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warb

barrow street

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Laser cut? Be interesting to read more about how you do this, given that (whatever the method), windows are very time consuming and hard to get consistent. These look the business!

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As previously mentioned prior to Autocad/laser cutter the only way of making windows was drawing them with a pencil and cutting them out with a scalpel.Time moved on and i got access to AutoCad which greatly improved the situation for drawing the windows consistently for cutting out by hand which still took forever. Due to the amount of windows on Barrow Street I was able to acquire a laser cutter which speeds up the time of cutting and with greater precision . The time to produce a set of windows has moved from  cutting by hand with a scalpel to the time spent drawing with Autocad and how to proceed. Over time you learn that most item we want to produce for your layout is made up of layers and windows are the same and most windows are either two or three layer per window especially for up and down sash windows in older buildings. I have attached the drawings of how windows are drawn in three layers for the makeup of the different type of window(see below) which are drawn in two different colours for the laser cutter. i.e green for the first cut and purple for the last cut.Normally when I start i measure the overall width and height of all the openings and due to small differences with hand cut window opes in the buildings I average the size for each type of window to be made and then proceed to drawing. All the windows on Barrow Street are cut from 320gsm straight cut folders inserts for filing cabinets which are a good quality and the different layers are glued together with 3M spray mount adhesive and when completed are painted and then fitted with 1mm perspex glazing with spray mount.Below I have attached the makeup of two types of windows as set out above and the finnish photos of the finished article. I hope this helps.

regards

warb

 

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Loving the work Warb. I'm applying a similar process for making my windows. I use autocad to design with and then use .25mm plastic sheet cut with a diecutter built up in layers.

I'm always interested in new techniques and was wondering how much a laser cutter similar to yours would cost and would it cut styrene sharply or would it melt?

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Scahalane

The cutting of styrene on a laser cutter should not be done because of the toxic fumes and possible damage it may do overtime. The unit i have access to is at the expensive end and is a industrial unit and the other problem is the temp that it cuts at. there is no problem cutting acrylics.

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There's no arsenic in polystyrene and burning it properly at high temperatures is relatively safe..

..but in a 'domestic' situation, it would produce styrene* gas, which will attack your nervous system directly and is definitely worth avoiding.

Styrene, like a lot of benzene derivatives, is (possibly) carcinogenic, but definitely toxic.

When polymerised into polystyrene and used at 'normal' temperatures, it's probably OK - unless you plan on living for a 1,000 years, something else almost certainly will get you first.

Even warming stuff up in the microwave when it's in a Styrofoam container might be best avoided.

 

* It's what the 'burning plastic' smell is.

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Fascinating. Thanks Warb.

The latest edition of the Gauge 0 Gazette contains an article on laser cutting, which backs up what has been said already. However, a few things not mentioned include:

  • The author uses a 35 watt CO2 laser, which is water cooled so in addition needs a tank of water and a pump to circulate it. You can buy one for about £2000, plus VAT, but derivatives can be found on Ebay for about £400, apparently
  • The laser tube lasts about 1000 hours and costs £250 to replace
  • Materials that work well with a laser cutter include cardboard, Perspex [acrylic sheet], but NOT styrene/plasticard. Mylar [polyester sheet] cuts well, but can be difficult to glue. MDF and plywood both work well, which is why there are a fair few commercial laser cut kits available now.

 However, as Warb says and very much along the same lines as 3D printing, first you need to know CAD, which takes time and effort to perfect. Clearly worth it, when you need the amount he is using!

 The alternatives include contacting the likes of York Model Rail, who produce a wide range of laser cut windows, doors etc and who will do custom jobs too. Schools and colleges may have laser cutting equipment that you might be able to access, while the author of the Guild article, Bob Gledhill has written a book on the subject. Laser Cutting and 3D Printing for Railway Modeller; published by Conwood Press ISBN 978 78500 226 7

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 It may be easier to find a CNC Profile Cutting business rather than jumping in at the deep end with buying a laser profile cutter.

Businesses that carry out laser or water jet profile cutting for industry may be prepared to take on one off and low volume work for individuals, a company like York Modelrail https://www.yorkmodelrail.com/ is probably the best bet option for an in-experienced designer.

http://www.cnclasercutting.ie/materials/

http://cirruslaser.co.uk/cutting-services

Members of our local Large Scale modelling group have had plasticard coach sides cut using water jet cutting for approx $20 for a pair of sides and have also used water jet cutting rather than CNC milling for profile cutting parts in metal for large scale locos.

CAD takes time to master AutoCAD or SolidWorks are professional level programmes which is reflected in their pricing, Draftsight is a more reasonably priced option for 2D drafting for the casual designer, while Sketchup is widely used for 3D modelling by amateurs and professionals alike.

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Some of the windows completed and fitted to island villa

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As with the thread roundhouses in ireland here are photos of the same location on barrow street under construction

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To close off this weekends work some doors/curtains/blinds fitted

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Anybody got a drone to check if the dodgy slates are in the right places?    🤨

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22 minutes ago, Broithe said:

Anybody got a drone to check if the dodgy slates are in the right places?    🤨

Strange but true, I used a drone to check our roof last winter after a big storm, and found two damaged slates.

btw, fab buildings as ever on barrow street  👍

 

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island villa ready for installation on barrow street

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Signals installed and working on barrow street

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25 minutes ago, 201bhoy said:

Unreal!!!!!!!

But, somehow, much more than real...

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forgive the quality of the photos as i am only using a ancient fuji camera

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1 hour ago, warb said:

forgive the quality of the photos as i am only using a ancient fuji camera

No Hail Marys will be required for your full absolution, my son.:bishopbrennan:

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Update of buildings on barrow street. 

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Words fail. So real and reeks of atmosphere. You should be the new set designer for LucasFilm or ION productions next Bond movie. You could out do Ken Adam's famous sets.

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the 23rd leaf on the right hand tree, is it outta place, ;)

love the gable end weathering

me thinks 200 pigeons on a white stained roof would fit perfect

then i asks me self would he dare graffiti the walls?

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Photos of grand canal quay/boston sidings in progress

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