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minister_for_hardship

What is the convention of calling a station "X Junction?" Or is there any?

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Former and current junction stations never getting the suffix Junction; Mallow, Banteer, Streamstown, Gortatlea, Roscrea, Sallins, etc. was there criteria for being called Junction or just historical accident or local or official preference?

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Just received a copy of E L Ahrons’ wonderful ‘Locomotive and Train Working in the Nineteeth Century’ Vol 6 - Ireland, which I think is a must have for @Angus, @David Holman @2996 Victor if not on their shelves already. Ahrons describes Limerick Junction as ‘ a fairly large and commodious railway station situated in space....typically Irish’. The book itself is a wonderful description of the main services on Irish railways in the later years of the century - and for some time after....

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1 hour ago, minister_for_hardship said:

Former and current junction stations never getting the suffix Junction; Mallow, Banteer, Streamstown, Gortatlea, Roscrea, Sallins, etc. was there criteria for being called Junction or just historical accident or local or official preference?

I suspect that much may have had to do with whether there was a settlement there already worthy of a station in its own right. Certainly, in the north, places like Ballyclare Junction, Cookstown Junction, Fintona Junction, Limavady Junction, and Bundoran Junction are in the middle of nowhere. The importance  and size of the ‘branch’ terminus may also have been a factor in the name. 

Edited by Galteemore

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Limerick Junction station is at a nowhere location, not even in Limerick city. Nobody lives there, there is no town, no industury, and it's only been half a station anyway most of its history as if eaten by piraña fish until last year when it became a proper main line station with a platform on each side of the main lines. Symmetry and common sense finally prevailed instead of that utterly daft scissors and the old time table. 20 years ago one used to change by leaving the comfort and silence of City Gold mk3 coaches to board the cold rusty rattle can Bangladesh express shuttle to Limerick.

Edited by Noel

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I presume that you still can't actually buy a ticket to Manulla Junction?

You're not meant to leave the station, merely to use it as a 'transfer point' for Westport or Ballina.

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Thanks Galteemore,

I've just been searching for the volume in question, it might be heresy but I've always been put off by locomotive preformance writing. O.S Nock seems to drone on in most of his books in quite a turgid manner on this.

I'll give Ahrons a try having discovered him the author of the phrase "better a dead mackerel on the North Western than a first class passenger on the Brighton line"  his narrative should be more entertaining!

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Oh it is, Angus! I won’t spoil it by giving away too much but an excess of rhubarb wine on the platform at Athlone features ...Ossie Nock it ain’t! It’s more about how the lines were worked than anything else. The locomotive performance is well —and engagingly - addressed by Donaldson, McDonnell etc in ‘ A Decade of Steam on CIE’. Here’s a sample of his style re the English GNR...

14878539-BF66-4234-8044-3A487EF74EA7.jpeg

Edited by Galteemore
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On 5/22/2020 at 1:18 PM, Galteemore said:

I suspect that much may have had to do with whether there was a settlement there already worthy of a station in its own right. Certainly, in the north, places like Ballyclare Junction, Cookstown Junction, Fintona Junction, Limavady Junction, and Bundoran Junction are in the middle of nowhere. The importance  and size of the ‘branch’ terminus may also have been a factor in the name. 

Oddball ones were Inny Junction/Liffey Junction after rivers. Nesbitt Junction is the only one I'm aware of here named after a person.

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7 minutes ago, Galteemore said:

Apart perhaps from ‘Newcomen Junction’ ? 

Named after Newcomen Bridge, wasn't it? Not directly after Newcomen. Nesbitt Junction specifically named after a landowner, Miss Downey Nesbitt who largely paid for the Edenderry branch.

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3 hours ago, Galteemore said:

Just received a copy of E L Ahrons’ wonderful ‘Locomotive and Train Working in the Nineteeth Century’ Vol 6 - Ireland, which I think is a must have for @Angus, @David Holman @2996 Victor if not on their shelves already. Ahrons describes Limerick Junction as ‘ a fairly large and commodious railway station situated in space....typically Irish’. The book itself is a wonderful description of the main services on Irish railways in the later years of the century - and for some time after....

Thanks @Galteemore, I'll be looking for a copy as well!

Kind regards,

Mark

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6 hours ago, Galteemore said:

Just received a copy of E L Ahrons’ wonderful ‘Locomotive and Train Working in the Nineteeth Century’ Vol 6 - Ireland, which I think is a must have for @Angus, @David Holman @2996 Victor if not on their shelves already. Ahrons describes Limerick Junction as ‘ a fairly large and commodious railway station situated in space....typically Irish’. The book itself is a wonderful description of the main services on Irish railways in the later years of the century - and for some time after....

I've ordered a copy from Martin Bott, one of my favoured booksellers - always worth a look for anything you need. Looking forward to its arrival!

E L was Ernest Leopold, apparently!

Kind regards,

Mark

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On 5/23/2020 at 3:29 PM, Galteemore said:

Just received a copy of E L Ahrons’ wonderful ‘Locomotive and Train Working in the Nineteeth Century’ Vol 6 - Ireland, which I think is a must have for @Angus, @David Holman @2996 Victor if not on their shelves already. Ahrons describes Limerick Junction as ‘ a fairly large and commodious railway station situated in space....typically Irish’. The book itself is a wonderful description of the main services on Irish railways in the later years of the century - and for some time after....

I think “typical” is the least appropriate word I’ve ever heard to describe Limerick Junction!

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