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What's This - Irish Trains in Movies or TV

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Guest hidden-agenda
That's brilliant! They made the stock for it?!

 

If i remember correctly cie used some chassis from 4w stock and the film company paid to have the bodies built , also the dummy side frames used for the loco 184 lay in Mullingar shed for a lot of years and may still be there yet.

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The carriages in ‘Educating Rita’ were definitely CIÉ ones, temporarily painted in BR colours for the film. While I can’t remember which type of vehicles they were (possibly 1339-1355 type side corridors as these were bein withdrawn for conversion to GSVs at the time), I do remember that the film company used water soluble paint, to aid removal after filming. Of course it rained before filming was completed and some of the painting had to be redone! The scene of them exiting the station was taken on the old carriage ramp at Pearse station. This descended from platform level to a gate on Westland Row, immediately beside the junction with Pearse St. The whole area has been obliterated by the Trinity College accommodation block.

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There is another one I spotted in a book where name boards on the carraige roof read French names, either one of the Pink Panthers or French Connection. Will have a look.

 

one of the pink panther films from the originals ones made was filmed here on a train with a dark blue light filter on the camera lens to make it look as if it was night time

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The carriages in ‘Educating Rita’ were definitely CIÉ ones, temporarily painted in BR colours for the film. While I can’t remember which type of vehicles they were (possibly 1339-1355 type side corridors as these were bein withdrawn for conversion to GSVs at the time), I do remember that the film company used water soluble paint, to aid removal after filming. Of course it rained before filming was completed and some of the painting had to be redone! The scene of them exiting the station was taken on the old carriage ramp at Pearse station. This descended from platform level to a gate on Westland Row, immediately beside the junction with Pearse St. The whole area has been obliterated by the Trinity College accommodation block.

 

the carriages were painted on one side the side that faced out on to Trinities grounds

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The wagons referred to first were made from old long-wheelbase CIE flats. Only one of the carriages had an interior; the bodies were of little more than plywood but really looked the part. They were loosely modelled on what would have been running on railways out of London in the 1850s - the time and place the film was set.

 

The BR-liveried carriages pictured in scenes of "Educating Rita" were done in Pearse (Westland Row) and are CIE "laminate" type carriages of the day. As mentioned above, they were painted on one side in water-soluble (and washable) paint; very convincingly too.

 

The scenes in the "Quiet Man" are true gems, showing a GSWR "60 class" in steam, and showing carriages of varying GSW and MGW origin. The station paintwork, footbridge detail and painted stones round flower beds, as well as the grey paintwork on the loco and 1945-55 period darker CIE green livery are very accurately shown. This should all be of great interest to modellers. The only thing non-authentic is the "Castletown" station nameboard. As most here will know, the scenes were filmed at Ballyglunin, between Athenry and Tuam.

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As most here will know, the scenes were filmed at Ballyglunin, between Athenry and Tuam.

 

Now that is interesting, I thought it had a more GSWR look about it! [Nerd alert] Am I right in thinking that the canopy overhead is a hollywood job, since the detail is pure pants?

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Black/tan A Class loco A60r and a couple laminates and cravens make appearance in the 1971 film Flight of the Doves, shot either at Carlisle Pier (or old Rosslare Harbour?).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NQWTnjAXOs&t=5m7s

The Pink Panther Strikes Again film was shot on the Navan branch in June 1976 using a mock SNCF train!!

 

And as mentioned, Islandbridge in Into the West (1992).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esXKsUku4xM&t=6m8s

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esXKsUku4xM&t=11m44s

Edited by Eiretrains
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Now that is interesting, I thought it had a more GSWR look about it! [Nerd alert] Am I right in thinking that the canopy overhead is a hollywood job, since the detail is pure pants?

 

Tuam was a GSWR outpost full of GSWR locos in the middle of Midland territory

 

The canopy is the original and at the time No 59 the pride of Tuam Shed seems to have been the regular engines for the Tuam Galway passenger trains.

 

There is a lot of interesting stuff on train working over this line in back issues of the RPSI Journl and "A Decade of Steam" pubished by the RPSI in the 70s.

 

In steam days Tuam was similar to a Division Point in American terms, with its own allocation of locos for working freight trains to Limerick and North to Sligo.

