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For next winter I've been pondering the idea of doing a smaller portable layout loosely based on Gort station around 1970.  Rough track diagram below which has already been highly compressed but still requires nearly 8ft on two 18" x 4' base boards joined end to end.

gort01_diagram.jpg

Snippet from OSI map

gort_station_osi_track_plan.jpg

There is a fabulous photo of the station on page 29 of "Rails Through The West" from around 1970 showing a hive of goods traffic activity for what was a busy market town. Link below to photo on Ciaran Cooney's album eiretrains.com 

http://eiretrains.com/Photo_Gallery/Railway Stations G/Gort/IrishRailwayStations.html#Gort_20101216_004_CC_JA.jpg

I've been studying as many online photos as possible get a handle on the changes over the years. One of the bizarre things is it seems (unless my eyes are deceiving me) is that the water tower was dismantled and rebuilt stone by stone further back from its original position when the railway line reopened to make way for the new longer platforms. If anybody can point me to more online photos of the track layout circa 1960s and 1970s I would very much appreciate it. If I do go ahead with this I plan to use Peco code 75 flat bottom rail and electrofrog points.

 

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Noel, its a promising looking arrangement and you have captured the design well. You may have to start soon though because the Irish winter is here!

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Posted (edited)

The water tower was moved during the renovation, possibly due to a preservation order.

This document include some great information for you,

Page 1 has scale drawings before the reopening

page 12 has detailed drawings of the signal box

Page 13 has a great set of drawings for anybody modelling a modern IE footbridge

http://gccapps.galwaycoco.ie/viewexternaldocuments/ViewPDF?ref=1387517

http://www.eplanning.ie/GalwayCC/AppFileRefDetails/08443/0

Galway Co Co Planning reference 08443

There is more information in the other planning applications but the one linked seems to be the best

The O'Dea Collection has one picture from 1969 http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000307634

And I came across this one on flickr but the entire album is worth looking at 

Ireland Gort station Galway 7th April 1977

 

 

Edited by snapper
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2 hours ago, snapper said:

The water tower was moved during the renovation, possibly due to a preservation order.

This document include some great information for you,

Page 1 has scale drawings before the reopening

page 12 has detailed drawings of the signal box

Page 13 has a great set of drawings for anybody modelling a modern IE footbridge

http://gccapps.galwaycoco.ie/viewexternaldocuments/ViewPDF?ref=1387517

http://www.eplanning.ie/GalwayCC/AppFileRefDetails/08443/0

Galway Co Co Planning reference 08443

There is more information in the other planning applications but the one linked seems to be the best

The O'Dea Collection has one picture from 1969 http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000307634

And I came across this one on flickr but the entire album is worth looking at 

Thank you very much for posting that @snapper. It is invaluable and your links have already solved a number of queries I had. Really appreciated. Noel

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I've managed to compress the size a little more after looking at the drawings posted by snapper.

gort01_diagram_rev30a.jpg

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Version 5 below fits on two 4' x 18" boards. Further compression and adjustments were made last night and a little poetic license with the length of the south end of west platform.  Need to be able to get two coaches and a loco alongside without compromising the goods yard shunting, as this station was predominantly used for freight.

gort05_diagram_rev050a.jpg

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Great looking idea and with prototype being straight as a die then  an easy track lay drawing looks like set track would do well   but is to be 21mm gauge  if a micro - a thought I was having having got a set of C&L 18.83 gauges and experimenting with micrometer and washers. ..

Robert 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, snapper said:

Out of interest, what planning software are you using?

RailModeller Pro on a mac

gort07_diagram_rev070a.png

Version 6 of Gort track plan as it continues to evolve through iterative process. 

