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Drogheda Viaduct

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Barl
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That's what I thought too, junctionmad. But I checked with someone in IE.

 

I thought the track arrangement was simplified a few years back, no? Single track with a a 'Y' point at either end...

 

Edit: Photo taken last year shows it's single track with check rails - Boyne Bridge Refurbishment

Edited by Garfield
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I thought the track arrangement was simplified a few years back, no? Single track with a a 'Y' point at either end...

 

Edit: Photo taken last year shows it's single track with check rails - Boyne Bridge Refurbishment

 

I think you are correct on that one. The interlaced track was removed, apparently over a decade ago.

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Having viewed this video repeatedly, I am of the opinion:-

 

1) The innermost two rails have no sheen on them.

2) The two outermost rails have a sheen on them.

 

These two facts suggest the outermost rails are the running rails and the innermost two are check rails. There are no other rails to protect a train in case of a derailment whilst traversing this structure. This being the case, the innermost two sets of rails are therefore - check rails!

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News to me, if it is, and if so my source (within ironroad Éireann) isn't up to date either!

 

I'll make definitive enquiries.

 

The interlaced track across the Boyne Viaduct was taken out of use on the night of the 2nd/3rd March 1997, following the passing of the 20:15 Dublin-Belfast service.

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Nice shot, Richie!! It looks like this has an interlaced up and down line with check rails on the inside also.

 

What would the advantage of an interlaced track (versus merging into a single road) have been? Absence of a facing point at the exit to the bridge in each direction?

 

Yes that's exactly the advantage

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I got out my private helicopter (kindly supplied by Google Maps) and took a flight over Drogheda just now. There are points either end of the viaduct, so it's ordinary single track. I don't know the technical term for the safety rails, they aren't check rails as such which are set just inside the back-to-back gauge. You see them on a lot of bridges though.

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I got out my private helicopter (kindly supplied by Google Maps) and took a flight over Drogheda just now. There are points either end of the viaduct, so it's ordinary single track. I don't know the technical term for the safety rails, they aren't check rails as such which are set just inside the back-to-back gauge. You see them on a lot of bridges though.

 

Guide Rails are the technical term

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Yes that's exactly the advantage

 

:tumbsup:

 

So I wonder why they needed interlaced track then but in this age of health and safety and high viz vests and ….

Well, why go with to a facing "Y" point now?

Are modern points more reliable with regard to absence of potential derailing, someone decided it had been unnecessary in the first place on safety grounds, or what?

The bridge is no lower now and I presume if the bridge itself was not going to 'hold' a derailing loco then it would not do any better job now. We did have a discussion about facing points and modern stiffer track on another thread here in the last year or so but I'm not sure if any of that factors into this?

 

Was the interlaced track controlled by a token/key as there were separate up down lines but these would normally overlap/interlace as here?

 

Were the tracks interlaced because bridge was too narrow or could not support the weight of two trains on the bridge simultaneously?

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:tumbsup:

 

So I wonder why they needed interlaced track then but in this age of health and safety and high viz vests and ….

Well, why go with to a facing "Y" point now?

Are modern points more reliable with regard to absence of potential derailing, someone decided it had been unnecessary in the first place on safety grounds, or what?

The bridge is no lower now and I presume if the bridge itself was not going to 'hold' a derailing loco then it would not do any better job now. We did have a discussion about facing points and modern stiffer track on another thread here in the last year or so but I'm not sure if any of that factors into this?

 

Was the interlaced track controlled by a token/key as there were separate up down lines but these would normally overlap/interlace as here?

 

Were the tracks interlaced because bridge was too narrow or could not support the weight of two trains on the bridge simultaneously?

 

Complex track work is an anathema to modern rail companies and especially IE. Modern tamping machines. Etc also dictate the use of simple track work and modern turnouts are pre fabricated virtually like hornby set track.

 

The bridge was singled in the 1920s when the centre arch was replaced.

 

I presume that the signalling merely treated guantletted track as n a similar way to the current arrangement, with a one train in section approach

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Were the tracks interlaced because bridge was too narrow or could not support the weight of two trains on the bridge simultaneously?

 

The original bridge had had double track, but was worked as a single line to avoid having two trains on the bridge at the same time.

 

When the bridge was replaced in the early 1930s, the line was temporarily singled for the duration of the work, and the new bridge was built inside the old one. This then meant that the new bridge was too narrow for double track, but since there had a restriction on having two trains on the bridge at the same time for many years, the provision of gauntleted double track was not a problem. On completion of the new bridge, the old bridge was then dismantled.

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  • 1 year later...

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