 

John

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Some more cinema / tv films featuring Irish trains include:

 

'Darling Lili', filmed in 1968, had A16 disguised as a luggage van pushing the non-steaming 184 ahead of it. Apparently the locomotive worked regular links while carrying the disguise, including the 5.07 pm Dublin to Bray suburban train on one occasion!

 

Scenes for the film ‘The Pink Panther Strikes Again’ were filmed on the Drogheda-Navan line in June 1976. The six-coach train was hauled by 001-class locomotive 048. The loco and stock were given an approximation of the SNCF livery with water paints. The coaches had stickers to represent ‘Paris, Limoges & Toulouse’ destination boards. The October 1976 Journal of the IRRS (V12 No. 71, pp 269/70) has full details.

 

'Michael Collins’ (1995) featured RPSI No. 461 and some of the Society’s carriages in Pearse station.

 

In October 1997 the Irish Traction Group’s preserved 001-Class locomotive A39 (039) in silver livery was used with three green RPSI coaches in scenes for the television mini-series ‘Amongst Women’. The filming work took place in Castlerea.

 

The carriages for the ‘First Great Train Robbery’ were constructed on underframes from redundant four-wheel vans. No one was allowed travel in the majority of the stock as the glazing consisted of ordinary household glass, rather than safety glass.

 

The scenes from ‘Flight of the Doves’ were filmed on the Carlisle Pier in Dún Laoghaire.

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yeah....i remember that episode. one second they were jumping around the 'miranda guinness', the next clip they were stuck at a level crossing, in a morris minor, and a steam train trundles past...then they ran into a heard of sheep! it was enough to make you weep...in fact:(( :((:((

Edited by heirflick
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The wind that shakes the Barley was another one.

 

I got that in a charity shop the other day, must make the effort to watch it.

 

Six Shooter, with Brendan Gleeson, has Cravens and beet wagons, as I recall, but the whole thing's gone off YouTube now, just a small sample left..

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THere's a litle known Irish Film called "The Rising of the Moon" released in 1957 and directed by John Ford. Tyrone Power introduces three short films. The middle one of theses called 'A Minute's Wait' is filmed on the 3' gauge West Clare Railway. Acted by players from the Abbey Theatre in Dublin it was also known as 'The Three Leaves of a Shamrock'.

Cheers,

FrankS

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yeah....i remember that episode. one second they were jumping around the 'miranda guinness', the next clip they were stuck at a level crossing, in a morris minor, and a steam train trundles past...then they ran into a heard of sheep! it was enough to make you weep...in fact:(( :((:((

 

That mid '80's episode got right on my tits. Here we were, one of the first countries to convert totally to diesel (and american ones at that), and they deliberately go out of their way to make it look like a 1940's timewarp. At least the Quiet Man had the good grace to be set in the 1920's.

 

And of course we won't talk about the episode of Mission Impossible set in Ireland, softcaps, grandfather shirts and a green white and gold stripe down the middle of the bar floor to seperate the "tribes".

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Don't forget the odd ball ones like "The Most Fertile Man in Ireland" filmed around the oll Sherriff St Flats and North Wall Midland when it was a freight yard, lots of shunting and reach stackers lumbering around with containers.

 

Classic Hammer Horror with Christopher Lee as Fu Manchu filmed around Dublin in the 1950s with a car chase along John's Road complete with Guiness Broad gauge Tramway.

 

John

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Does anybody remember a film (not sure if it was a cinema or tv film) dating from the 1960s or early 70s about a boy who had been in an industrial school in the west and which opened with him travelling back to Dublin by train after his release? There were some scenes of CIÉ trains in the Black & Tan livery, including a nice shot from the top of Liberty Hall of a train headed by a B121 on the Loop Line heading for Pearse station. Of course, in typical film fashion, the type of train he was travelling in kept changing. I think the name of the film was also the name of the main character, but fot the life of me I can't remember what it was!

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yeah....i remember that episode. one second they were jumping around the 'miranda guinness', the next clip they were stuck at a level crossing, in a morris minor, and a steam train trundles past...then they ran into a heard of sheep! it was enough to make you weep...in fact:(( :((:((

 

It was a bit of a corker I think it was filmed at Blakestown crossing on the Midland 184 trundles along with an RPSI set and magically transformed itself into the tail end of the Asahi Liner.

 

Does anyone remember the cigarette add from the 1960s that featured an O Gauge model railway with a B141 hauled freight train?

 

John

 

John

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