Edited by Noel
fixed image
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Posted (edited)

The idea of a Gort station layout has been inspired by the iconic photos of Gort in Jonathan Beaumont and Barry Carse's wonderful book 'Rails Through The West'.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rails-Through-West-Limerick-Illustrated/dp/1780730063/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1538517346&sr=8-1&keywords=rails+through+the+west

Planning for Gort layout has been proceeding with many iterations of the track layout tried and measured for rolling stock fit and shunting operations possible.  Era will be 1960 to 1974 which covers Black'n'Tan era but the odd bit of early flying snail green sneaking in.  The layout initially will be a shunting layout, with the option of adding 'roundie' loop and 3 lane fiddle yard at the back in the future in case I ever exhibit. With that in mind I have made one small change to the 1960s track plan and that is to place a point and short head shunt at the Athenry end of the station in place of the catch point that was on the original.  This would facilitate independent shunting operations from 'roundie' running on the main line by another operator. For now this will be it on two boards, the main station 5ft x 18in and 4ft x 18in (right of red line below)

Version 9 of track plan.

Gort_Track_9a.jpg

Photos below reproduced here with permission

Gort early 1970s with pick up goods traffic. A hint of the beginning of containerisation is evidenced by the 20ft Bell container mixed in with the 2 axle wagons just south of the water tower.

Gort_RTTW_P29.jpg

A supertrain livery Sulzer 101 class waits with empty beet train heading back towards Athenry while B130 arrives from Athenry with goods train.

Gort_RTTW_P28.jpg

Gort

Gort_RTTW_P30.jpg

This is a beginning . . . Easter is supposed to be the end? :) 

Edited by Noel
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11 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

Best of luck with it, Noel - it will be a masterpiece!

Thanks JB. 😄 Oh no pressure then. Hopefully it will be an enjoyable learning experience using new materials and techniques acquired along the journey. 

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When I visited Gort first (on a service train) about 1975/6, it still had the old enamel GSR station sign on one platform.

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First Gort baseboard was constructed yesterday while on a visit to WMRC club house.

IMG_8255.jpg

Glass cloth used to strengthen the plywood joints.

IMG_8257.jpg

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More modular baseboards under construction. Under license from WMRC :) 

IMG_8308.jpg

Cabinet maker dowels added. Now ready for glass tape to reinforce the joints.

IMG_8310.jpg 

Its a very long time since I made baseboards.  This alternate method is interesting yet very fast due to hot glue gun.  In the past I used to screw and glue ply baseboard surfaces to wooden framing.  I would have preferred 4x2ft boards for portability in any vehicle, but these 5x2ft will still fit in the back of many cars with the back seat folded down and despite being 5ft long they are light for carrying.

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Some progress this evening 'testing' the viability of the track diagram. Roughly laid out old bits of track and tri-ang toy structures to get an idea if the track lengths would fit as intended and if the loops and sidings would accommodate the amount of goods wagons that I would need for shunting operations. Checked points did not straddle baseboard joins and cross members would not interfere with location of point motors underneath. 

IMG_8318.jpg

Spend a few hours adjusting rough track positioning and lengths to see what goods wagons would fit and how shunting might operate.

IMG_8323.jpg

As a shunting layout it fits on two 5ft x 2ft boards. Approx track positions marked and point motor holes to see if they were clear of the baseboard cross members and braces. Gort Station was primarily for goods traffic with limited passenger traffic.

IMG_8317.jpg

Next up seal baseboards with paint, drill wiring holes, apply cork surface, seal cork with paint, and then dry assemble code 75 track to double check all fits.

Edited by Noel
Lexdysia again
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That's looking REALLY nice!

One thing though - it's seems common to see these tapered end platforms on many layouts. I know they're standard Hornby stuff, but tapered platform ends were almost unknown not only in Ireland but anywhere else, with the sole exception of where travels were converging either side.

The only example I can think of in Ireland is the south end of the Loop Junction Platform (still extant, of course) at Downpatrick.

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5 minutes ago, jhb171achill said:

That's looking REALLY nice!

One thing though - it's seems common to see these tapered end platforms on many layouts. I know they're standard Hornby stuff, but tapered platform ends were almost unknown not only in Ireland but anywhere else, with the sole exception of where travels were converging either side.

The only example I can think of in Ireland is the south end of the Loop Junction Platform (still extant, of course) at Downpatrick.

Hi JB, Thanks, yes I knew that, I just chucked bits to approximate where the real ramps will go for sizing.  The ramps will be as per the track diagram and not tapered. :) 

PS: And there will be no Hornby toy bits allowed on Gort! :) 

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2 minutes ago, Noel said:

............And there will be no Hornby toy bits allowed on Gort! :) 

Excellent!!!!

