-BRAGH - 1925 to GSR as No.544, 1926 rebuilt with Belpaire boiler, 1945 to CIE - withdrawn 1955 - seen here at Kingsbridge.

 

Interesting train, illustrating perfectly the point that I make elsewhere quite often - that in the pre-1970 times going way back, in both goods and passenger trains barely two consecutive vehicles were alike.

Behind the loco - a non-corridor third of approx 1900-05 era, either GSWR or possibly DSER in origin in GSR maroon; a brown and cream MGWR composite (prob 1st / 2nd);  a maroon MGWR six-wheeled third; a brown and cream GSWR third by the look of it, and various horse boxes and fitted vans.

The GSR initially used the same extremely dark browny maroon known as "crimson lake" (though it was about as crimson as an apple!) as per GSWR, just different markings. The brown and cream, same shades as the English GWR, starts appearing in the late 1920s but is confined to main line stock. From 1933, LMS shade maroon (with identical lining, as seen in the first coach) becomes the norm for the rest of GSR days. The loco, of course, is all-over dark grey.

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Heard the 70 class decsribed as Hampshires when I was younger on a regular basis as they were based upon EE Hampshire DMUs built a few years earlier for the Southern Region. On later NIR days the 450 class also became known as the Cattle class by long suffering passengers on the Derry line in particular!

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On 4/26/2019 at 6:37 PM, KMCE said:

In the late 80's when you are standing on a miserable wet platform at stupid o' clock, and the station master announces the loco has failed, you can imagine the inventive names bandied about!!

For interest, it appeared to be the A class featuring more frequently in these announcements.

 

Ken

 

I can well imagine staff coming up with some very colourful names indeed! 😉

 

On 4/26/2019 at 1:56 PM, jhb171achill said:

Not necessarily most, but I would say probably. Railway staff were responsible for many too, e.g. “Jeeps” for the NCC / UTA “WT” class 2.6.4Ts.

The GSR renumbered one of the Midland G2 2.4.0s as No. 666. The railwaymen called it “The Beast” after the passage in the Book of Revelations in the Bible which speaks of the end of the world, and the “number of the beast” is apparently “calculated” as three sixes. Some drivers considered it bad luck to drive it.

In modern times, the 2600 railcars were “Fanta Cans” initially, then to a few they were “Lilt Cans” when repainted navy and lime green. Which probably makes them “Diet 7-Up Cans” nowadays!

When new, I heard the 201 class locos referred to as something to do with yellow, or bananas (flying banana, maybe?) on account of the yellow stripe on the side and the yellow ends....

 

I've since come across "bricks" for the 201s.

 

On 5/1/2019 at 3:13 PM, airfixfan said:

Heard the 70 class decsribed as Hampshires when I was younger on a regular basis as they were based upon EE Hampshire DMUs built a few years earlier for the Southern Region. On later NIR days the 450 class also became known as the Cattle class by long suffering passengers on the Derry line in particular!

 

A new one I came upon describing the then brand-new NIR 450s - 66,000cc shopping trolleys! 😂😂😂

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