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GNR and GSR goods vans in 1970s CIE use.

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jhb171achill
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These were indiscriminately mixed with CIE "H" vans in traffic. Vans of this type had "N" after the number, both stencilled on the side AND on the CIE cast chassis plate, e.g. 111N which is one of these.

 

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These vans dated from 1954, among the last built by the GNR(B) and just a few years older than the "H" vans. Also to be seen among them well into the seventies were the last few of the distinctive GSR inside framed goods vans, designed by jhb171senior's senior.

 

image.jpg

 

....and for comparison, a standard "H".

 

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Vans of this type had "N" after the number, both stencilled on the side AND on the CIE cast chassis plate, e.g. 111N which is one of these.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23062[/ATTACH]

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23063[/ATTACH]

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23064[/ATTACH]

Is there a good reference book for these older stock? Pender & Richards (1967) refer succinctly to 138 16T covered wagons on steel under frames built between 1954-1956 by GNR(I) for cement traffic. Are these the wagons being referred to?

 

The H van series were CIE Covered Wagons numbered 18862-19753, 19269 in JB's photo. 892 were built between 1958-1962! Amazing that such a prolific wagon has not been produced as an rtr!

 

As an aside, someone posted a late 1970s? 266XX? TANK wagon for MOLASSES in the last week, and I have been going crazy trying to locate it. If anybody remembers what I'm talking about would you please PM me so I can delete this request. Thank you!

Edited by DiveController
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Kevin

 

I'm not quite sure what you mean by a reference book, but no-one has published a book on Irish wagons.

 

I did three runs of the 16 ton van - which are very close to the Dapol Banana van - so there are about 500 of these vans on various layouts. I was thinking of doing another run, maybe in the 1970s CIE guise?

 

Anyway, I have the full number list of such wagons, in my copy of the GNR Wagon Book.

 

I'm afraid that wagon info is dotted all over the place. I know that the IRRS Archive has a copy of the GNR Wagon Book, but as for CIE, or GSR, I'll have to investigate.

 

Leslie

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Just a question to manufacturers: since model wagons, of all types, seem to come from makers with default black chassis (almost never appropriate for Ireland), do the models made specially for here? In other words, do they come with the plastic of the chassis the same colour as the body, or is it up to the buyer to paint it to match?

 

I'm thinking maybe the manufacturers have no choice but to buy chassis elsewhere all in black?

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On cheap models, the chassis is a plastic colour and the various codes (brake test etc.) and running numbers are tampo printed on. It's no longer recommended to do it this way as the printing will come off over time. The right way (the way IRM are doing it) is to paint the body and chassis, and then print the decals, even if the paint is the same colour as the plastic, seal it, then assemble.

 

You could see how the cost would climb to make each part, paint it, let it dry, and only then assemble the separately painted body and chassis. It triples the workload involved, and the resulting price. It's just down to cost.

 

R.

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The GN wagon seems to have lost its CIE "N" suffix. Any ideas what 181AX means. The X may be for scrapping. "A" would have been of GSWR origin which it's not, correct:confused:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23063[/ATTACH]

 

 

I was also wondering about the "C" on this van

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23064[/ATTACH]

 

 

And the significance of 248X on the GSR van

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23065[/ATTACH]
Edited by DiveController
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All three of those designations "X" = scrap and "C" = condemned, were added after (recent) withdraw and have no relevance to the running numbers or company origin. They are something like lot numbers for scrapping.

 

I remember seeing vans still in service in Tralee with the C painted on, rather like the B on opens for beet service.

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  • 3 months later...

It's probably been asked before but did the GNRI vans have RCH or Morton brakes? The difference between the two is subtle but it's important to put the right underframe under the Dapol banana van in order to produce the GNRI van.

Many thanks.

 

Stephen

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It's probably been asked before but did the GNRI vans have RCH or Morton brakes? The difference between the two is subtle but it's important to put the right underframe under the Dapol banana van in order to produce the GNRI van.

Many thanks.

 

Stephen

 

The GNR (I) 16T cement wagons, CIE Pallet Vans had RCH brake gear. Non-Ventilated Van

 

I am not sure if anyone does a rtr 10' wb chassis with this form of brake gear.

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