So no class 08 shunters, James the engine of colour, or Flying Scotsmen either!

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8 minutes ago, jhb171achill said:

Excellent!!!!

So no class 08 shunters, James the engine of colour, or Flying Scotsmen either!

No indeed. Most of the structures will have to be scatch built or kit-bashed.  Platforms will be scratch built. B&T B141s will be the order of the day.

PS: But I might run a Black'n'Tan livery GM 201 class through it just for fun. :) 

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Shabby grey J15s (and a few Midland gems from Mayner) and BnT 141s will also be the order of the day at Dugort Harbour, which takes shape as we speak in the workshop of Baseboard Dave. I have one black "C", though I'm on the lookout for a decent green one too.

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I  always had a soft spot for Gort, most of the yard was retained and used for storing redundant wagons after the end of wagon load traffic. A lot of cement and possibly fertiliser traffic in later years appears to have been in connection with the merchants yard which was at a lower level than the railway, I remember watching a forklift off loading bagged cement off a train parked on the main line and delivering the pallets direct to the merchants yard.

Adding a head shunt improves the operationally flexibility of the station as a train from the Athenry direction can now enter the Ardrahan-Gort section while a train is shunting the yard. I would be inclined to reverse the crossover from the main line to the yard to allow a train from Limerick to run directly into the headshunt/layby and shunt clear of the main line. A further crossover controlled by a ground frame could be added further out to allow North bound goods trains to depart without setting back into the station. There was a similar arrangement for south bound cattle specials from the Up yard in Tuam

Gort.jpg.8dfdaa9033cfc69f55729a2020afbaf4.jpg

This allows two trains to cross at the station while a goods is recessed in the layby or shunting the yard, a common arrangement on the Galway Line and Mayo Road. Goods yard head shunts were fairly uncommon on the Limerick-Sligo line, Ennis & Tuam being the main exceptions, I guess traffic traffic levels never justified the investment.

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8 hours ago, Mayner said:

I  always had a soft spot for Gort, most of the yard was retained and used for storing redundant wagons after the end of wagon load traffic. A lot of cement and possibly fertiliser traffic in later years appears to have been in connection with the merchants yard which was at a lower level than the railway, I remember watching a forklift off loading bagged cement off a train parked on the main line and delivering the pallets direct to the merchants yard.

Adding a head shunt improves the operationally flexibility of the station as a train from the Athenry direction can now enter the Ardrahan-Gort section while a train is shunting the yard. I would be inclined to reverse the crossover from the main line to the yard to allow a train from Limerick to run directly into the headshunt/layby and shunt clear of the main line. A further crossover controlled by a ground frame could be added further out to allow North bound goods trains to depart without setting back into the station. There was a similar arrangement for south bound cattle specials from the Up yard in Tuam

Gort.jpg.8dfdaa9033cfc69f55729a2020afbaf4.jpg

This allows two trains to cross at the station while a goods is recessed in the layby or shunting the yard, a common arrangement on the Galway Line and Mayo Road. Goods yard head shunts were fairly uncommon on the Limerick-Sligo line, Ennis & Tuam being the main exceptions, I guess traffic traffic levels never justified the investment.

Hi John. Thanks for the suggestion and it makes a lot of sense. I am already considering not proceeding with the head shunt I added to the plan and instead revert to my original track plan with just the authentic catch point. Gort had unusual shunting arrangements on the main line with traffic coming from the Athenry direction, hence the unusual goods loop which allowed a loco  coming from Athenry to drop off a few leading wagons in front of goods shed and run around back to the main line, coupling up to the train and then proceeding on to Ennis and Limerick. Traffic coming from Limerick/Ennis direction used the main loop to uncouple from train allowing loco to simply shunt a few leading wagons by reversing them into the goods yard from the main line. I presume the driver would have needed the staff to do this movement unless there was another outer home signal a few hundred meters NE towards Athenry, but I can’t find any evidence of that. Reciprocal movements when picking up wagons. 

Edited by Noel

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Verified and adjusted track positioning was marked on the ply baseboards, then transposed onto grease proof paper roll in advance of the baseboards being sealed with grey primer.

IMG_8332.jpg

Edited by Noel
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